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Poison Is Not Polite (A Wells & Wong…
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Poison Is Not Polite (A Wells & Wong Mystery)

by Robin Stevens

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
A second delightful entry in the Wells and Wong series which is sure to appeal to young mystery fans--and probably quite a few adult ones, as well. A classic house party mystery, with a shady guest ending up poisoned at tea and all of the guests hiding secrets and coming under suspicion by our two intrepid heroines. In a vast improvement over the first book, Daisy is finally treating Hazel as more of a friend and equal. She still has moments of being spoiled and imperious, but this is a much nicer Daisy than the one we met in Murder is Bad Manners. ( )
  BillieBook | Apr 1, 2018 |
I enjoyed Poison is Not Polite even more than the first book, Murder is Bad Manners. Even though I liked the plot in the first book more, just being with these characters again and getting to know them even more made it more enjoyable. Also, there was more Beanie and I just can’t get enough of her. She is by far the best character.

These books are so much fun and I hate putting them down. I have been devouring them. I can’t wait to pick up the third book, First Class Murder. I’m so excited for another mystery with Hazel and Daisy. ( )
  TheTreeReader | Feb 15, 2018 |
This review and others posted over at my blog.

This was a charming sequel to Murder is Bad Manners (yes, I’m referring to middle-grade murder mysteries as charming) and as usual, I was totally stumped as to who the murder was.

Solving their second mystery, the girls find that their suspect list is comprised mostly of Daisy’s family, including her father, mother, brother and uncle and aunt, as well as their quiet new governess. The subject matter of this book is a bit heavier, as Daisy discovers her family has more issues than she thinks, on top of the murder. I guess it’s a kind of spoiler, so I won’t say what, but Daisy and Hazel witness a scene between two adults that causes Daisy to see one of her parents in a new light. In the midst of dealing with that trauma, her mother’s guest is murdered during Daisy’s birthday tea and virtually everyone in the house is a suspect.

The tone manages not to get too heavy, however. Daisy spends much of her time in denial about the true state of things and throws herself into the case with her usual flair. Hazel is observant and patient as always. The scenes where Daisy is confronted with reality are spaced out so the content isn’t too heavy or depressing. I did like that the plot aged a little with the girls, giving the series a chance to deal with topics that children are likely to come across as they grow into teens. Hmm, I feel like that didn’t come out very eloquently, but I don’t know how else to say it, so hopefully, you know what the hell I’m trying to say.

You don’t need to read Murder is Bad Manners in order to enjoy Poison is Not Polite, but I’m not sure why you’d skip over a book in a series on purpose. I’m excited about the next installment and as I mentioned before, I recommend this series if you’re looking for a middle-grade murder mystery (I really just like the way that phrase sounds) that has the potential to grow with its characters. ( )
  MillieHennessy | Jan 3, 2018 |
A tea party takes a poisonous turn leaving Daisy and Hazel with a new mystery to solve in the second novel of the Wells & Wong Mystery series.

Schoolgirl detectives Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are at Daisy’s home, Fallingford, for the holidays. Daisy’s glamorous mother is throwing a tea party for Daisy’s birthday, and the whole family is invited, from eccentric Aunt Saskia to dashing Uncle Felix. But it soon becomes clear that this party isn’t about Daisy after all—and she is furious. But Daisy’s anger falls to the wayside when one of their guests falls seriously and mysteriously ill—and everything points to poison. It’s up to Daisy and Hazel to find out what’s really going on.
  Clippers | Dec 21, 2017 |
This is a fun take on Agatha Christie style kind of crime novels for children, mixed with Enid Blyton's St. Clares and Malory Towers. All of the crime scenes are carefully described to remain child friendly, while at the same time leaving enough clues that the reader can race through alongside the two main characters trying to guess who exactly is responsible. The result does involve twists, and several points where something new is suddenly discovered, but none of this is done so out of the blue that it throws the reader.

-Arsenic For Tea- of the Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries, is known in the United States as -Poison Is Not Polite- of Wells and Wong Mystery, and is book 2 of both. This revolves around two characters, Daisy Wells who is the President of their Detective Agency and a high member of society, and Hazel Wong, a girl from Hong Kong who has been sent to an English Boarding School by her father, who acts as Vice-President and the note-taker of the two. The two main characters are fleshed out enough to make them believable, with backgrounds given to both that fits in with the time. The direct view into Daisy Wells' life as the two travel to Daisy Well's home is particularly fascinating, as this truly gives a glimpse into what it was like in the 1930's.

I found myself less jarred while reading this one, unlike the first where for some reason I kept forgetting what time period it was supposed to be set in and feeling it slightly more 'up in the air' because of this. The revolving characters, especially in the case of potential suspects for the death of Mr. Curtis had enough mystery to keep the reader jumping back and forth on who could be the murder, especially as new information was discovered. What I found that truly shined though was Daisy Wells, who faces a major upheaval and actually a turning point for her character. Hazel Wong didn't face such an arc, but this isn't because she is such a sympathetic and more submissive personality. She still stays true, and shows how great a friend she is by how she interacts with her best friend, Daisy Wells.

I would highly recommend this to any child 8 to 10. I don't think that this is one that will be of any interest to boys. It's a good book to hand to girls if they have finished the boarding school series of Enid Blyton, and like murder mysteries. It has great nods to the latter, Agatha Christie and to Sherlock Holmes, as Daisy Wells refers to Hazel Wong as 'her Watson'. Yet unlike the Sherlock series, Hazel Wong is just as important to discoveries as Daisy Wells. ( )
  CatKin026 | Aug 7, 2017 |
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To Boadie and the MBs, with thanks for years of kindness and friendship - and for giving Daisy her house.
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Something dreadful has happened to Mr. Curtis.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0552570737, Paperback)

The second brilliantly plotted mystery starring Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong.
     Schoolgirl detectives Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are at Daisy's home, Fallingford, for the holidays. Daisy's glamorous mother is throwing a tea party for Daisy's birthday, and the whole family is invited, from eccentric Aunt Saskia to dashing Uncle Felix. But it soon becomes clear that this party isn't really about Daisy at all. Naturally, Daisy is furious.
     Then one of their party falls seriously, mysteriously ill -- and everything points to poison.
     With wild storms preventing anyone from leaving, or the police from arriving, Fallingford suddenly feels like a very dangerous place to be. Not a single person present is what they seem -- and everyone has a secret or two. And when someone very close to Daisy looks suspicious, the Detective Society must do everything they can to reveal the truth... no matter the consequences.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:06:48 -0400)

Schoolgirl detectives Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are at Daisy's home, Fallingford, for the holidays. Daisy's glamorous mother is throwing a tea party for Daisy's birthday, and the whole family is invited, from eccentric Aunt Saskia to dashing Uncle Felix. But it soon becomes clear that this party isn't really about Daisy at all. Naturally, Daisy is furious. Then one of their party falls seriously, mysteriously ill - and everything points to poison. With wild storms preventing anyone from leaving, or the police from arriving, Fallingford suddenly feels like a very dangerous place to be.… (more)

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