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Moby Dick. by Herman Melville
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Moby Dick. (edition 2003)

by Herman Melville

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20,47331873 (3.83)6 / 1056
Member:letseatgrandpa
Title:Moby Dick.
Authors:Herman Melville
Info:Btb Bei Goldmann (2003), Paperback, 1056 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work details

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

  1. 131
    The Sea Wolf by Jack London (wvlibrarydude)
  2. 120
    In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex by Nathaniel Philbrick (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex tells the true story that inspired Melville to write Moby Dick.
  3. 80
    Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad (_eskarina)
  4. 50
    Leviathan or, The Whale by Philip Hoare (chrisharpe, John_Vaughan)
  5. 50
    The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket by Edgar Allan Poe (caflores)
  6. 41
    Two Years Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana (knownever)
    knownever: A more enjoyable, shorter, and less allegorical story of sailing life, although there aren't any whales. The author of this one kind of looks down on whalers. All together a more jaunty sea tale.
  7. 41
    Why Read Moby-Dick? by Nathaniel Philbrick (John_Vaughan)
  8. 31
    Railsea by China Miéville (Longshanks)
    Longshanks: An imaginative, affectionate pastiche of the novel's themes, imagery, and characters.
  9. 20
    The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway (caflores)
  10. 32
    The Myth of Sisyphus and other essays by Albert Camus (WilfGehlen)
    WilfGehlen: Camus was greatly influenced by Melville and in The Myth of Sisyphus mentions Moby-Dick as a truly absurd work. Reading Moby-Dick with Camus' absurd in mind gives a deeper, and very different insight than provided by the usual emphasis on Ahab's quest for revenge.… (more)
  11. 21
    Genoa: A Telling of Wonders by Paul Metcalf (rickyrickyricky)
    rickyrickyricky: Melville's heir struggles to close his relationship to his preceding literary genius. Click the link above, read what you can, and get yourself hooked on one of the most critically-adored yet criminally-underread novels written in a century defined by self-analysis and experimentation.… (more)
  12. 43
    Ahab's Wife by Sena Jeter Naslund (ecleirs24, AriadneAranea)
    ecleirs24: Cause this novel is based upon a passage from Mobi Dick......
  13. 22
    The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade by Herman Melville (GaryPatella)
    GaryPatella: Compared to Moby Dick, The Confidence Man is a much lighter read. But after ploughing through Moby Dick, this may be a welcome change. It is not as profound, but you also don't have to struggle through any of it. This is worth reading.
  14. 11
    The Last Fish Tale by Mark Kurlansky (John_Vaughan)
  15. 11
    Oil! by Upton Sinclair (edwinbcn)
  16. 22
    Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner (ateolf)
  17. 33
    Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham (JGKC)
  18. 11
    The Nautical Chart by Arturo Pérez-Reverte (Ronoc)
  19. 23
    Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian (caflores)
    caflores: Para amantes del lenguaje náutico y de las descripciones detalladas.
  20. 14
    Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon (ateolf)

(see all 23 recommendations)

Romans (14)
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English (286)  German (9)  Dutch (7)  Spanish (5)  French (2)  Italian (2)  Norwegian (2)  Catalan (2)  Danish (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (318)
Showing 1-5 of 286 (next | show all)
Lê-lo até o fim costuma ser uma façanha. O meio do livro é realmente insuportável --- com seus enlouquecedores relatos de caça às baleias. Mas, (como Adam Roberts escreveu) "mesmo o tema mais maçante oferece a Melville a oportunidade de brilhar na escrita. Ele é fantástico. [...] É revelador que Moby Dick não apareça antes da página 494. A maior parte do livro é gasta em antecipação --- na verdade, o romance todo é uma antecipação. Nenhuma das perguntas antecipadas é respondida, afinal. Que fim levou Ismael, o narrador? No começo, ele interage com Queequeg e um estalajadeiro, depois, perdemo-lo de vista a bordo do Pequod --- onde não interage com quem quer que seja. Ninguém jamais se dirige a ele, que parece testemunhar eventos extremamente privados --- conferências nos aposentos do capitão, conversas a bordo de vários barcos, e - o que só pode ser conjectura - diálogos internos de outros personagens. Ismael é um fantasma? O que é e o que não é? De alguma forma, estas questões mascaram uma maior e mais importante. Nas palavras de Ismael: "Eu tento de tudo, logro o que posso." ( )
  jgcorrea | Apr 24, 2015 |
The writing was good but there was just too much of it. It felt like the author was one of those people at a party who really drag their stories out; thinking they're been dramatic and entertaining but they're just being boring. This definitely wasn't a story that keeps you on the edge of your seat. ( )
  jimocracy | Apr 18, 2015 |
Moby Dick is one of those books, like War and Peace, that kind of separates the serious reader from the airport novel consumer. It’s not like Proust, which even serious readers have second thoughts about tackling; it’s more commonly known and thus more commonly feared.

