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Man's Search for Meaning by Ilse Lasch
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Man's Search for Meaning

by Ilse Lasch

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Showing 5 of 5
my words are not enough to define the brilliance of the writing;the story speaks for itself. history proves how reality is so much more hauting than nightmares. ( )
  M.Akter.Tonima | Nov 3, 2017 |
my words are not enough to define the brilliance of the writing;the story speaks for itself. history proves how reality is so much more hauting than nightmares. ( )
  M.Akter.Tonima | Nov 3, 2017 |
You find the meaning in yourself ...

Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl (1905-1997), an Austrian psychiatrist and neurologist who founded logotherapy. Frankl was a survivor of the Holocaust, having been imprisoned at the Auschwitz concentration camp, and later Kaufering and Durkheim (both affiliated with the Dachau concentration camp in Upper Bavaria) from October 1944 to April 1945. Having endured unspeakable suffering in the concentration camps, Frankl discovered meaning even in the most horrific, most dehumanizing situations. This belief, that there was meaning even in suffering, became one of the foundational concepts of logotherapy. According to Frankl, the striving to find meaning in life is the primary, most powerful motivating and driving force for all humans. ( )
  AntonioGallo | Nov 2, 2017 |
Have you ever had someone tell you that happiness is a choice you make? Well, I think it came from this book. Great perspective on the most terrible act of at least the 20th century. Read this book and it's like spending an evening with a holocaust survivor where he shortly and succinctly tells you his story, along with the general life lessons that he learned about happiness and survival. A classic for a reason.

The second half of the book is the author's theory (?) of logo therapy. I didn't read all of his second part because it wasn't what I was looking for and while reading it I wasn't enjoying it. ( )
  JaredChristopherson | Nov 16, 2015 |
This is a very important memoir/psychological theory. Took me back to my psychoanalysis classes back in my college days..

Everything can be taken from a man but one thing," Frankl wrote, "the last of the human freedoms -- to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way."

Of course that Frankl had the capacity to find hope and search for life's purpose during and after surviving such horrific experiences,is what makes this short memoir so remarkable. ( )
  irisper012106 | Nov 1, 2015 |
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