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Voices in the Ocean: A Journey into the Wild…
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Voices in the Ocean: A Journey into the Wild and Haunting World of… (2015)

by Susan Casey

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“How do you think humans got so cruel?” I asked Makili. He gazed at the ocean, then back at Turner and me. “We forgot,” he said, letting the words linger. “We forgot our responsibility. And we forgot that we are as equal as any living thing within the chain. There’s no hierarchy in this. Nah. We are part of the same family: living things. All the rest of it is just totally fucking bullshit.”

Dolphins have to be the coolest creatures, on earth and that includes human beings. Dolphins are not vicious, dishonest, vindictive or blood-thirsty. They are smart, family orientated and generally kind. We kill them and exploit them. This is what we do.
I really enjoyed Casey's book, The Wave, about monster waves and the surfer community. In this one, she sets her sights on dolphins and other sea mammals, like killer whales, which are also kick-ass. She traveled thousands of miles, to research, protest and swim with these blissful creatures. She also connected with many fine people, along the way, who have made it their life mission, to protect these wonderful animals.
Fair warning- This book is not for the faint of heart. Cruelty abounds here and Casey hammers it home, like a pile-driver. She does not mince words, but if you can stomach it, it is a very well-written, heartfelt look at nature's best.

**Also, the audiobook is excellent. Just sayin'... ( )
  msf59 | Jul 17, 2019 |
Susan Casey is one of my favourite authors. Her approach and passion for her subject and personal take on things always carries through to the reader. ( )
  kenno82 | Feb 27, 2018 |
Entertaining and informative like Casey's other books, this one seeming just a little more superfluous.

Like the research and reporting on John Lilly, one of the original dolphin researchers. Great info on the slaughters that take place around the world most of all the Solomon Islands ( )
  rdwhitenack | Jun 3, 2017 |
Great writer. She weaves a compelling story. Have enjoyed all her books. Like the gamut of info from Dolphin habitats and life cycle, to the societies in history who have revered and been at peace with the dolphins. Very sad what we humans are doing to such beautiful, intelligent creatures. ( )
  bermandog | Apr 22, 2017 |
A very satisfying work by a woman who writes well and with verve. Here are the essentials of how and when research into dolphin cognition and language began and where that research has led. Readers learn of the great variety of dolphins and whales and also about the cultures of each animal. All are highly social, all have huge brains, all have natural echo-location which is far more advanced than anything humans have yet created, all are extraordinarily intelligenet and capable. The author trashes the dolphin theme parks, noting that, in effect, these imprisoned individuals live shorter lives, don't have a chance to work up to a fraction of their potential, frequently are sick, and generally that these parks exist solely for profits rather than the welfare or study of the animals. For orcas, it is even worse; their culture is incredibly tight, matriarchal, and multi-generational; to put a single orca in a tank is to punish the animal with solitary confinement. I think the book's flaw is that the author presents a series of snapshots rather than a coherent narrative that constitutes an educational immersion. The snapshots are interesting, some moreso than others, but it makes for an incomplete presentation. Two chapters on hunting dolphins are especially gruesome and hard to get through. ( )
  neddludd | Jan 24, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0385537301, Hardcover)

From Susan Casey, the New York Times bestselling author of The Wave and The Devil’s Teeth, a breathtaking journey through the extraordinary world of dolphins
 
Since the dawn of recorded history, humans have felt a kinship with the sleek and beautiful dolphin, an animal whose playfulness, sociability, and intelligence seem like an aquatic mirror of mankind. In recent decades, we have learned that dolphins recognize themselves in reflections, count, grieve, adorn themselves, feel despondent, rescue one another (and humans), deduce, infer, seduce, form cliques, throw tantrums, and call themselves by name. Scientists still don’t completely understand their incredibly sophisticated navigation and communication abilities, or their immensely complicated brains.
     While swimming off the coast of Maui, Susan Casey was surrounded by a pod of spinner dolphins. It was a profoundly transporting experience, and it inspired her to embark on a two-year global adventure to explore the nature of these remarkable beings and their complex relationship to humanity. Casey examines the career of the controversial John Lilly, the pioneer of modern dolphin studies whose work eventually led him down some very strange paths. She visits a community in Hawaii whose adherents believe dolphins are the key to spiritual enlightenment, travels to Ireland, where a dolphin named as “the world’s most loyal animal” has delighted tourists and locals for decades with his friendly antics, and consults with the world’s leading marine researchers, whose sense of wonder inspired by the dolphins they study increases the more they discover.
     Yet there is a dark side to our relationship with dolphins. They are the stars of a global multibillion-dollar captivity industry, whose money has fueled a sinister and lucrative trade in which dolphins are captured violently, then shipped and kept in brutal conditions. Casey’s investigation into this cruel underground takes her to the harrowing epicenter of the trade in the Solomon Islands, and to the Japanese town of Taiji, made famous by the Oscar-winning documentary The Cove, where she chronicles the annual slaughter and sale of dolphins in its narrow bay.
     Casey ends her narrative on the island of Crete, where millennia-old frescoes and artwork document the great Minoan civilization, a culture which lived in harmony with dolphins, and whose example shows the way to a more enlightened coexistence with the natural world.
     No writer is better positioned to portray these magical creatures than Susan Casey, whose combination of personal reporting, intense scientific research, and evocative prose made The Wave and The Devil’s Teeth contemporary classics of writing about the sea. In Voices in the Ocean, she has written a thrilling book about the other intelligent life on the planet.

(retrieved from Amazon Wed, 29 Jul 2015 18:47:56 -0400)

"While swimming off the coast of Maui, Susan Casey was surrounded by a pod of spinner dolphins. It was a profoundly transporting experience, and it inspired her to embark on a two-year global adventure to explore the nature of these remarkable beings and their complex relationship to humanity. Casey examines the career of the controversial John Lilly, the pioneer of modern dolphin studies whose work eventually led him down some very strange paths. She visits a community in Hawaii whose adherents believe dolphins are the key to spiritual enlightenment, travels to Ireland, where a dolphin named as "the world's most loyal animal" has delighted tourists and locals for decades with his friendly antics, and consults with the world's leading marine researchers, whose sense of wonder inspired by the dolphins they study increases the more they discover. Yet there is a dark side to our relationship with dolphins. They are the stars of a global multibillion-dollar captivity industry, whose money has fueled a sinister and lucrative trade in which dolphins are captured violently, then shipped and kept in brutal conditions. Casey's investigation into this cruel underground takes her to the harrowing epicenter of the trade in the Solomon Islands, and to the Japanese town of Taiji, made famous by the Oscar-winning documentary The Cove, where she chronicles the annual slaughter and sale of dolphins in its narrow bay. Casey ends her narrative on the island of Crete, where millennia-old frescoes and artwork document the great Minoan civilization, a culture which lived in harmony with dolphins, and whose example shows the way to a more enlightened coexistence with the natural world" --… (more)

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