HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet:…
Loading...

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet: Wayfarers 1 (original 2014; edition 2015)

by Becky Chambers (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7805811,816 (4.06)214
Member:paulmorriss
Title:The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet: Wayfarers 1
Authors:Becky Chambers (Author)
Info:Hodder & Stoughton (2015), Edition: First Edition, 416 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers (2014)

  1. 40
    Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both are optimistic space operas that focus on the characters and their relationships.
  2. 00
    Ascension by Jacqueline Koyanagi (rarm)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 214 mentions

English (56)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  All (58)
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
Whenever I find myself re-reading parts of a book, I know that I'm reading a favorite. The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet is delightful, both as space opera and as a character studies. Watching the shipmates on the Wayfarer work, bond, solve problems, and survive is intensely satisfying.

to my mind, one of the most impressive things about the book is the author's ability to create separate cultures and habits of mind. The crew of the Wayfarer has 6 species represented, including the Artificial Intelligence, and each has its moments and its distinctive thoughts.

All in all, a delight and probably worth re-reading. ( )
  barlow304 | Jul 12, 2017 |
This review and others posted over at my blog.

Rosemary has used up her savings to hide her past and leave her home planet of Mars. She joins the multi-species crew of a ship whose job it is to punch wormholes through space. Rosemary is finally free to explore the galaxy and finds unexpected friendships among the diverse crew. Among adventure and danger Rosemary learns that there’s more to family than blood.

I don’t know how to talk about this book, but it’s so, so, so good. One of those books where I knew from the first few pages that I was going to love it. So glad my friend Chels reccommended it.

Angry Planet is a fabulously character-driven sci-fi. The characters are everything and I love them. But! Don’t be alarmed! There’s still a plot (a good one, I think) and plenty of cool future-tech and science techno-babble. I really enjoyed the way Chambers handled the science aspects. I’m in no way classified to talk about the realism or potential of the future and technology she created, but I found it convincing. It wasn’t overbearing or confusing and blended into the story and the lives of her characters very well.

I, just, I don’t know. This book is a bit of a slow burn but before you know it you’re loving all the characters and their histories and their relationships and then things happen and you’re like, “ah!” and you have feelings and then you love this book!

This is by far the most diverse sci-fi (or…any genre probably) book I’ve ever read. I don’t consciously seek out diversity in my reads, but I love it. Angry Planet has a variety of religions/life outlooks, species, interspecies relationships, LGBT characters and even the (incredibly interesting) subject of AI sentience and their rights. I even encountered the term ‘xyr’ for the first time. Chambers has created a vast and varied universe that had me 100% invested and left me wanting more.

If you like character driven sci-fi, diversity, AI and books that are just plain good, definitely pick this up. I can’t wait to read the second book and Angry Planet might even been the best sci-fi I've read! ( )
  MillieHennessy | Jul 4, 2017 |
I wanted to love this book. A group of disparate people thrown together in a meandering spaceship journey? Basically my favorite genre! But the way Becky Chambers actually executed this premise left something to be desired. There was just too little conflict-- I'm not saying that everyone needed to be at each others' throats like an episode of The Expanse, but spending a year with your friends in the confines of a spaceship would bring up more interpersonal conflicts than these guys experienced, as anyone who's roomed with and/or worked alongside anyone would know. But the characters here either get along in a completely lovely fashion or are Total Jerks.

I also felt very uncomfortable with the way the majority of the crewmembers impose their moral views on one character and their way of life, in a book that was otherwise about celebrating the joys of multiculturalism and (what I guess you might call) multibiologism. I don't think the book sufficiently made the case that a particular character was being exploited to justify what was done to them against their will.

