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The Quick and Easy Way to Effective Speaking…
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The Quick and Easy Way to Effective Speaking (1962)

by Dale Carnegie

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Since so many people are afraid of public speaking, this may be the most important book that Dale Carnegie ever wrote. He teaches you a set of simple truths that you should have been taught in first grade, or maybe kindergarten. For example, the audience you're speaking to isn't rooting for you to fail. Think about how uncomfortable you feel watching a speaker who is struggling. You are always rooting for the speaker to be fluent and interesting, and so is the audience you're speaking to. Another obvious truth that needs to be taught to prospective speakers is that if you have something you really want to tell others, you will be able to overcome your fear and speak to them about it, even in public. For example, if you were asked to give a speech about your favorite football team and why they were your favorite, you probably wouldn't have any trouble at all. If you were asked to give a speech about King Henry IV of England, you probably wouldn't do so well. So if you are one of those people who is deathly afraid of public speaking, go out and buy this book immediately. You won't regret your decision. ( )
  datrappert | Nov 20, 2013 |
Dale Carengie's straightforward down to earth style is refreshing and impressive. His fondness for the anecdotal is reminiscent of that great American which Carnegie so often quotes - Abraham Lincoln. Others of Carnegie's favorite go to men include Jesus and the Word, Professor William James, Franklin Delano Rossevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill, Norman Vincent Peale and Confucius. Most illuminating however are the examples of speech given from people of all walks of life who have taken Carnegie's courses, viz., politicians, businessmen, stay-at-home mothers and various reformed introverts.

"Effective Speaking" is exquisitely outlined, from "Acquiring the Basic Skills" all the way through to "Applying What You Have Learned". Carnegie comes across not as some self-help guru with a self-formulated system for success, but rather Carnegie seems a close friend and mentor who shares his intimate knowledge in earnest with the reader; knowledge which is a culmination of common sense and experience, which all see as practicable and of great value.

What is it exactly that I have learned? Begin in medias res - jump into the action, and do so passionately. As Carnegie does, speak from experience. Be excited about your topic. Never attempt to memorize a speech. Always prepare beforehand, amassing much more information than you could possibly use. As Aristotle said, "Think as Wise men do, but speak as common people do.

Carnegie has settled a conundrum I was facing. I had my paper written out in literary form and fashion. How to deliver it? The answer is to NOT READ IT. Become so familiar with it, that you can speak knowledgeably, hitting all points, simply from basic notes. One must be human when speaking publicly, addressing the audience as one would a single conversant.

I read this in preparation for giving my testimony to my church's youth group. That's coming up in 17 days. In that time, I will abide by the rules of this book in the construction of my testimony. I think it will go well. The most important concept Carnegie relays to the reader is to own confidence. One must have the confidence that one will become an effective speaker, and within the contents of this book, success is guaranteed. I cannot fail! If my speech doesn't go over to good, I must seek out the next opportunity and put my heart and mind into it! ( )
1 vote endersreads | Aug 11, 2011 |
A must have on everyone's reference shelf. If you even think you might have to do any public speaking, you must read this one. Better yet, take the Dale Course. Pricy but well worth the money. It pays big dividends. ( )
  ryoung | May 5, 2009 |
Most books on public speaking and presentation deal with the speaking aspects, I took the Carnegie courses and was expecting more of the same but was pleasantly surprised. I think anyone who uses this book will be too. The Carnegie approach goes beyond the usual presentation advice and addresses personality and human approach. One not only learns to deal with groups, but to improve one’s skills when dealing with another person one-on-one. ( )
  muzzie | May 17, 2008 |
It delivers on the title. Worth reading or reviewing. I first read it as part of a Dale Carnegie class, which referenced the book frequently. ( )
  jpsnow | Feb 9, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0671724002, Mass Market Paperback)

Now streamlined and updated, the book that has literally put millions on the highway to greater accomplishment and success can show you how to have maximum impact as a speaker--every day, and in every situation that demands winning others over to your point of view.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:30 -0400)

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