HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The terrorist's son by Zak Ebrahim
Loading...

The terrorist's son

by Zak Ebrahim

Series: TED Books

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1087158,042 (3.93)11

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 11 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
I just finished this book.

I'm bouncing between a 4 and 5 star rating on this one. I think I'm going to let it settle in for a few days and see how I feel.

It is a short and easy read. It's emotional, heartbreaking, inspirational. There are lines that just sit with you and for a moment. Everything is real, pretty well written, characters are told well.

The narration brings you in. This is something that other books of this type have neglected to do for me (A Child Called It). I do wish it was longer. I think that is my only complaint. ( )
  Katrinia17 | Dec 30, 2017 |
2015 alex award
  jothebookgirl | Jan 3, 2017 |
The author is the son of the man who assassinated Rabbi Meir Kahane and helped plan the first bombing of the World Trade Center. His story shows the effect a terrorist's act can have on his/her family, especially when they don't sympathize with it. I found the depiction of his spirituality of his mother, who converted from Catholicism to Islam, even more interesting and strange. ( )
  baobab | Apr 24, 2015 |
This was a very short but very intense book by the son of the man convicted of the World Trade Center bombing. It was a tale of how it is possible to be raised in an environment of hatred and violence but come out loving and peaceful.

Zak Ebrahim's father was from Egypt and married an American woman who had embraced the Islam religion. They had three sons and seemed to be a perfect family until things started to go wrong. His father lost his job and had to take ones with less money and less prestige than his engineering background should have provided. The worse things got the more he turned to his mosque and the Quran. He shot and killed a rabbi and was sent to prison for related charges. While he was in prison he organized the bombing of the WTC. After that he was sentenced to life without parole.

Growing up in the middle of all this turmoil, Zak was bullied and brutally abused by his stepfather but made his own mind up to reject the violence and hate. ( )
  mamzel | Feb 18, 2015 |
This was a fascinating story about the son of a terrorist. It is a very fast read and gives insight into a world very few are allowed to see. In some ways I wish the book had included more. For example, the family who grew up in the US, moves to Egypt and very little is told of their move or their adjustment to life in a foreign country. Also I feel like some emotions have been glossed over. It almost seems like an outsider is writing when he tells about the people who did him wrong. He describes the scenes well, but I never feel his anger, resentment or betrayal as I was reading the scene.

I would DEFINITELY recommend this book. ( )
  KamGeb | Feb 13, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
A man is but a product of his thoughts.  What he thinks, he becomes. -- Gandhi
Dedication
First words
My mothers shakes me awake in my bed: "There's been an accident," she says.
Quotations
Page 12:  There's a reason that murderous hatred has to be taught -- and not just taught, but forcibly implanted.  It's not a naturally occurring phenomenon.  It is a lie.  It is a lie told over and over again -- often to people who have no resources and who are denied alternative views of the world.  It's a lie my father believed, and one he hoped to pass on to me.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to "Remember El-Sayyid Nosair." In The Terrorist's Son, Ebrahim dispels the myth that terrorism is a foregone conclusion for people trained to hate. Based on his own journey, he shows that hate is always a choice and so is tolerance. Though Ebrahim was subjected to a violent, intolerant ideology throughout his childhood, he did not become radicalized. Terrorist groups tap into certain vulnerabilities that are usually circumstantial poverty, oppression, disenfranchisement, lack of resources and options. Ebrahim shows how those same vulnerabilities can create great strengths, leading people to form great reserves of empathy and tolerance. He believes that, because we all have a deep capacity for empathy, humans have the choice-and can find the will-to reject negative ideology.

Contents:

November 5, 1990 : Cliffside Park, New Jersey -- Present day -- 1981 : Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania -- 1986 : Jersey City, New Jersey -- January 1991 : Rikers Island Correctional Facility, New York -- December 21, 1991 : New York Supreme Court, Manhattan -- February 26, 1993 : Jersey City, New Jersey -- April 1996 : Memphis, Tennessee -- December 1998 : Alexandria, Egypt -- July 1999 : Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Zak Ebrahim's 9-minute TED talk,  now available at go.ted.com/ebrahim.

"A portion of the earnings the author received to write this book have been donated to Tuesday's Children, a nonprofit organization helping communities affected by terrorism around the world.

Learn more about Tuesday's Children: www.tuesdayschildren.org."
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayed Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to "Remember El-Sayed Nosair." In The Terrorist's Son, Ebrahim dispels the myth that terrorism is a foregone conclusion for people trained to hate. Based on his own remarkable journey, he shows that hate is always a choice and so is tolerance. Though Ebrahim was subjected to a violent, intolerant ideology throughout his childhood, he did not become radicalized. Terrorist groups tap into certain vulnerabilities that are usually circumstantial poverty, oppression, disenfranchisement, lack of resources and options. Ebrahim shows how those same vulnerabilities can create great strengths, leading people to form great reserves of empathy and tolerance. He believes that, because we all have a deep capacity for empathy, humans have the choice-and can find the will-to reject negative ideology."--Provided by publisher.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 4
4 6
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,060,875 books! | Top bar: Always visible