HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Race for Paris: A Novel by Meg Waite…
Loading...

The Race for Paris: A Novel (2015)

by Meg Waite Clayton

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1118108,775 (3.83)3

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Must read for WW2 fans. Loved this. ( )
  pickleroad | Nov 10, 2016 |
4/5 stars
You can find all my reviews here.
*Disclaimer: I won this book from Goodreads First Reads, all my opinions are my own.*

J'ai plus de souvenirs que si j'avais mille ans.

This book is one of the hardest I've ever tried to place a rating on. The book was based around a time of war and while historical fiction, the history was definitely there. Books filled with history I generally have a harder time reading. I was never good at history, in fact, it was one of my worst subjects in high school and college. So I guess all the dates present and names that I feel like I should recognize but don't in history-related books make me feel dumb. I started off with that kind of mentality and it stuck for quite awhile. I would read for a bit and put it down because I felt overwhelmed by the dates and places (The only thing I'm worse in than history is geography. I don't know where anything is) and names. But as the story went on I began to emotionally connect with Jane. And through my emotional connection to her I could finally experience the story rather than feel bogged down in details. I could feel her desire to be wanted, her bitterness towards a friend. I understood Jane and that's what made this story special to me. It was a drastic change. I went from reading a chapter or two when i found a chance to making time to read 40 or more pages. I felt so connected to the book that I would just burst into tears. Not at anything overtly sad, but more at the whole concept, how bad the war must of been, how many people died, children left without parents, mothers without sons, fathers and brothers in trenches praying they make it home to see their loved ones smile one last time. I guess until I read this war was just something that happened. I had never really been affected much by war, but something in the writing and in that bond I formed with the main character made me realize how terrible war can be for once, made me realize this is something that actually happens, actually ruins lives.

So in the end, no I didn't give it a 5 star review. But that doesn't mean you wouldn't. If you are someone who loves history, someone who enjoys historical fiction it would suit you better than me. It was wonderfully written but I rate books on an personal enjoyment basis, and there were times where me and the book didn't click at all. If you have the money, you enjoy WWII literature, and you don't mind getting teary-eyed pick up this book because Meg Waite Clayton spent years making this book as close to perfect as she could get it. ( )
  MarandaNicole | Jan 27, 2016 |
4/5 stars
You can find all my reviews here.
*Disclaimer: I won this book from Goodreads First Reads, all my opinions are my own.*

J'ai plus de souvenirs que si j'avais mille ans.

This book is one of the hardest I've ever tried to place a rating on. The book was based around a time of war and while historical fiction, the history was definitely there. Books filled with history I generally have a harder time reading. I was never good at history, in fact, it was one of my worst subjects in high school and college. So I guess all the dates present and names that I feel like I should recognize but don't in history-related books make me feel dumb. I started off with that kind of mentality and it stuck for quite awhile. I would read for a bit and put it down because I felt overwhelmed by the dates and places (The only thing I'm worse in than history is geography. I don't know where anything is) and names. But as the story went on I began to emotionally connect with Jane. And through my emotional connection to her I could finally experience the story rather than feel bogged down in details. I could feel her desire to be wanted, her bitterness towards a friend. I understood Jane and that's what made this story special to me. It was a drastic change. I went from reading a chapter or two when i found a chance to making time to read 40 or more pages. I felt so connected to the book that I would just burst into tears. Not at anything overtly sad, but more at the whole concept, how bad the war must of been, how many people died, children left without parents, mothers without sons, fathers and brothers in trenches praying they make it home to see their loved ones smile one last time. I guess until I read this war was just something that happened. I had never really been affected much by war, but something in the writing and in that bond I formed with the main character made me realize how terrible war can be for once, made me realize this is something that actually happens, actually ruins lives.

So in the end, no I didn't give it a 5 star review. But that doesn't mean you wouldn't. If you are someone who loves history, someone who enjoys historical fiction it would suit you better than me. It was wonderfully written but I rate books on an personal enjoyment basis, and there were times where me and the book didn't click at all. If you have the money, you enjoy WWII literature, and you don't mind getting teary-eyed pick up this book because Meg Waite Clayton spent years making this book as close to perfect as she could get it. ( )
  MarandaNicole | Jan 27, 2016 |
The Race For Paris by Meg Waite Clayton borrowed generously from the experiences and memoirs of women journalists and photographers like Martha Gellhorn, Helen Kirkpatrick, and Margaret Bourke-White
who disregarded the rules in order to cover World War II from the front. There was a rule that only men journalists could report from the front lines, the women were shunted to hospitals, refugee centers and military headquarters, all well to the rear. This story is about two American female correspondents who go AWOL as they try to document the Allied liberation of Paris. To actually be there when the troops marched in was to record history and would make their careers.

Overall, I thought the author did a fine job of blending history and fiction. She certainly gets across the difficulties that women correspondents faced. The Race for Paris is a great blend of drama, adventure and passion as these two foolhardy women along with a British military photographer race through the French countryside toward Paris.

I enjoyed The Race For Paris on many levels, but probably most for the history. I thought the characters were a little under-developed for me to fully invest in their storyline, but I would certainly recommend this book to any lovers of WW II history as this is a subject that I haven’t seen addressed before. ( )
  DeltaQueen50 | Dec 23, 2015 |
This was a "two tear" book meaning I shed tears twice while reading it. Excellent story of WWII journalists, in today's world one does not need to predicate with female but during WWII women had to climb mountains to be allowed the opportunity to cover the war.
Loved the book and I am inspired to read more about Boufke-White and Gellhorn and their stories.
Fascinating and touching story of the war, friendships, and ambition. I would recommend this book to everyone who enjoys gritty historic fiction. ( )
  Alphawoman | Oct 7, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
I would give anything to be part of the invasion and see Paris right at the beginning and watch the peace.
—Journalist Martha Gellhorn in a December 13, 1943 letter
And yet love turns out to be the only part of us that is solid, as the world turns upside down and the screen goes black.
—Martin Amis, from The Second Plane
Dedication
For Mac,
pour toujours,
and for Marly and Claire
First words
The moon over the Hotel de Ville hangs as round and golden as a C ration can to complete this fairy-tale setting: the clock in the tower striking the half hour; the stone flag bearers rising above slate roofs like egrets poised for flight; and the windows, of course, all those windows leaving guests trying to remember which one, exactly, de Gaulle addressed us from—those of us old enough to remember, anyway.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

LibraryThing Author

Meg Waite Clayton is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
44 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.83)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 8
3.5 3
4 9
4.5 2
5 4

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 116,918,659 books! | Top bar: Always visible