HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable…
Loading...

The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the… (edition 2015)

by Norman Doidge (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
382948,894 (4.04)3
" The New York Times bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness. In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience-what we call neuroplasticity. His revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us-light, sound, vibration, movement-which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brain's own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use. For centuries it was believed that the brain's complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain's Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing. As he did so lucidly in The Brain That Changes Itself, Doidge uses stories to present cutting-edge science with practical real-world applications, and principles that everyone can apply to improve their brain's performance and health"-- "Norman Doidge's revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us--light, sound, vibration, movement--which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brain's own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use. For centuries it was believed that the brain's complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain's Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing"--… (more)
Member:TerraLaurel
Title:The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity
Authors:Norman Doidge (Author)
Info:Viking (2015), Edition: 1st, 409 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity by Norman Doidge

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
In this book, Doidge describes using methods that help the brain to achieve homeostasis naturally, or through unusual means. For instance they may use low intensity lasers in some cases and neurofeedback in others. Meditation comes up often, as does mindfulness and other terms related to eastern meditative practices.

All in all the book is quite fascinating and inspiring. Truly a joy to read. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
THE most interesting I have ever read, bar none. This where medicine in going, but it seems like magic in these early days. ( )
  Eye_Gee | May 8, 2017 |
It's persuasive and relates powerful anecdotes about the life changing ways people have changed their brains. There are some amazing stories of individual experiences with various therapeutic approaches. While the stories are sometimes quite inspiring, I would have been more impressed with evidence from large scale studies rather than personal anecdotes or what seemed to be carefully selected small research studies. I think it's better to know if an amazing therapeutic discovery works for millions of people all over the world, rather than tens or hundreds. It's hard to tell from this book, and it reduced my appreciation of it significantly.
  Pencils | May 16, 2016 |
A while ago I read and reviewed this author´s first book “The brain that changes itself” and found it fascinating. I deem the present book to be even more so.

First we learn of the case of the psychiatrist/pain specialist Michael Moskowitz, who after a horrific accident, had chronic pain for 13 years, He got rid of the pain by visualizing that the areas of his brain producing it are shrinking, after discovering that two brain areas process both visual information and pain. The assumption is that these areas cannot process pain and visualize at the same time. He teaches his patients to use the same method to dissolve their chronic pain.

In fact, though, I do not see that these cases prove anything, since it is known that all visualization can work, even visualization that has nothing to do with pain. It would have been interesting if the author could also have explained to us how visualization in general works.

Other scientists have found that patients can “shrink” their body image to rewire their brains. When patients with chronic hand pain looked through binoculars at their hands and thus magnified them, pain was increased; when they looked through the wrong end of the binoculars so their hands looked smaller, pain decreased.

A Parkinson´s patient, John Pepper, learnt how to reverse his major symptoms and walk normally by a system he devised to exercise conscious control over his walking. He formed a Parkinson´s support group and taught hundreds of other such patients to drop their shuffling gait and move more freely and effectively. After mastering walking he began to take conscious control over his tremor.

A chapter on rewiring the brain with light tells us how sunlight heals babies with jaundice. Florence Nightingale exposed her patients to as much sun as possible and thereby ensured their healing,

Fred Kahn was healed of a rotator cuff injury by laser treatment (as I myself was), and began using low-intensity laser treatments to heal horrific wounds, diabetic ulcers, burns, psoriasis, black, gangrenous limbs, etc. etc. ; also rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, some psychiatric disorders, nerve injuries and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can be healed in this way.

We are told how LED lights, in the red and infrared range, which have laser-like properties, were used on eight areas of the head of a woman with disabling TBI symptoms. She couldn´t concentrate or sleep, became easily exhausted, couldn´t complete tasks and had lost her ability to speak two foreign languages. After her first treatment she slept 18 hours and began improving significantly.

A Boston group has found laser treatment helpful in TBI. “Laser acupuncture” was used by placing light on acupuncture points. Lasers harmlessly and painlessly pass light energy into meridians. In China lasers are used to treat paralysis in stroke patients, resulting in significant improvements.

The case of Gabrielle is described; following removal of a life-threatening brain tumour she had trouble swallowing and eating, was constantly nauseous, had balance problems and difficulty walking. People could hardly hear her speak; she used the wrong words, like “fork” instead of “knife”, and couldn´t multi-task; she had lost her short-term memory, couldn´t recognize objects and could see only what was directly in front of her; she was hypersensitive to all sounds, which seemed unbearably loud; she was chronically exhausted.