I didn’t find it a difficult read at all actually. That’s, thankfully, because Melville keeps conversational interchanges to a minimum. The guy absolutely could not write conversation. Most characters babble away to themselves as if they’ve just consumed a pint of LSD and are having the trip of their lifetimes. By the end of the book, I was skim reading anything in quotes I came across. It was all, up to that point, meaningless and lent nothing at all to the novel except to reinforce my belief that, to embark on a whaler, you had to have at least one screw, if not several, very loose indeed.

The eponymous Ishmael from the famous opening line embarks on a whaler after an amusing incident with what he regards as a cannibal in an inn on the Nantucket coast. Cherish this moment. It’s pretty much the last amusing incident for another 600 pages.

We then come to know the Pequod, for that is the ship’s name, pretty well as Melville uses Ishmael as his amanuensis to both tell the story of Capt. Ahab’s hunt for the whale that removed his leg and also, mostly actually, tell us everything there is to know about both whales and the process of whaling.

I found most of this pretty interesting, but I can understand why many do not. I actually found the storyline a bit thin and the less said about the aforementioned dialogue the better. So, I was glad to actually learn a great deal about what was understood about whales at the time and to get a glimpse of a mammal that has all but disappeared and a way of life which has all but disappeared with it. Judging from the one quote I gathered along the way however (see below), I’m not so sure that’s a bad thing.

Melville never profited from the novel in his lifetime. In actual fact, many didn’t like it and his reputation took quite a blow from the bad British reviews that influenced US public opinion. This is understandable in a way. Many might find the novel is not an easy read. It combines several different styles of writing in, at the time, a unique way which is often hard to follow. It is though a piece of writing which shows that the novel can be a very flexible art form indeed and one which becomes an important part of our collective history. ( )
  arukiyomi | Apr 17, 2015 |
A good read, with strong, vivid characters. Also an interesting insight into the whaling industry of the time. ( )
  ajsendall | Apr 5, 2015 |
A good read, with strong, vivid characters. Also an interesting insight into the whaling industry of the time. ( )
  ajsendall | Apr 5, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 286 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (163 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Melville, Hermanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adler, Mortimer J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beaver, Harold LowtherEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
D'Agostino, NemiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Delbanco, AndrewIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fadiman, CliftonIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jendis, MatthiasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kent, RockwellIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muller, FrankNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mummendey, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pavese, CesareTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Quirk, TomCommentarysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rathjen, FriedhelmTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robinson, BoardmanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schaeffer, MeadIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Turner, J.M.W.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Walcutt, Charles ChildEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
There Leviathan, Hugest of living creatures, in the deep / Stretch'd like a promontory sleeps or swims, / And seems a moving land; and at his gills / Draws in, and at his breath spouts out a sea. PARADISE LOST
Dedication
In token

