HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Debi Chaudhurani, or The Wife Who Came Home…
Loading...

Debi Chaudhurani, or The Wife Who Came Home

by Bankim Chandra Chatterjee

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
3None2,001,085NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Bankim Chandra Chatterjeeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lipner, JuliusTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0195388364, Paperback)

This is the second in a trilogy of works by the famed Bengali novelist Bankimcandra Chatterji (1838-1894), and the second to be translated by Julius Lipner. The first, Anandamath, or The Sacred Brotherhood was published by OUP in 2005. Bankim Chatterji was perhaps the foremost novelist and intellectual mediating western ideas to India in the latter half of the 19th century. Debi Chaudhurani is a didactic work that champions a particular interpretation of Hindu dharma and wifely duties reflective of the late 19th-century Calcutta context in which it was written. But the story is also compelling. Written in a conversational style, it features surprising plot twists and ideas that are, even today, revolutionary in their daring. Most notably, Bankim makes a woman the embodiment of Lord Krishna's salvific message, as originally enunciated in the Bhagavad Gita. The protagonist, Debi, is a complex figure who is a rejected wife, becomes a bandit queen, represents a goddess figure, and symbolizes the land of India. There is a creative tension between her strength as a leader and her correct role, from the perspective of the author, as a domestic wife. Bankim also focuses on caste and what it means to be a genuine Brahmin, who is transformed by the author into a man who executes responsibilities instead of demanding privileges. Within the context of the teachings of the Gita, the author shares his vision of social activism to improve India. Lipner's idiomatic translation is enhanced by his detailed commentary on the original Bengali text and by a readable introduction that sets the novel and its ideas in context.

(retrieved from Amazon Tue, 14 Apr 2015 01:16:40 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 127,137,333 books! | Top bar: Always visible