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Did God Really Command Genocide?: Coming to…
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Did God Really Command Genocide?: Coming to Terms with the Justice of God (edition 2014)

by Paul Copan (Author)

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Member:tim.dieppe
Title:Did God Really Command Genocide?: Coming to Terms with the Justice of God
Authors:Paul Copan (Author)
Info:Baker Books (2014), 352 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:Genocide, Joshuah, Apologetics, Canaanites

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Did God Really Command Genocide?: Coming to Terms with the Justice of God by Paul Copan

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Paul Copanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Flannagan, Mattmain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0801016223, Paperback)

A common objection to belief in the God of the Bible is that a good, kind, and loving deity would never command the wholesale slaughter of nations. Even Christians have a hard time stomaching such a thought, and many avoid reading those difficult Old Testament passages that make us squeamish. Instead, we quickly jump to the enemy-loving, forgiving Jesus of the New Testament. And yet, the question doesn't go away. Did God really command genocide? Is the command to "utterly destroy" morally unjustifiable? Is it literal? Are the issues more complex and nuanced than we realize?

In the tradition of his popular Is God a Moral Monster?, Paul Copan teams up with Matthew Flannagan to tackle some of the most confusing and uncomfortable passages of Scripture. Together they help the Christian and nonbeliever alike understand the biblical, theological, philosophical, and ethical implications of Old Testament warfare passages. Pastors, youth pastors, campus ministers, apologetics readers, and laypeople will find that this book both enlightens and equips them for serious discussion of troubling spiritual questions.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:50 -0400)

A common objection to belief in the God of the Bible is that a good, kind, and loving deity would never command the wholesale slaughter of nations. Even Christians have a hard time stomaching such a thought, and many avoid reading those difficult Old Testament passages that make us squeamish. Instead, we quickly jump to the enemy-loving, forgiving Jesus of the New Testament. And yet, the question doesn't go away. Did God really command genocide? Is the command to "utterly destroy" morally unjustifiable? Is it literal? Are the issues more complex and nuanced than we realize? In the tradition of his popular Is God a Moral Monster?, Paul Copan teams up with Matthew Flannagan to tackle some of the most confusing and uncomfortable passages of Scripture. Together they help the Christian and nonbeliever alike understand the biblical, theological, philosophical, and ethical implications of Old Testament warfare passages. Pastors, youth pastors, campus ministers, apologetics readers, and laypeople will find that this book both enlightens and equips them for serious discussion of troubling spiritual questions.… (more)

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