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If You Were Me and Lived in... Hungary: A…
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If You Were Me and Lived in... Hungary: A Child's Introduction to Culture…

by Carole P. Roman

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I knew very little about the country of Hungary before reading this book. Parents can learn right along with their kids while reading this wonderful series of books by Carole P Roman.

As in all this other books in this series, we learn about Hungary's cities, landmarks, language, sports, and food. Did you know that Rubik's cube was invented there? I didn't. This landlocked country has a lot of offer and by sharing this book with your child, you are teaching them to appreciate other countries and their unique qualities.

I highly recommend this series for educators and parents and anyone who wants to learn more about this great world we live in. ( )
  Staciele | Apr 17, 2015 |
Next stop is – Hungary. Take your children or students on a trip around the world with Carole P. Roman’s If You Were Me and Lived In. series of interesting books that introduce children to cultures around the world.

The books begin with information about Hungary’s location, cities, and rivers. There is a pronunciation guide in the back of the book, but also next to each word that may be confusing for young readers. What I like about the books is that they describe things that children are most interested in and answer those questions that children would ask. What do you call your parents? Where do you go for fun? What kind of toys do you play with? What kind of foods do you eat? The book also describes holidays, local events, schools, and much more.

These books make learning about other people around the world a fun experience. This is a very informative and entertaining series of books. I highly recommend them for parents, grandparents, preschools and early educators.

I received a copy of this book in exchanged for an honest review. ( )
  Tmtrvlr | Mar 20, 2015 |
Once again we take a trip with this author to a new country. Today we explore Hungary and learn that the capital is Budapest. It is fun to learn some common names such as Peter, Laszlo or Atilla if you are a boy; and Judit, Suzanna or Erzse’bet if you are a girl. Mommy is Anya, Daddy is Apa and grandma is Nagy. The largest lake is the Balaton. It means mud or swamp. A popular food is goulash, which is a stew with meat and vegetables. It was interesting to learn that water polo is a favorite sport. I learned that the Rubik’s Cube was invented there. This is a wonderful way to learn about the country and culture of Hungary. ( )
  skstiles612 | Jan 16, 2015 |
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See what life would be like if you lived in Hungary.

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