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M Train by Smith Patti
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M Train (original 2015; edition 2012)

by Smith Patti (Author)

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7833017,122 (4.11)44
Member:timoheuer
Title:M Train
Authors:Smith Patti (Author)
Info:Bloomsbury (2012)
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:lang:en, autobiografie, kunst, künstlerleben, künstler

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M Train by Patti Smith (2015)

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English (29)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (30)
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
A deliciously narrated audiobook memoir, a fluid account of Smith's ongoings from the omnipresent black coffee to her persistent bond to Fred Sonic Smith to her devotion to influential writers, Genet, Rimbaud, Bowles, Sebald, & others, this title took me by pleasant surprise. I was arrested by Smith's quixotic faith in fate, Polaroid film, Rockaway Beach, & setting things right by myriad authors, both living and dead. For instance, she takes (after a 20-year interval) the stones of a prison in French Guiana to the grave of Jean Genet in Algiers, so he can be close to a place he longed to be.
Smith inspired me to take photos and mark and record my days more thoughtfully. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
A deliciously narrated audiobook memoir, a fluid account of Smith's ongoings from the omnipresent black coffee to her persistent bond to Fred Sonic Smith to her devotion to influential writers, Genet, Rimbaud, Bowles, Sebald, & others, this title took me by pleasant surprise. I was arrested by Smith's quixotic faith in fate, Polaroid film, Rockaway Beach, & setting things right by myriad authors, both living and dead. For instance, she takes (after a 20-year interval) the stones of a prison in French Guiana to the grave of Jean Genet in Algiers, so he can be close to a place he longed to be.
Smith inspired me to take photos and mark and record my days more thoughtfully. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
First of all, I love Patti Smith and admire all that she does in life. Just Kids is one of my favourite books of all time, but none of that makes up for my feelings toward M Train. While Patti is a brilliant writer, this book just doesn't do it for me. I tried to get into it numerous times, but it's just not me. I found it boring and lagging - and that's coming from someone who loves black coffee and discussing dreams.
  polyreaderamy | Jun 11, 2018 |
Thirty-five years ago, I had the good fortune to meet Patti Smith by chance at CBGBs, the legendary punk rock venue in New York. My then girlfriend (now wife) and I were visiting America for the first time, about to embark on a year’s postgraduate study in California, and had managed to obtain tickets for a gig (any gig!) at the iconic venue. At this remove of time I can’t even recall who was playing, although I do remember that the concert was pretty ropy. None of that mattered, of course, as we were simply starstruck by the surroundings and enjoying what amounted to a pilgrimage. We ventured to the bar and found ourselves standing next to Patti Smith and, emboldened by the adrenalin surge prompted by the occasion, plucked up the courage to talk to her. We had a pleasant conversation, and she seemed intrigued by the books poking from our respective pockets. So much so, in fact, that she asked us to meet her the following day at one of her favourite cafés. As our time in New York was very short, every moment had been strictly accounted for in advance, but our schedules went straight out of the window and we agreed in a nanosecond.

Cafés, or at least regular doses of strong coffee, clearly play a huge part in Patti Smith’s life, and form the unifying theme of this volume of memoirs. Indeed, T. S. Eliot’s line, ‘I have measured out my life with coffee spoons’ might have proved a worthy epigraph. She describes her travels around the world, both with her late husband, Fred ‘Sonic’ Smith (who died in 1994), and later on her own, and wherever she goes, she finds a café to use as a refuge. Her displeasure when someone else ‘steals’ her customary seat at one of her regular haunts is something that many of us can recognise and empathise with.

Her prose style is frequently beautiful and moving – somehow rather at odds with the ferocity of her early stage persona. I remember being both exhilarated but also almost frightened while watching her performances from the 1970s, when she would shout and rage at the audience. While the strength of character and self-assurance (I know, I know, a dirty word!) that underpinned those performances clearly remains, age appears to have mellowed her, and there is a contemplative tranquillity about many of these pieces. ( )
1 vote Eyejaybee | Feb 14, 2018 |
It’s not so easy writing about nothing
~ Patti Smith

There’s a cowpoke haunting both her sleep and daydreams. Antagonizing her creative flow, egging her on. He meanders throughout the book, just inside wakefulness.
With husband Fred Smith, she tours the places written of by her literary heroes, bringing them tokens, photos, words and making her own collection of same. Rustic roads, dilapidated structures, foreign languages, unorthodox modes of travel, mostly foot, and danger, they sought on. After his death, she continued and does still. Her quirky desire to find locations mentioned in books, fictitious or not. To visit them, meditate there, photograph and write of them. A writer’s chair, an abandoned well, cafe.
These are the snippets, journal entries brought forth with black coffee, brown bread & olive oil in Cafe ‘Ino and the numerous cafes of her travels. Dreams and travels. Observations and ruminations.
Holed up in hotels as she is called upon to do readings, talks, she caters to her fixation with detective shows, pantomiming along with them. “When they had a chop, I ordered same from room service. If they had a drink, I consulted the mini bar.”
Memories of times with Fred are entwined. (Would have enjoyed the tv show she & Fred conceived “Drunk in the Afternoon” had it ever came to be. He gabfesting with fellow drinkers, she expounding on literary prisoners while drinking coffee.)
Her search for the purported perfect cup of coffee trained her to Mexico, sidelined with a visit to Frida Kahlo’s Casa Azul. A nod to William Burroughs, who tipped her the brew, reminded me of d.a. levy’s own search for such the elixir. I, too, have searched. Paying 20+ a pound, gifted more, to enjoy the perfect balance. Remembering the Jamaican Blue Mountain I drank every morning in Ocho Rios and never since, no matter how badly claimed the beans were. Alas. That was my epitome, my Holy Grail of coffee.
A brilliant, often woeful look into the daily life of one of my heroes. I feel like, were I to happen upon her somewhere, we could share a hot, black cup of coffee and need not say a word.

“I didn’t seek to frame these moments. They passed without souvenir,” ... “What I have lost and cannot find I remember."
~ Patti Smith ( )
  CherylGrimm | Jan 20, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
M Train might be taken as a most roundabout and leisurely way of answering the question “How have you been?” The answer comes in the form of fragments of waking fantasy, literary commentaries, extended reminiscences, evocations of lost objects, travel notations, tallies of places and names and flavors (“Lists. Small anchors in the swirl of transmitted waves, reverie, and saxophone solos”). By turns it is daybook, dreambook, commonplace book. Under all lies a grief that is never allowed to overwhelm the writing but is, it would seem, its groundwater. She allows herself to begin anywhere and break off anywhere, thus realizing the secret yearning of almost anyone who sits down to write a book: that it might be possible for the thing simply to create itself out of necessity, to emerge as if by a natural process of unfolding.
 

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Patti Smithprimary authorall editionscalculated
Heuvelmans, TonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Wij willen dingen die we niet kunnen hebben. We willen een bepaald moment, geluid, gevoel terughalen. Ik wil de stem van mijn moeder horen. Ik wil mijn kinderen zien als kinderen. Kleine handjes, snelle voetjes. Alles verandert. Jongen volwassen, vader dood, dochter langer dan ik, huilend in een nare droom. Blijf alsjeblieft altijd hier, zeg ik tegen de dingen die ik ken. Ga niet weg. Groei niet op.
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The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee presents reflections on her inner life from the unique perspectives of the cafes and cultural haunts she has visited and worked in around the world. --Publisher's description.

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