HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Miss Dreamsville and the Lost Heiress of…
Loading...

Miss Dreamsville and the Lost Heiress of Collier County: A Novel

by Amy Hill Hearth

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
226476,730 (2.79)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
This is the sequel to Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women's Literary Society which I haven't read (yet), but you need not read the first book to enjoy this one.

The book starts off with Dora Witherspoon getting a telegram from Dolores Simpson that Dora's ex-husband Darryl Norwood is back in the town and is planning a big development along the tidal river. She wants Dora to stop him and Dora and the rest of Collier County Women's Literary Society; Jackie Hart, Mrs. Bailey White, and Plain Jane getter their forces to find a way to stop the development.

Charming! Thar is the word I would use to describe this book. I'm just so bloody fond of books/movies that takes place in the 60s in America (especially in a little town where everyone knows everyone). I mean there is lot going on, it's not a perfect little sweet story, Amy Hill Hearth never lets you forget that that there is still very much racism against the black that the civil right moments have not really had a big effect in the little towns in the south. Hell, there is a lot of racism against the Yankees as well. Jackie Hart and her family are from Boston, and they talk different and do things different there and it's not easy coming from Boston to Collier County (I seriously need to read the first book where Jackie arrives in Collier County).

But I'm still charmed by the book and the story. Yes, it was not a big surprising story with many twists, but I still enjoyed the book very much. The part where Dolores Simpson revealing her real name and everything that comes with that is probably my favorite part, and, Dora telling the book club about what she learned in Jackson about her mother was a sweet part and led to the wonderful revelation at the ending (that I guessed, but never mind that).

I was charmed by the characters and by the stories. And, if you also find these kinds of books charming, then I think you should read it.

I received this copy from Atria Books through Edelweiss in return for an honest review! Thank you! ( )
  MaraBlaise | Dec 10, 2017 |
Very disappointed after Miss Dreamsville #1. Had to read 100 or so pages to get into who the ppl were again; that should have been a wrap up in the first chapter. And then never got to a part where I didn't want to stop. Really really disappointed. ( )
  JeanetteSkwor | Mar 9, 2017 |
Fun, quick read ( )
  mchwest | Jun 7, 2016 |
Sissy: When I realized that one of the main characters was a stripper turned alligator hunter, I was hooked. I just had to know more about Dolores Simpson. Miss Dreamsville and the Lost Heiress of Collier County (there! I wrote out the whole long thing) is chock-full of similar fascinating personalities, like a good Southern seafood gumbo is chock-full of shrimp. Bubby: I’ve never eaten gumbo, seafood or otherwise, but I’ll agree with Sissy’s analogy. There’s just so much good stuff packed into this novel. For full review see www.bubblebath-books.com ( )
  bubblebathbooks | Sep 11, 2015 |
Miss Dreamsville and The Lost Heiress of Collier County is a sequel to Amy Hill Hearth's debut novel, Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women's Literary Society.

Picking up a year after the events of the first book, Dora Witherspoon is called back to Collier County by an urgent telegram from Delores Simpson who asks for Dora's help in stopping her ex husband from building a development over the 'glades. Dora isn't entirely sure how Delores expects her to do so but with the support of her friends, she is determined to at least try.

I enjoyed reuniting with the members of the Collier County Women's Literary Society, Jackie 'Miss Dreamsville' Hart, Plain Jane, murderess Mrs Bailey White, Robbie-Lee and his alligator hunter mother, Delores nee Bunny-Anne McIntyre, and Priscilla, along with her precious new baby, Dream. Dora has been absent for a year, searching for information about her late mother's family in Mississippi but she is welcomed back with open arms, and the group is all too happy to join Dora's cause to save Delores's home.

With it's charming southern accent and lighthearted wit, you might be fooled into thinking this novel is nothing more than light entertainment, but it includes an important message about environmental protection, and again touches on the intolerance, racism and sexism that typified the far south in the early sixties.

The plot is entertaining as Jackie stirs up trouble in the local newspaper, provoking the ghost of Seminole Joe and the ire of the town's investors. Dora is also struggling with the secrets she learned in Jackson about her family, unaware that she will find the surprising answers to her remaining questions in Collier County.

Funny, charming and yet thoughtful, Miss Dreamsville and The Lost Heiress of Collier County could be read as a stand alone but I would recommend that Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women's Literary Society be read first ( )
  shelleyraec | Sep 11, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 147676574X, Paperback)

In this sequel to Amy Hill Hearth’s “funny and charming” (Publishers Weekly) debut novel, Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women’s Literary Society, the eponymous book club reunites one year later, in the late summer of 1964.

Their mission: to fight a large development along the tidal river where member Robbie-Lee grew up and where his mother, Dolores Simpson, a former stripper turned alligator hunter, still lives in a fishing shack.

The developer is Darryl Norwood, ex-husband of narrator Dora Witherspoon, who returns to Collier County to assist in the battle. An old land deed, the discovery that one of the key characters has been using a false name, and a dramatic court hearing are just a few of the highlights. Not to mention the reappearance of the Ghost of Seminole Joe.

Just as Hearth’s debut explored the ways we can find a sense of belonging in other people, her latest novel shows how closely tied each of us is to our sense of home—and the conflicts that can arise when our idea of that home becomes threatened. For Darryl, the river is a place ripe for development. For Dora, who’s known as the Turtle Lady because she rescues Everglades “snappers,” it’s a place that belongs to the critters. And for Dolores, former stripper, it’s a place to hide from the world…

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:43 -0400)

Dolores Simpson, a former stripper turned alligator hunter, still lives in a fishing shack. The developer is Darryl Norwood, ex-husband of narrator Dora Witherspoon, who returns to Collier County to assist in the battle. An old land deed, the discovery that one of the key characters has been using a false name, and a court hearing in which Jackie steals the show are just a few of the highlights. New characters include a young lawyer from Atlanta who is afraid to visit the Everglades, and the Ghost of Seminole Joe. Hearth's latest novel shows how closely tied home is to a sense of place and the conflicts that can arise when that becomes threatened. For Darryl Harmon, the river is a place ripe for development. For narrator Dora Witherspoon (known as the Turtle Lady because she rescues Everglades "snappers") it's a place that belongs to the critters. And for Dolores Simpson, former stripper, it's a place to hide from the world.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
5 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2.79)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,723,243 books! | Top bar: Always visible