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Died in the Wool (Torie O'Shea…
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Died in the Wool (Torie O'Shea Mysteries) (edition 2007)

by Rett MacPherson

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915191,199 (3.83)1
Member:eleighb85
Title:Died in the Wool (Torie O'Shea Mysteries)
Authors:Rett MacPherson
Info:Minotaur Books (2007), Hardcover, 240 pages
Collections:Your library
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Died in the Wool by Rett MacPherson

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Showing 5 of 5
A rose show shouldn't cause murder but there is a possibility that the one Tori O'Shea is in charge of did. Not to mention she is buying what many consider a haunted house of vast proportions.

Tori, her family and the town of New Kassel, Missouri were a delight to read about. This happens to be book #10 in this series, but no matter - you can jump right in and learn as you go. The house Tori wants to buy is an old Victorian in which all three siblings killed themselves. This didn't happen recently but it is a draw since on of the siblings was a very well=known quilter and left many of her quilts in the house.

Quilts. Roses. Murder. Suicide. A great way to spend a few evenings! ( )
  macygma | Sep 11, 2016 |
Torie is busy, as usual. She is helping to organize a Roses weekend, even though she knows nothing about roses. Her three kids are growing fast and the two oldest are in the "teen" years. Early in the book she admits to being a bit bored and lo and behold a new project pops up. An historical house comes up for sale and Torie wants it. The house has a terrible story attached to it, all three children of the original owner committed suicide. The daughter also happens to have been a fantastic needlework artist, especially with quilts. Torie goes from wanting the house for its historical value to wanting the house for its historical value and potential use as a textile museum specializing in women's quilting and needle arts.

Of course, she also has to investigate the family and find out why three adult children committed suicide. One is easy, the youngest son came back from WWI tormented and suffering from severe post-tramatic stress (not that they knew to call it that back then). But, why the other two.

As Tori works her way through this mystery she is also slowly redefining her relationship with step-father Colin.

A most enjoyable episode in this delightful series.

( )
  bookswoman | Mar 31, 2013 |
Died in the Wool by Rett MacPherson is further proof than an author can indeed start a series, create a number of works following the adventures and exploits of one individual, and still maintain the quality of the first book in said series. I have read eight Torie O’Shea Mysteries now, and to be honest, they just get better and better.

As with most of her other works, the setting is in a small river town, south of St. Louis. In this story, our heroine gets involved in a triple suicide that occurred shortly after the First World War. Three siblings, two brothers and a sister commit suicide within a very short time. Years later, as Torie plans to buy the wonderful old house and turn it into a quilting and fabric museum, she, as is her nature, comes across some very strange happenings, or coincidences as she accomplishes her genealogical research. Was it suicide, or was it murder? If you are a follower of this series, you will know that Torie just cannot leave a question, any question, unanswered. She may drive half a dozen people nuts, but she will find the answers she is looking for.

The Tories O’Shea Mysteries are cozy mysteries through and though. The author has certainly mastered this particular genre. In this work she has woven quilting, roses, genealogy, family, and the regular characters in her village into a nicely done little mystery that actually takes some thinking on the reader’s part. The author has stayed true to her characters as with the other books in this series. Her writing style, rather than getting sloppy, as we often see in “series books” has improved…she is getting better and better with each novel. This is impressive, as I thought her first effort was quite out of the ordinary for a new author. Obviously a lot of research and time has gone into creating this delightful story. I do wish that more of our first line authors stuck with quality writing, and well thought out stories as MacPherson has with all of her novels. We would all be much better off for it.

For a nice, interesting, humorous, informative, and well…cozy read, I cannot recommend this one highly enough. Do be warned though, this is one of those that once you read the first couple of pages, you will be hooked and will find the book difficult to put down.

Don Blankenship
The Ozarks ( )
  theancientreader | Jan 27, 2009 |
When the Kendall house comes up for sale, local historian Torie O'Shea dreams of buying the property and turning it into a textile museum. Naturally, the quilts of Glory Kendall, a talented quilter and a former resident of the house, will feature prominently in the textile collection. The house holds secrets, though. What drove Glory and her two brothers to suicide within months of each other? Torie can't resist probing the 85-year-old mystery. This volume in the Torie O'Shea series offers something for hobbyists of all stripes. In addition to the expected genealogical aspect to the mystery, quilting, gardening, and even fishing also play a part in the novel. ( )
2 vote cbl_tn | Jul 6, 2008 |
Showing 5 of 5
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rett MacPhersonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lange, JoeAuthor photosecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Perry, TamayeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
This book is for my husband
who lives with my little quirks--like never having enough
roses, or enough quilts, or enough fabric, or enough
books--and manages not to complain, too much. And who
at the end of the day still considers me "his woman."

And for the amazing women on my family tree who passed
the love of quilts and quilting down to me either through
their written record or through the record of their craft.
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It was springtime in New Kassel.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312362218, Hardcover)

With the Garden Club's First Annual Rose Show right around the corner and a historic house up for sale, Torie O'Shea, mother of three and president of the historical society in New Kassel, Missouri, has her hands full.
 
Nosy by nature, Torie can't help but poke around the old Kendall house, rumored to contain rare Civil War artifacts and even rarer quilts that would make fantastic additions to the historic Gaheimer House that Torie runs. But why stop there when the house itself would make such a wonderful addition to New Kassel's historical homes? It could even become a textile museum. Sadly, the house's history is as tragic as it is rich: In the 1920s, three twenty-something siblings committed suicide, and the more Torie uncovers, the more involved she becomes.
 
Her curiosity draws her into some dark places, but it's a present-day crime that sends her racing to unravel exactly what happened to those three siblings before anyone turns up dead.
 
The brilliant patchwork of characters and tightly stitched plots in Rett MacPherson's Died in the Wool will delight fans of this terrific series and win over new ones.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:38 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"With the garden club's first Annual Rose show right around the corner and a historic house up for sale, Torie O'Shea, mother of three and president of the historical society in New Kassel, Missouri, has her hands full." "Nosy by nature, Torie can't help but poke around the old Kendall house, rumored to contain rare Civil War artifacts and even rarer quilts that would make fantastic additions to the historic Gaheimer House that Torie runs. But why stop there when the house itself would make such a wonderful addition to New Kassel's historical homes? It could even become a textile museum. Sadly, the house's history is as tragic as it is rich: In the 1920s, three twenty-something siblings committed suicide there, and the more Torie uncovers, the more involved she becomes." "Her curiosity draws her into some dark places, but it's a present-day crime that sends her racing to unravel exactly -what happened to those three siblings before anyone turns up dead."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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