of my admiration for his genius,

This Book is Inscribed

to

Nathaniel Hawthorne.
First words
Call me Ishmael. Some years ago - never mind how long precisely - having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world.
Quotations
Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people's hats off -- then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can. ...from Chapter 1 : Loomings
"If they but knew it, almost all men in their degree, some time or other, cherish nearly the same feelings towards the ocean with me."
All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event--in the living act, the undoubted deed--there, some unknown but still reasoning thing put forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there's naught beyond. But 'tis enough.
To the last I grapple with thee; from hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Please do not combine adaptations or abridged editions of Moby Dick with unabridged versions. Versions aimed at children are normally abridged editions and should not be combined here. Also, books ABOUT Moby Dick (such as study guides) should not be combined with the unabridged nor the abridged novel. Please keep such books as an independent work.
The Penguin Classics 150th Anniversary Ed (ISBN 0142000086) is not abridged, although that word has appeared in some user's data.
Norton Critical editions, Longman Critical editions and other scholarly editions should not be combined with the unabridged novel. The scholarly-type editions contain much additional material so they should be considered as separate works.
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Book description
1851 : Moby-Dick published

On this day in 1851, Moby-Dick, a novel by Herman Melville about the
voyage of the whaling ship Pequod, is published by Harper & Brothers
in New York. Moby-Dick is now considered a great classic of American
literature and contains one of the most famous opening lines in
fiction: "Call me Ishmael." Initially, though, the book about Captain
Ahab and his quest for a giant white whale was a flop.

Herman Melville was born in New York City in 1819 and as a young man
spent time in the merchant marines, the U.S. Navy and on a whaling
ship in the South Seas. In 1846, he published his first novel, Typee,
a romantic adventure based on his experiences in Polynesia. The book
was a success and a sequel, Omoo, was published in 1847. Three more
novels followed, with mixed critical and commercial results.
Melville's sixth book, Moby-Dick, was first published in October 1951
in London, in three volumes titled The Whale, and then in the U.S. a
month later. Melville had promised his publisher an adventure story
similar to his popular earlier works, but instead, Moby-Dick was a
tragic epic, influenced in part by Melville's friend and Pittsfield,
Massachusetts, neighbor, Nathaniel Hawthorne, whose novels include The
Scarlet Letter.

After Moby-Dick's disappointing reception, Melville continued to
produce novels, short stories (Bartleby) and poetry, but writing
wasn't paying the bills so in 1865 he returned to New York to work as
a customs inspector, a job he held for 20 years.

Melville died in 1891, largely forgotten by the literary world. By the
1920s, scholars had rediscovered his work, particularly Moby-Dick,
which would eventually become a staple of high school reading lists
across the United States. Billy Budd, Melville's final novel, was
published in 1924, 33 years after his death.

*Note: Information provided by History.com
Haiku summary
Call me Ishmael.
Score: Whale 1, Ahab 0.
I alone returned.
(bertilak)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0142437247, Paperback)


Over a century and a half after its publication, Moby-Dick still stands as an indisputable literary classic. It is the story of an eerily compelling madman pursuing an unholy war against a creature as vast and dangerous and unknowable as the sea itself. But more than just a novel of adventure, more than an encyclopedia of whaling lore and legend, Moby-Dick is a haunting, mesmerizing, and important social commentary populated with several of the most unforgettable and enduring characters in literature. Written with wonderfully redemptive humor, Moby-Dick is a profound and timeless inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception.


@greatwhitetale Call me Ishmael. You could call me something else if you want, but since that’s my name, it would make sense to call me Ishmael.

Captain obsessed with finding a whale called Moby Dick. Sounds like the meanest VD ever, if you ask me. Sorry. Old joke. Couldn’t resist.

From Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books in Twenty Tweets or Less

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:38:50 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Moby-Dick] is an 1851 novel by Herman Melville. The story tells the adventures of the wandering sailor Ishmael and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ishmael soon learns that Ahab seeks one specific whale, Moby Dick, a white whale of tremendous size and ferocity. Comparatively few whaleships know of Moby Dick, and fewer yet have encountered him. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab's boat and bit off his leg. Ahab intends to take revenge. -- Wikipedia.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 59 descriptions

Legacy Library: Herman Melville

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4 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0142437247, 0142000086, 0143105957, 0141198958

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