HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Alexander to Actium: The Historical…
Loading...

Alexander to Actium: The Historical Evolution of the Hellenistic Age (1990)

by Peter Green

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
294558,063 (4.39)10
  1. 00
    The Hellenistic world by F. W. Walbank (timspalding)
    timspalding: These two books go together very well, with some overlap in content.
  2. 00
    Alexander of Macedon 356-323 B.C.: A Historical Biography by Peter Green (timspalding)
    timspalding: Green's history of Alexander has somewhat less scholarly apparatus, but a stronger narrative.
  3. 00
    Hellenistic culture: fusion and diffusion by Moses Hadas (timspalding)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 10 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
A massive tome and comprehensive examination of history, culture and philosophy during the Hellenistic era. Alexander was barely cold before his successors began the struggle over ruler ship of his empire. The Greek city-states had resurgent ambitions for independence, repeatedly thwarted. Eventually the civic character of the Greeks turned inward and men of ability concentrated on private riches rather than political ambition. In Egypt, the Ptolemies maintained a basically Greek ruler-ship with little contact with or appreciation of the Egyptian culture. Egypt was simply a rich place to rob. One does wonder about the private lives of some of the rulers--especially the women--married to an uncle as he seizes the throne, divorced and married to a brother who has overthrown the uncle, then remarried to the uncle when he manages a comeback. Whole new shades of meaning to "honey, I'm home." An interesting read and an impressive accomplishment. I would hate to be tested on it. So many rulers, so few names.
  ritaer | Sep 3, 2017 |
I had a wonderful time with this book! The Hellenistic period is often scanted, with authors jumping from the death of Alexander directly to the Rise of Rome. A lot went on in the Eastern Mediterranean and points east while the romans laboriously put their method and their state together. for the bulk of the middle Sea's population, the doings of the Ptolemies of Egypt was more important than the Punic Wars. I am glad that this book exists to educate the casual reader in the proportion with with the period should be seen. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Nov 21, 2013 |
This book presents a fantastically broad overview of the Hellenistic age, including political developments, social and economic history, science, philosophy, art etc. And it's very well written, too. Anyone interested in the Hellenistic age should start with this book.
  thcson | Aug 25, 2010 |
Sholarly, a little heavy but eminently readable. This covers the age of Hellenism from the Death of Alexander (323 BCE) to the battle of Actium which ended the Roman Republic in 31 BCE. 240 pages of notes and chronology, lots of B&W pictures. ( )
  patito-de-hule | Dec 20, 2008 |
This is a tremendous book by a tremendous man. As opinionated as Green can be, the book feels weirdly "open"—its very breadth an invitation to a thousand interesting topics—some of which, one feels, have not been studied enough. It easily stops a door and would probably stop a bullet. I wish it were longer. ( )
1 vote timspalding | Jun 9, 2008 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Dis Manibus
F. E. Adcock
G. T. Griffith
W. K. C. Guthrie
J. E. Raven
with gratitude for much wisdom freely shared, and in affectionate memory
First words
Preface and Acknowledgments -- The Hellenistic age has one great advantage for us: it is easily definable.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0520083490, Paperback)

The Hellenistic Age, the three extraordinary centuries from the death of Alexander in 323 B. C. to Octavian's final defeat of Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium, has offered a rich and variegated field of exploration for historians, philosophers, economists, and literary critics. Yet few scholars have attempted the daunting task of seeing the period whole, of refracting its achievements and reception through the lens of a single critical mind. Alexander to Actium was conceived and written to fill that gap.
In this monumental work, Peter Green--noted scholar, writer, and critic--breaks with the traditional practice of dividing the Hellenistic world into discrete, repetitious studies of Seleucids, Ptolemies, Antigonids, and Attalids. He instead treats these successor kingdoms as a single, evolving, interrelated continuum. The result clarifies the political picture as never before. With the help of over 200 illustrations, Green surveys every significant aspect of Hellenistic cultural development, from mathematics to medicine, from philosophy to religion, from literature to the visual arts.
Green offers a particularly trenchant analysis of what has been seen as the conscious dissemination in the East of Hellenistic culture, and finds it largely a myth fueled by Victorian scholars seeking justification for a no longer morally respectable imperialism. His work leaves us with a final impression of the Hellenistic Age as a world with haunting and disturbing resemblances to our own. This lively, personal survey of a period as colorful as it is complex will fascinate the general reader no less than students and scholars.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:18 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The Hellenistic Age, the three extraordinary centuries from the death of Alexander in 323 B. C. to Octavian's final defeat of Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium, has offered a rich and variegated field of exploration for historians, philosophers, economists, and literary critics. Yet few scholars have attempted the daunting task of seeing the period whole, of refracting its achievements and reception through the lens of a single critical mind. Alexander to Actium was conceived and written to fill that gap. In this monumental work, Peter Green--noted scholar, writer, and critic--breaks with the traditional practice of dividing the Hellenistic world into discrete, repetitious studies of Seleucids, Ptolemies, Antigonids, and Attalids. He instead treats these successor kingdoms as a single, evolving, interrelated continuum. The result clarifies the political picture as never before. With the help of over 200 illustrations, Green surveys every significant aspect of Hellenistic cultural development, from mathematics to medicine, from philosophy to religion, from literature to the visual arts. Green offers a particularly trenchant analysis of what has been seen as the conscious dissemination in the East of Hellenistic culture, and finds it largely a myth fueled by Victorian scholars seeking justification for a no longer morally respectable imperialism. His work leaves us with a final impression of the Hellenistic Age as a world with haunting and disturbing resemblances to our own. This lively, personal survey of a period as colorful as it is complex will fascinate the general reader no less than students and scholars.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.39)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 1
3.5
4 13
4.5 3
5 13

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,295,999 books! | Top bar: Always visible