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The Civil War: A Narrative by Shelby Foote
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The Civil War: A Narrative

by Shelby Foote

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984108,727 (4.55)97
  1. 10
    The Coming Fury by Bruce Catton (oregonobsessionz)
    oregonobsessionz: Read Catton's Centennial History of the Civil War trilogy (The Coming Fury, Terrible Swift Sword, Never Call Retreat) for a Union- leaning perspective, and read Shelby Foote's The Civil War: A Narrative trilogy for a southern-leaning perspective.… (more)
  2. 00
    The Civil War : an illustrated history by Geoffrey C. Ward (justjim)
    justjim: A shorter treatment than the Foote work but with some wonderful illustrations. (Photographs, drawings and maps.
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» See also 97 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
I'm going to keep this simple. Reading this three volume set is one of the most important things I have done in my life. You cannot understand America until you understand the Civil War. And this is THE source to read/listen to in order to gain that understanding. ( )
  Scarchin | Nov 12, 2013 |
The Author's of "1066 and All That" said very justly that Civil Wars usually are between two sides the "Wrong but Romantic, and the Right but Repulsive!" I feel Mr. Foote has fallen prey to the wrong but romantic in his book, but that it is a necessary part of any ACW buff's library. It's readable, and slightly pro-Southern, but is a masterly synthesis of a vast catastrophe. I find myself dipping into it often. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Sep 11, 2013 |
I have read these volumes (I have two sets of them for some reason) and also have the Audible.com versions, and I enjoy listening to them. Foote has created an historical tour de force, but even more impressive for me is the sheer artistry of his narrative. His command of the language is so good it sometimes obscures the narrative. You can be distracted from the message by the beauty and creativity of the medium. It's all good. You can go back and get the facts with a reread or somewhere else. But you only get this kind of literary thrill in great literature. Like many others I was first introduced to Foote in the Ken Burns documentary series on the Civil War. Next to the music, (Bernice Johnson Reagon for example), discovering Foote was the best part of that very good treatment. I've only read one of Foote's novels, but his whole body of work is on my bucket list. A magnificent story teller. ( )
  Coalsoffire | Dec 11, 2012 |
DGAYAA
  JohnMeeks | Jun 26, 2010 |
I couldn't find a listing for just Volume 3: Red River to Appomattox which I finished this year. Last year I read the first two volumes. This is the last volume which covered Grant arriving in Washington to take up duties as commander—and looking like a scruffy nonentity who was offered a room in the attic of Willard’s Hotel until the clerk saw his name—to the death of Jefferson Davis (Foote is a southerner after all). Really great work—it’s taken me a couple of years to read it.There I think Foote focused on the South more, but not to the extent of being unfair. I was amazed that the death of Lincoln was treated relatively perfunctorily--but it may be that I was disappointed because I had been so wrapped up in the assassination details and the plot details (to kill Seward and Stanton too) in Goodwin's Team of Rivals, which I had just read, that this one seemed decidedly minimilist. And the book ended with Jefferson Davis going back to Mississippi--actually it ended with the death of Davis many years later as if only then was the war really over! I gathered there was considerable admiration for Davis on Foote's part. Me, I'd never considered Davis as a person at all. I had considered Alexander Stephens (partly because that was my husband's name). Something else I read awhile ago (possibly McPherson) detailed his friendship with Lincoln when they were both together in Congress many years before.I'm not one for military details, but I found Foote's focus on "mistakes" of southern generals like Hood and Johnson (always forget whether it was Johnson or Johnston--I mean Joseph Johnson) interesting. They seemed to do little right while Sherman did everything right and I sense there was even some affection for him on Foote's part. And I was surprised that he didn't make as much as other histories I've read of the possibility of generals not surrendering and continuing a guerilla war for years. I thought he downplayed Nathan Bedford Forrest too, in that regard but also just as a Southern hero.Still I'm no Civil War expert and no matter how hard I try, it's the people and the human events that engage me more than the battles and the strategy. Foote is very good at that. If Red River to Appomattox ended with the death of Jefferson Davis, it began with Grant's coming to Washington and being taken for a run-of-the-mill nonentity general when he asked for a room at Willard's hotel--until he signed his name. I'd not have persisted through all the battles if his dealing with people and his ability to conjure up memorable vignettes were not so good. ( )
1 vote fourbears | Apr 24, 2010 |
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Contains