Fred Kahn rewired Gabrielle´s brain with light by means of his laser treatments, and she was healed.

Lasers were used successfully by Kahn and others to heal other brain problems, together with cardiovascular problems.

Light therapy is also being used to improve damaged connections between neurons in Alzheimer´s.

There is a great chapter on the work of Moshe Feldenkrais with healing serious brain problems through mental awareness of movement.

These various healers came to their discoveries through working on and mastering their own severe health problems.

A baby girl missing part of her brain, a third of her cerebellum, who could neither sit up nor crawl, and whose parents were told the best they could hope for was “profound retardation” was healed by Feldenkrais´s special techniques. He pronounced that the girl would dance at her wedding. She now has two graduate degrees from major universities, is a voracious reader, and did indeed dance at her wedding.

There´s a chapter entitled “A Blind Man Learns to See” about a man called Webber who lost his sight owing to uveitis, an autoimmune disease. He was healed by doing exercises recommended by Feldenkrais which were similar to four ancient Buddhist exercises and also to Bates´ techniques.

Webber needed help from Feldenkrais to be cured, but the four basic techniques which helped were as follows:

1) Meditate on the colour blue-black for a few hours a day.
2) Move the eyes up, down, left and right, and around in circles, as well as on diagonals.
3) Blink frequently.
4) Sun your eyes. Sit with eyes closed in the morning or late afternoon and let the warmth and light of the sun penetrate through the eye tissues ten to twenty minutes a day.

Deep relaxation of the eyes is essential.

We learn about an amazing device called the PoNS that healed a singer called Ron who could no longer sing because of MS, had trouble swallowing and suffered from unrelenting exhaustion. PoNS stands for Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator. You put the device in your mouth where it painlessly stimulates the tongue and its sensory receptors “with waves of gentle signals”. After thirty years of steadily worsening symptoms Ron´s improvement was rapid and vast. All his MS symptoms improved.

There are 48 different kinds of sensory receptors on the tongue and these receptors pass electrical signals to nerve fibres, then on to the brain.

The PoNS device sits on the front two-thirds of the tongue. After 400-600 milliseconds brain waves are stabilized and all parts of the brain start to react, firing together. The tongue stimulation activates the whole brain. While using the device the patient at the same time does an appropriate exercise. A person with difficulty walking should try to walk, then run, on a treadmill when using the PoNS. The device resets the brain.

We are provided with case histories of persons with both Parkinson´s and MS who were healed by the PoNS, together with persons severely brain injured in car accidents.

We hear about Tomatis´s Electronic Ear, which helped struggling singers who were not hearing high frequencies well. Once they could hear properly, they could sing properly. Tomatis trained the brain by stimulating the ear. We are given the case history of a boy born prematurely who had severe developmental problems and who was heled by using the Electronic Ear. This listening therapy is also effective against autism.

It is said that the core feature of autism is an inability “to empathize and apprehend the existence of other minds”. This is not true, however. A more precise explanation is as follows: “Battered by sound, these children remain in fight-or flight and cannot turn on the social engagement system”.

This is not only an amazing, enlightening book informing us of many not generally known ways of healing all sorts of severe brain problems, but the author writes in an engaging manner, including many personal details and descriptions of the various therapists and their healed clients, so we feel we know them personally.

Though this is obviously a scientific book comprising innumerable technical details, I found it to be easy to read. I would say that it is the most informative, useful and enlightening book I have read for at least a decade, and I have read many such books. I would wish that all those with brain injuries and problems could have access to one or more of the exciting treatments mentioned. ( )
1 vote IonaS | Apr 10, 2016 |
This was a fascinating series of essays about the neuroplasticity of the brain and the way some remarkable individuals have used that quality to effect amazing changes in physical conditions that are usually deemed too hard to deal with.
Highly recommended. ( )
  quiBee | Jan 21, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

" The New York Times bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness. In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience-what we call neuroplasticity. His revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us-light, sound, vibration, movement-which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brain's own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use. For centuries it was believed that the brain's complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain's Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing. As he did so lucidly in The Brain That Changes Itself, Doidge uses stories to present cutting-edge science with practical real-world applications, and principles that everyone can apply to improve their brain's performance and health"-- "Norman Doidge's revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us--light, sound, vibration, movement--which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brain's own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use. For centuries it was believed that the brain's complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain's Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing"--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.04)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 5
3.5 2
4 11
4.5 1
5 14

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 152,610,946 books! | Top bar: Always visible