HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

After Freedom: The Rise of the…
Loading...

After Freedom: The Rise of the Post-Apartheid Generation in Democratic…

by Katherine S. Newman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
157647,891 (3.88)2

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I was very interested in the topic of this book and studied South Africa a lot in school; however, I felt that it was a bit academic. I would a preferred a lighter read. That said, the information was excellent and the history that was given created great context. ( )
  UnionGospelMission | Apr 6, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This work, admirable as the project might be, really suffers from being overly academic. The prose is weighted down by overly formal language and extended digressions into history, explanation/rationales, and analysis. What might have been powerful stories are instead shaped (tortured?) into black & white pictures of individuals who are made to be flat and fairly one-sided when depicted in the narrow confines of the academic and authorial interest presented here. Truthfully, I found this last issue somewhat infuriating because I felt that the book's project did have so much merit, but that the starkly academic approach took all of the color and life from the projects, reducing to flat case studies what should have been powerful introductions to real people.

The best moments for the book are in its analysis of history and in the first-person anecdotes where a reader is actually able to hear the voices of the people the author examined. Unfortunately, these first person moments with the people at the center of the book are few enough to be little more than glimmers of understanding in what is, otherwise, presented in such a flat manner as to be incredibly unengaging.

I really wanted to engage with and fall into this book; based on the subject matter and my own interests, that shouldn't have been a problem. Yet, more often than not, I was bored and anxious to simply be done with the read, and wishing that someone with a less heavy-handed academic style had taken on the writing. ( )
  whitewavedarling | Aug 14, 2016 |
After Freedom reads more like a movie documentary than a narrative book. This perspective allows for a look into the lives of people the first post-apartheid generation. The book moves between South Africans of different political persuasions, class, and backgrounds to provide a narrative that is complicated and informative. The authors do not try to unify or gloss over differences and contradictions but rather allows them to exist and be seen. This provides a narrative that leaves the reader struggling to understand modern South Africa. This struggle is not a weakness however, but allows the reader to see the complexities that exist in contemporary South Africa. ( )
  morningrob | Jul 29, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This is a book of sociological research; so the writing style doesn’t really lend itself to casual reading. At first I found it slow, but as I got further into the book, it got more and more interesting. The researchers in this book followed a group of South Africans to see how different groups had fared after apartheid. It was interesting to see the long-lasting effects of the rigid segregation of Apartheid. Interestingly, education or the lack of it seemed to predict who would and who would not be successful after Apartheid.

I have a long-standing interest in South Africa, so the book was interesting to me. Also it was interesting because there are a lot of parallels to the United States. The authors point these parallels out, but don’t develop this theme, as it would be beyond the scope of their research. I am not sure that this is a book for the general reader; but it would be good for a college classroom, or if one has an interest in South Africa. ( )
  banjo123 | Jun 11, 2015 |
This is a book of sociological research; so the writing style doesn’t really lend itself to casual reading. At first I found it slow, but as I got further into the book, it got more and more interesting. The researchers in this book followed a group of South Africans to see how different groups had fared after apartheid. It was interesting to see the long-lasting effects of the rigid segregation of Apartheid. Interestingly, education or the lack of it seemed to predict who would and who would not be successful after Apartheid.

I have a long-standing interest in South Africa, so the book was interesting to me. Also it was interesting because there are a lot of parallels to the United States. The authors point these parallels out, but don’t develop this theme, as it would be beyond the scope of their research. I am not sure that this is a book for the general reader; but it would be good for a college classroom, or if one has an interest in South Africa. ( )
  banjo123 | Apr 30, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0807047503, Paperback)

Twenty years after the end of apartheid, a new generation is building a multiracial democracy in South Africa but remains mired in economic inequality and political conflict.
 
The death of Nelson Mandela in 2013 arrived just short of the twentieth anniversary of South Africa’s first free election, reminding the world of the promise he represented as the nation’s first Black president.  Despite significant progress since the early days of this new democracy, frustration is growing as inequalities that once divided the races now grow within them as well.
 
In After Freedom, award-winning sociologist Katherine S. Newman and South African expert Ariane De Lannoy bring alive the voices of the “freedom generation,” who came of age after the end of apartheid. Through the stories of seven ordinary individuals who will inherit the richest, and yet most unequal, country in Africa, Newman and De Lannoy explore how young South Africans, whether Black, White, mixed race, or immigrant, confront the lingering consequences of racial oppression. These intimate portraits illuminate the erosion of old loyalties, the eruption of class divides, and the heated debate over policies designed to redress the evils of apartheid. Even so, the freedom generation remains committed to a united South Africa and is struggling to find its way toward that vision. 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:23 -0400)

Twenty years after the end of apartheid, a new generation is building a multiracial democracy in South Africa but remains mired in economic inequality and political conflict. This spring, South Africa will celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the fall of apartheid and the first free elections. Although the country has come far, frustration is growing as inequalities that once divided the races now grow within them. In After Freedom, award-winning sociologist Katherine S. Newman and South African expert Ariane De Lannoy profile seven people: Black, White, Coloured, and immigrant to reveal what life is like in South Africa today.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Katherine S. Newman's book After Freedom was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.88)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5
4 2
4.5 1
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,415,781 books! | Top bar: Always visible