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Skyfaring by Mark Vanhoenacker
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Skyfaring (edition 2016)

by Mark Vanhoenacker

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190687,892 (3.73)10
Member:hfglen
Title:Skyfaring
Authors:Mark Vanhoenacker
Info:London: Vintage
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:transport, flying, worldwide

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Skyfaring: A Journey with a Pilot by Mark Vanhoenacker

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
If you fly and are the person who wants the window seat, you’ll relate to this book. It’s not a conventional pilot’s book. Instead the author takes you on a journey with him. You learn about different planes, coming from Seattle hearing compliments about the 747 is music t my ears, but what was most interesting was information about how pilots fly without GPS, what are things pilots like in the cockpit. What will stay with me though on a personal level is the term “place-lag”, traveling from airport to airport isn’t much different that “Jet-lag” confusion about where you are. One of the best books I’ve read. I thought it sounded interesting, but I didn’t expect to be reading it aloud to my husband because each chapter was filled with interesting tidbits and details. ( )
  brangwinn | Feb 13, 2018 |
The author is a pilot and clearly 'in love' with flying, which I can well understand as I still experience a thrill every time I take off, even after several thousand flights as a passenger. However his sometimes lyrical prose may not endear itself to all readers. Certain insights did give me pause for reflection, as in the way pilots (at least in a large airline) usually work with crew members whom they have never met before, as is also the case with the cabin crew team. This absence of a group of stable work companions and the friendships that this engenders, is pretty unusual. Still, the author flies the Boeing 747 which is still my favourite aircraft type, 40 years and counting after it took to the skies. ( )
  DramMan | Feb 13, 2017 |
A beautifully written book. It is divided into sections - night, return etc that reflect seperate elements of flight and what these mean to the pilot of large commercial jets. The author clearly loves his job, not just the physical side of flying, but the spiritual element of connecting with the sky and the land over which he flies. Quite a slow, deep sort f book, but worth losing yourself in. It certainly makes you look at flying in a different light ( )
  PIER50 | Sep 11, 2016 |
The book, perhaps unsurprisingly, reads like a long flight. There are moments of excitement as the author reveals as aspect of flying new to the reader, generating more like a warm smile than a moment of enthusiastic new discovery or wonder

Ultimately the book offers a lot of depth and rewards the reader with a feeling of amazement a traveller gets when realizing they are in a new and different place. The journey to get there can at times feel onerous, but a little stretch and walk round enables the reader to settle back into their seat and enjoy the journey.

Put another way, it's a enjoyable read full of great information which at times is a bit slow but ultimately worth the trouble! ( )
  rightantler | May 21, 2016 |
Book about flying by a pilot. Often engaging to hear people talk about their passion-there should have been a little more of that here. One learns many interesting things-like inertial system and the gyroscope to measure rotation (not mechanical, a laser gyro, where a light is put into a closed path in two directions, and if the two beams do not meet at the exact opposite point, it is because aircraft has rotated), inertial system, head and tail wind at takeoff (headwind beneficial, because it gets the plane quicker to the airspeed it needs to be airborne).
Short version of the book here: http://www.vox.com/2016/5/2/11520288/pilot-airplane-photos
Ok. ( )
  ohernaes | May 5, 2016 |
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For Lois and Mark, and in memory of my parents
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 038535181X, Hardcover)

A poetic and nuanced exploration of the human experience of flight that reminds us of the full imaginative weight of our most ordinary journeys and renews our capacity to be amazed.

The twenty-first century has relegated airplane flight--a once remarkable feat of human ingenuity--to the realm of the mundane. Mark Vanhoenacker, a 747 pilot who left academia and a career in the business world to pursue his childhood dream of flight, asks us to reimagine what we--both as pilots and as passengers--are actually doing when we enter the world between departure and discovery. In a seamless fusion of history, politics, geography, meteorology, ecology, family, and physics, the author vaults across geographical and cultural boundaries, above mountains, oceans, and deserts, through snow, wind, and rain, limning a simultaneously humbling and almost superhuman activity that affords us unparalleled perspectives on the planet we inhabit and the communities we form.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:52 -0400)

"The twenty-first century has relegated airplane flight--a once remarkable feat of human ingenuity--to the realm of the mundane. When most people today think of flying, they imagine tedious routines that involve security checkpoints, exorbitant baggage fees, shrinking legroom, and frustrating delays. Mark Vanhoenacker, a 747 pilot who gave up careers in academia and the business world to pursue his childhood dream of flight, asks us to re-imagine what we--both as pilots and as passengers--are actually doing when we enter the world between departure and discovery. In a seamless fusion of history, politics, geography, meteorology, ecology, family, and physics, the author vaults across geographical and cultural boundaries, above mountains, oceans, and deserts, through snow, wind, and rain, limning a simultaneously humbling and almost superhuman activity which can afford us unparalleled perspectives on the planet we inhabit and the communities we form"--… (more)

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