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The Girl Who Came Back to Life: A Fairytale…
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The Girl Who Came Back to Life: A Fairytale (edition 2014)

by Craig Staufenberg

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213495,208 (3.75)None
Member:Tea58
Title:The Girl Who Came Back to Life: A Fairytale
Authors:Craig Staufenberg
Info:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (2014), Paperback, 180 pages
Collections:Untitled collection
Rating:****
Tags:death, travel, pilgrimage, grandparents, preadolescent girl, gambling, small amt of violence, child labor, bakeries

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The Girl Who Came Back to Life: A Fairytale by Craig Staufenberg

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The Girl Who Came Back to Life was a very interesting and strange story. It follows a young girl who has just lost her parents and must travel North to see them off into the afterlife - but decides instead that she wants to bring them back to life.

The book jumps right in from their death and Sophie's attempts to make money and then the travels North; and it because it jumps right in there is not much time to learn about the character or even learn to feel for her as a reader. Give it a chance though. Once you get to about the halfway point you feel her mission take hold of you and want her to achieve and it is a wonderful story. The grandmother is horrible most of the time and that is saddening, but the people Sophie encounters along her journey are amazing and full of light in this almost depressing tale.

Sophie is strong, stubborn, and determined to reach her parents. Dealing with emotions that she has always suppressed Sophie learns a lot about herself on her journey North. Although as a reader we only see this through the transformations in Sophie as she travels - the tale is actually told as if by a narrator looking into her tale. It is a beautiful story.

The format itself is very easy to read; the chapters are short and there were a good amount of break-pages in between the chapters so its length is very short overall. I was surprised by this - the story if so deep yet the chapters leave a lot to the imagination. It was a very interesting read and I enjoyed it. ( )
  sszkutak | Sep 28, 2016 |
Sophie's parents have died, leaving her an orphan. Even more importantly, leaving her the only one who can release their spirit from the City of the Dead. When a person dies, their loved one must send them on to the next world by making a gruesome and dangerous journey north and up a mountain to the City of the Dead in order to say 'Goodbye' and release their spirit. Sophie has every intention of going to the City, but not saying goodbye, she wants to tell her parents to come right back where they came from. When her parents die, Sophie is taken in by her distant and seemingly harsh grandmother, who is not going to make it easy on Sophie to get what she wants.

From the introduction, I felt intrigued by the City of the Dead. Then when we meet Sophie, I was even more interested. Sophie is smart, daring and willing to learn. Without the blurb I couldn't quite place Sophie's age, at times she seemed much younger than her 12 years and at times older. However, this is a journey where Sophie grows up and learns valuable life lessons about grief, friendship, and saying goodbye. This short story is told in a fairytale style with third-person narration that let me be able to imagine the trials and tribulations of Sophie's journey that included a train, bus, boat, vans and mountains as well as the mysterious City of the Dead. I was glad that unlike many traditional fairytales, Sophie is the hero of her own story.

This book was received for free in return for an honest review. ( )
  Mishker | Oct 4, 2014 |
Sophie, the twelve year old, in The Girl Who Came Back To Life by Craig Staufenberg has come to know the reality of life because both of her parents have died. When death happens in Sophie's word, the dead are sent far to the cold, cold North. There they wait for their families to come and release them to go to the other side where there is a kind of peace for them. Most families go far North to say goodbye and release their loved ones. It's Sophie's intentions to bring her parents back home with her.As for her Grandmother, who knows her intentions? She is still deeply mourning Sophie's Grandfather.With her she always carries a love letter from her husband. It is hoped she will be able to release him when it's time.

Along the way of this pilgrimage, Sophie meets many dangers. She meets dangerous truckers. Sees a man shot in the chest, and she gambles to make the money needed for her to go North.

The whole story is wonderfully told like any fairytale. Like most fairytales there are subtle lessons along the way. Those lessons are about how people react to the death of those whom they love. Is it possible to let go immediately? Is there a process or time period for becoming able to let go of those who have gone before us? Is there a need for closure like a strong, heartfelt, personal goodbye? Can we survive the loss of a loved one?

I thoroughly enjoyed the novella. The cover of the book gave me no idea what to expect. I disliked the cover immensely. To me, a cover can be just as important as what is written in a book. If I had to pick this book to read, I would not have picked it because the cover is bland and very hard to interpret.

Anyway, I loved this wonderful fairytale about a part of our life's journey which must take place one day. We come to live. We come to die. We come to let those whom we love go in death. I will look forward to the author's other books. I think this is his third one.virtualbooktourcafe.com/craig-staufenberg ( )
  Tea58 | Oct 4, 2014 |
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