HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight…
Loading...

Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights

by Salman Rushdie

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8245616,717 (3.5)52
Recently added byelectrascaife, irasobrietate, Melej23, JayEales, DougJMN, FourFreedoms, private library, mpedja
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 52 mentions

English (56)  German (1)  All languages (57)
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
This one has everything that I should love about a novel: jinn in the modern world, a unique reworking of favorite folktales and fairytales, stories within stories, and an author who is capable of gorgeous wordsmithery. But, well, it just didn't work for me. And that makes me pretty sad. I was so looking forward to a Rushdie version of 1001 Nights, but I didn't like any of the characters and got impatient with the slowness of the prose. Maybe it's just me? At any rate, I won't give up on Rushdie because he's swept me off my feet in the past and I remain hopeful that I'll find that magic with him again. ( )
  electrascaife | Jun 15, 2019 |
This is the best piece of literary fiction I have ever read. From Harry Potter to ancient philosophers to dark Wizards and Genies, in third person omniscient narrative, the concepts of force and argument where reason is really not allowed, to love and the death of Love are shown with both humor and poetic fashion sense , as human beings are described as those who tell stories to understand themselves. Excellent modern day answer to the 1001 Arabian Nights. ( )
  FourFreedoms | May 17, 2019 |
Of course he can write and I'd rather read sentences crafted by Sir Salman than perhaps any other living writer, but I got a bit lost in this giant battle of the Jinn. I know that there were metaphors going on here but they wore me out a bit. I've had better times reading Rushdie than this. ( )
  asxz | Mar 13, 2019 |
If you haven’t read Salman Rushdie before, this book isn’t the place to start – you absolutely have to start with the incredible Midnight’s Children. That’s where you can develop a taste for his way of exploring elemental questions about humanity through fantastical characters in a comedic voice I think of as ‘goofy courtly’. Once you’re sold on that you can get past the fact that this book doesn’t have a traditional narrative storyline or character development. Instead it’s a series of overlapping tales that take their time getting told, and build to a war between blind faith and rationality that ends happily – kind of. My one quibble with this book is that the male heroes are all at the far end of middle age and ordinary looking (like the author), but their heroine lovers are all young and beautiful. It’s bordering on pervy. I wish Rushdie would let his heroines age - he's such a marvelous writer, he could do better by his female characters.

( )
  badube | Mar 6, 2019 |
This is the best piece of literary fiction I have ever read. From Harry Potter to ancient philosophers to dark Wizards and Genies, in third person omniscient narrative, the concepts of force and argument where reason is really not allowed, to love and the death of Love are shown with both humor and poetic fashion sense , as human beings are described as those who tell stories to understand themselves. Excellent modern day answer to the 1001 Arabian Nights. ( )
  ShiraDest | Mar 6, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
What's frustrating is to see glimpses of Rushdie's very real talent. Lines stand out, a wife who "slipped out of history" when her husband abandoned her, "he took it with him when he left," an "old town of salmon minarets and enigmatic walls," a "heart filled with something that might have been happiness, but poured out of his eyes as grief." But this is his second extremely bad book in a row — consult Zoë Heller's incineration of his memoir "Joseph Anton," for further detail — and it's beginning to seem as if that talent may be in permanent arrest.
added by ozzer | editChicago Tribune, Charles Finch (Sep 2, 2015)
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Salman Rushdieprimary authorall editionscalculated
Flabbi, LorenzoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
El sueno de la razon produce monstruos. The sleep of reason brings forth monsters. (Los Caprichos no. 43, by Francisco de Goya; the full caption in the Prado etching reads: "Fantasy abandoned by reason produces impossible monsters: united with her, she is the mother of the arts and the origin of their marvels.")
Dedication
First words
Very little is known, though much has been written, about the true nature of the jinn, the creatures made of smokeless fire.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
From one of the greatest writers of our time: the most spellbinding, entertaining, wildly imaginative novel of his great career, which blends history and myth with tremendous philosophical depth. A masterful, mesmerizing modern tale about worlds dangerously colliding, the monsters that are unleashed when reason recedes, and a beautiful testament to the power of love and humanity in chaotic times.

Inspired by 2,000 years of storytelling yet rooted in the concerns of our present moment, this is a spectacular achievement--enchanting, both very funny and terrifying. It is narrated by our descendants 1000 years hence, looking back on "The War of the Worlds" that began with "the time of the strangenesses": a simple gardener begins to levitate; a baby is born with the unnerving ability to detect corruption in people; the ghosts of two long-dead philosophers begin arguing once more; and storms pummel New York so hard that a crack appears in the universe, letting in the destructive djinns of myth (as well as some graphic superheroes). Nothing less than the survival of our world is at stake. Only one, a djinn princess who centuries before had learned to love humankind, resolves to help us: in the face of dynastic intrigue, she raises an army composed of her semi-magical great-great--etc.--grandchildren--a motley crew of endearing characters who come together to save the world in a battle waged for 1,001 nights--or, to be precise, two years, eight months and twenty-eight nights.
Haiku summary
Dschinn kämpft gegen Dschinn
Chaos in unserer Welt
so wurde erzählt
(hatorikibble)

No descriptions found.

(see all 2 descriptions)

"From Salman Rushdie, one of the great writers of our time, comes a spellbinding novel that blends history, mythology, and a timeless love story. A lush modern fairytale in which our world has been plunged into an age of unreason, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights is a breathtaking achievement and an enduring testament to the power of storytelling"--"Once upon a time, in a world just like ours, there came "the time of the strangenesses." Reason receded and the loudest, most illiberal voices reigned. A simple gardener began to levitate, and a powerful djinn -- also known as the Princess of Fairyland -- raised an army composed entirely of her semi-magical great-great-great-grandchildren. A baby was born with the ability to see corruption in the faces of others. The ghosts of two philosophers, long dead, began arguing once more. And a battle for the kingdom of Fairyland was waged throughout our world for 1,001 nights -- or, to be more precise, for two years, eight months, and twenty-eight nights. Two Years, Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights is a masterful, playfully enchanting meditation on the power of love and the importance of rationality, replete with flying carpets and dynastic intrigue"--… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Salman Rushdie's book Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.5)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 13
2.5 6
3 45
3.5 17
4 47
4.5 7
5 16

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 135,718,408 books! | Top bar: Always visible