HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second…
Loading...

The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789

by Joseph J. Ellis

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3471431,518 (4.09)23

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 23 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
Excellent study on what the author states as the "Second American Revolution", the development and ratification of the Constitution. Ellis puts the main proponents of the Constitution as well as the document itself in an historical perspective. ( )
  Waltersgn | Mar 30, 2017 |
During and after the Revolution, the thirteen former colonies were bound together under the Articles of Confederation -- an arrangement that Joseph Ellis argues was not the blueprint for a single nation, but for a confederation of independent states. In the eyes of much of the political elite of the time, the Articles proved to be a profoundly unsatisfactory blueprint. For one thing, it did not provide for any reliable financing; for another, it created no overall approach to foreign policy. Ellis argues that four members of the elite were particularly important in moving our governing framework to the next level -- that of a single nation.

In so doing, he makes the history of the first years after the Revolution fascinating, not the dull and blurry period I studied in high school. The Constitution, rather than a foreordained consequence of the Revolution, was an audacious proposal that in many ways contradicted the key goals of the Revolution, proposing a central government with many of the powers (including taxation) of the hated British government. How the proposal arose and how it was shepherded into being is a fascinating story. Clearly, Ellis' view contradicts some other approaches to the history of the constitution, but I found it convincing.

He also writes an entertaining book that is a pleasure to read. He brings his four central characters -- Washington, Madison, Jay, and Hamilton -- to life, strengthening the narrative and creating human interest. (Washington, in particular, steps down from his pedestal and comes alive). And many other characters appear, sharply drawn and set in the political context of the time. All in all, a terrific book. ( )
  annbury | Aug 3, 2016 |
(96) ( )
  activelearning | Jul 6, 2016 |
A wonderful book. Ellis explains how four individuals: Washington, Hamilton, Jay and Madison were so essential to the drafting of the Constitution and the birth of the US. The only complaint that I have, and it is small, is that the author does not explain how much the land was worth at the beginning of the country. It was worth a ton, obviously. Madison eventually hooked up with Jefferson and went against everything he had argued for. He is the real hero of the book. The author argues against original intent very well. ( )
  annbury | Feb 11, 2016 |
But for Madison, Washington, Hamilton, and Jay the author says there would have been no Constitution and no USA. Ellis makes a convincing case that these were the four that orchestrated the second American Revolution overthrowing the Articles of Confederation. It is hard looking back to think the USA almost did not happen. When you find out that Mass. had its own foreign policy you realize no one thought of themselves as Americans after the Revolutionary War. Even though Washington did not author any of the Federalist Papers, Ellis shows how he was the indispensable man. In reading this book I do wonder where was John Adams? I know Jefferson was in France. ( )
  jerry-book | Jan 26, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
In memory of Pauline Maier
First words
(Preface) The idea for this book first came to me while listening to twenty-eight middle school boys recite the Gettysburg Address from memory in front of their classmates and proud parents.
On March 1, 1781, three and a half years after they were endorsed by the Continental Congress, the Articles of Confederation were officially ratified when the last state, Maryland, gave its approval.
Quotations
Certain I am that unless Congress speaks in a more decisive tone; unless they are vested with powers by the several states competent to the great purposes of War . . . , that our cause is lost. . . . I see one head gradually changing into thirteen.
George Washington to Joseph Jones
May 31, 1780
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0385353405, Hardcover)

The prizewinning author of Founding Brothers and American Sphinx now gives us the unexpected story--brilliantly told--of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew.

The triumph of the American Revolution was neither an ideological nor political guarantee that the colonies would relinquish their independence and accept the creation of a federal government with power over their individual autonomy. The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men responsible--some familiar, such as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, and some less so, such as Robert Morris and Governeur Morris. It was these men who shaped the contours of American history by diagnosing the systemic dysfunctions created by the Articles of Confederation, manipulating the political process to force a calling of the Constitutional Convention, conspiring to set the agenda in Philadelphia, orchestrating the debate in the state ratifying conventions, and, finally, drafting the Bill of Rights to assure state compliance with the constitutional settlement.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:52 -0400)

"The prizewinning author of Founding Brothers and American Sphinx now gives us the unexpected story--brilliantly told--of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew. The triumph of the American Revolution was neither an ideological nor political guarantee that the colonies would relinquish their independence and accept the creation of a federal government with power over their individual autonomy. The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men responsible--some familiar, such as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, and some less so, such as Robert Morris and Governeur Morris. It was these men who shaped the contours of American history by diagnosing the systemic dysfunctions created by the Articles of Confederation, manipulating the political process to force a calling of the Constitutional Convention, conspiring to set the agenda in Philadelphia, orchestrating the debate in the state ratifying conventions, and, finally, drafting the Bill of Rights to assure state compliance with the constitutional settlement"--… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
94 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.09)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 6
3.5 3
4 21
4.5 7
5 12

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,992,644 books! | Top bar: Always visible