The Civil War, a narrative : Fort Sumter to Perryville by Shelby Foote

The Civil War, Vol 1: Fort Sumter to Kernstown: First Blood - The Thing Gets Underway by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War: A Narrative Pea Ridge to the Seven Days War Means Fighting, Fighting Means Killing (Volume 2) by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War: A Narrative Second Manassas to Perryville The Sun Shines South (Volume 3) by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Secession to Fort Henry by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Fort Donelson to Memphis by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Yorktown to Cedar Mountain by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Second Manassas to Pocataligo by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, A Narrative: Fredericksburg to Meridian by Shelby Foote

The Beleaguered City: The Vicksburg Campaign, December 1862-July 1863 (Modern Library) by Shelby Foote (indirect)

Stars in Their Courses : The Gettysburg Campaign, June-July 1863 by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Fredericksburg to Chancellorsville by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Gettysburg to Vicksburg by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, A Narrative, Tullahoma to Meridian, Riot and Resurgence by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Fredericksburg to Steele Bayou by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Charleston Harbor to Vicksburg by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Gettysburg to Draft Riots by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Tullahoma to Missionary Ridge by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Mine Run to Meridian by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Red River to Appomattox by Shelby Foote

The Civil War, a narrative : Red River to Chattahoochee by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Petersburg to Savannah by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War: A Narrative: Five Forks to Appomattox: Victory and Defeat (# 9 in series) by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Red River to Spotsylvania by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Yellow Tavern to Cold Harbor by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : James Crossing to Johnsville by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Petersburg Siege to Bentonville by Shelby Foote (indirect)

The Civil War, a narrative : Fort Stedman to Reconstruction by Shelby Foote (indirect)

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Epigraph
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First words
Eastward, with Lee at last out-foxed, the blue tide ran swift and steady, apparently inexorable as it surged toward the gates of the capital close in his rear.
Quotations
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the entry for a complete omnibus/3 volume set of THE CIVIL WAR: A NARRATIVE. Please do not combine with any individual volume or set.
Shelby Foote's The Civil War: A Narrative is most often published in three volumes. It is not clear from the title whether this work represents the entire trilogy, or just a single volume. If your book appears on this page, you may want to add detail to your title, so your book will combine with the appropriate volume or with the set.
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Wikipedia in English (66)

5th Independent Battery Indiana Light Artillery

68th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment

Alfred N. Duffié

American Civil War

Appomattox Campaign

Atlanta Campaign

Battle of Stones River

Battle of the Wilderness

Benjamin Franklin Butler (politician)

Benjamin Huger (general)

Braxton Bragg

Confederate Heartland Offensive

Leonidas Polk

Lewis Armistead

List of engineers educated at the United States Military Academy

List of Union Army officers educated at the United States Military Academy

Nathaniel P. Banks

Nicholas M. Nolan

Book description
All 3 books and dust covers are in excellent shape; however, this set no longer has the original box shown on the photo.  Section 2, Row 1
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0394749138, Paperback)

This beautifully written trilogy of books on the American Civil War is not only a piece of first-rate history, but also a marvelous work of literature. Shelby Foote brings a skilled novelist's narrative power to this great epic. Many know Foote for his prominent role as a commentator on Ken Burns's PBS series about the Civil War. These three books, however, are his legacy. His southern sympathies are apparent: the first volume opens by introducing Confederate President Jefferson Davis, rather than Abraham Lincoln. But they hardly get in the way of the great story Foote tells. This hefty three volume set should be on the bookshelf of any Civil War buff. --John Miller

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:51:35 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Volume two of a three volume narrative history of the battles, characters and situations during the middle portion of the war.

» see all 3 descriptions

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