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Aesop's Fables [selected and adapted by Jack…
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Aesop's Fables [selected and adapted by Jack Zipes]

by Aesop

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I'd say that some of the bad press that foxes have suffered from over the years can be attributed to the Fables (as well as other early children's stories). And are donkeys so deserving of their lowly status?

Aesop's Fables have been with us for millenia, and they are still enjoyable today, full of wit and wisdom. ( )
  soylentgreen23 | Dec 1, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140621288, Paperback)

Sardonic, wry and wise, "Aesop's Fables" are some of the most enduring and well-loved literary creations in history. In a series of pithy, amusing vignettes, Aesop created a vivid cast of characters to demonstrate different aspects of human nature. Here we see a wily fox outwitted by a quick-thinking cicada, a tortoise triumphing over a self-confident hare and a fable-teller named Aesop silencing those who mock him. Each jewel-like fable provides a warning about the consequences of wrong-doing, as well as offering a glimpse into the everyday lives of Ancient Greeks.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:34 -0400)

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