There's also not enough external conflict. I'm fine with there not being an overarching plot beyond the journey itself (I am, after all, a big fan of the Oz novels), but it felt like too often the Wayfarer arrived somewhere, talked to the people, and just moved on, without any kind of problem to overcome. Really there are only two segments of tension in the whole novel. And I guess this bothers me because it also prevents the characters from popping as much as they could; I want to see more of them struggling, to see what they're like. I did like the milieu and premise Chambers created (particularly her vision of future Human culture, the Exodans), but I'm unconvinced this is the best possible story that could have been told in it. I didn't hate the novel or anything, but I basically finished feeling it was okay, with occasional flashes of interest. I will read the next book because I "have to" for Hugos voting, but I'm not sure I would have bothered otherwise.
  Stevil2001 | Jun 30, 2017 |
This review and others posted over at my blog.

Rosemary has used up her savings to hide her past and leave her home planet of Mars. She joins the multi-species crew of a ship whose job it is to punch wormholes through space. Rosemary is finally free to explore the galaxy and finds unexpected friendships among the diverse crew. Among adventure and danger Rosemary learns that there’s more to family than blood.

I don’t know how to talk about this book, but it’s so, so, so good. One of those books where I knew from the first few pages that I was going to love it. So glad my friend Chels reccommended it.

Angry Planet is a fabulously character-driven sci-fi. The characters are everything and I love them. But! Don’t be alarmed! There’s still a plot (a good one, I think) and plenty of cool future-tech and science techno-babble. I really enjoyed the way Chambers handled the science aspects. I’m in no way classified to talk about the realism or potential of the future and technology she created, but I found it convincing. It wasn’t overbearing or confusing and blended into the story and the lives of her characters very well.

I, just, I don’t know. This book is a bit of a slow burn but before you know it you’re loving all the characters and their histories and their relationships and then things happen and you’re like, “ah!” and you have feelings and then you love this book!

This is by far the most diverse sci-fi (or…any genre probably) book I’ve ever read. I don’t consciously seek out diversity in my reads, but I love it. Angry Planet has a variety of religions/life outlooks, species, interspecies relationships, LGBT characters and even the (incredibly interesting) subject of AI sentience and their rights. I even encountered the term ‘xyr’ for the first time. Chambers has created a vast and varied universe that had me 100% invested and left me wanting more.

If you like character driven sci-fi, diversity, AI and books that are just plain good, definitely pick this up. I can’t wait to read the second book and Angry Planet might even been the best sci-fi I've read! ( )
  MillieHennessy | Jun 21, 2017 |
This is one of the best books I have ever read. It's a road movie in space which allows you to explore and understand each and every crew member of the Wayfarer. This book made me, a 39 year old man, cry on a packed train.

There isn't some galactic problem, some incredibly important mission that needs solving, or some undiscovered alien race threatening the existence of life. It's simply the story of a crew travelling to somewhere far away near a small, angry planet to do their job.

It's simply incredible. ( )
1 vote MikePearce | Jun 19, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Becky Chambersprimary authorall editionscalculated
Aquan, Richard L.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Doll, ChristopherCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Szafranski, Paula RussellDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
From the ground, we stand;
From our ships, we live;
By the stars, we hope.

- Exodan Proverb
Dedication
For my family, hatch and feather
First words
As she woke up in the pod, she remembered three things.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Somewhere within our
crowded sky, a crew of wormhole builders hops from planet to planet, on
their way to the job of a lifetime. To the galaxy at large, humanity is a
minor species, and one patched-up construction vessel is a mere speck
on the starchart. This is an everyday sort of ship, just trying to get
from here to there.

But all voyages leave their mark, and even
the most ordinary of people have stories worth telling. A young Martian
woman, hoping the vastness of space will put some distance between
herself and the life she‘s left behind. An alien pilot, navigating life
without her own kind. A pacifist captain, awaiting the return of a loved
one at war.

Set against a backdrop of curious cultures and
distant worlds, this episodic tale weaves together the adventures of
nine eclectic characters, each on a journey of their own.
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
84 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.06)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 10
2.5 7
3 20
3.5 26
4 94
4.5 33
5 66

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 116,187,273 books! | Top bar: Always visible