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The Magician's Nephew by C. S. Lewis
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Member:The_Hibernator
Title:The Magician's Nephew
Authors:C. S. Lewis
Info:HarperCollins (2000), Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Classics, C. S. Lewis, Young Adult, Fantasy, Christian, Spirituality, Narnia, Magician, Pegasus

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The Magician's Nephew by C. S. Lewis (1955)

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English (226)  German (2)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (2)  Polish (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Danish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (236)
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The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels for children written by C. S. Lewis. It is considered a classic of children's literature and is the author's best-known work, having sold over 120 million copies in 41 languages. Written by Lewis between 1949 and 1954 and illustrated by Pauline Baynes.

The books contain Christian ideas made easily accessible to young readers. They are not pedantic, however, and their richness of adventure, color, and ideas have made them favorites of children and adults, Christians and non-Christians. In addition to Christian themes, Lewis also borrows characters from Greek and Roman mythology as well as traditional British and Irish fairy tales.

Even though the Magician's nephew is the "Sixth" installment it should be read First.

Completed in the winter of 1954 and published in 1955, the prequel The Magician's Nephew brings the reader back to the very beginning of Narnia where we learn how Aslan created the world and how evil first entered it. Digory Kirke and his friend Polly Plummer stumble into different worlds by experimenting with magic rings made by Digory's uncle (the titular "magician"), encounter Jadis (The White Witch), and witness the creation of Narnia. Many long-standing questions about Narnia are answered in the adventure that follows.
Though written in simple style to be appreciated by young scholars, this book seems to echo with subtle and not so subtle references to the bible. A background check on the late great C. S. Lewis will reveal that he became a theist in 1929, a Christian in 1931, and later was awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity by the University of St. Andrews in 1946.

His belief in the existence of one God, viewed as the creative source of man and the world, who transcends yet is immanent in the world, provides the foundation for the series, especially in this book and the magnificent classic "The Lion The Witch and The Wardrobe."
It is well known that the Chronicles of Narnia parallels the Bible, and in this book, it talks about the creation of Narnia, the entry of evil to Narnia, the temptation of man, and it also helps us understand the origins of the wardrobe in The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe. Though this book was not written first, but it brings context to the next book when read this first.

There are many interesting views that Lewis brings across in this book, like the Wood between the Worlds. It seem to give the perspective from God's point of view in relation to time and space, where the Wood becomes the view to different worlds, being able to travel from one to another. Lewis' analogy as a corridor that linked to different apartments in a block of houses was brilliant. This book also showed the creation of Narnia when they travelled into nothingness, and hearing the singing of the Lion, the world came into being. This parallels the creation as God spoke it into existence. This book also showed that Aslan is not just limited to Narnia, but transcend beyond that, and it was interesting when Aslan said to the Cabby, "Son, I have known you long, Do you know me?" This implied the existence of Aslan in the world that the Cabby came from.

This book is so full of ideas, thoughts and parallels that Lewis had weaved in it with masterful artistry. Read and be thrilled! ( )
  AlexisLovesBooks | Jul 21, 2016 |
I loved the Chronicles of Narnia as a child and was excited to read this with my 8 year old son. As a child, I love the magic and beauty contained in these other worlds. As an adult, I now see the parallels to the bible, and the messages it is intending to teach. The ending of the book is actually a retelling of sorts of the story of creation from the bible. I must say my remembrance of the book was that of a 5 star read, but in re-reading it, I can only give 4 stars. My son, although very interested and attuned to the storyline throughout, I think would agree.

I will keep this review short as there is so much already written about this novel and instead of providing discussion questions, I will simply provide links. ( )
  marieatbookchatter | Jul 12, 2016 |
A slightly disturbing tale, but a great book over all. Really helps tell how the Narnia world started. ( )
  Shadow494 | Jun 20, 2016 |
In this sixth (yes, I'm a stickler for publication order) book in the Chronicles of Narnia, a young boy named Digory meets a girl named Polly and when the two go adventuring in their row house they accidentally stumble upon Digory's uncle, a magician who tricks them into testing his creation of special rings to take them to another world.

I have read and reread the Chronicles of Narnia since I was a young child and they've become entrenched in my earliest reading memories to the point where I can no longer be entirely objective when reading them. I enjoy the reading experience and listening to the HarperCollins audio productions - this one is read by Kenneth Branagh. When I was a child, this is the book in the series that gave me the most trouble. It takes forever to actually get to Narnia, yet as a creation story it's really cool to see elements you recognize from the earlier stories (part of the reason I still treat it as the "sixth" book) and understand the origins. In fact, I don't think it has quite the same meaning if you don't already know, for example, that Jadis becomes the White WitchEven so, whether you read it first or sixth or somewhere in the middle, it's a solid adventure fantasy if you have the patience for it to get going, with humorous parts and serious moral questions. ( )
  bell7 | Jun 15, 2016 |
When you and you'r family are on a long road trip and need a book series that everyone is willing to listen to (and you've already done a Harry Potter book series) you end up with the Narnia Chronicles. The last time I listened to these books was when my mother read them to me just before bedtime when I was six or seven. So granted, there is a lot of things I don't remember about this series. I can't say that I completely enjoyed this one as much as I had hoped. The christian influence was very heavy for me. I tried to convince myself that I should just look at it as a fantasy story - that's what it is after all. But religion has been on my mind a lot lately since I'm currently reading a book about religious delusions at the moment. I am, however, glad that I've getting this chance to go through these books again as an adult, to fully appreciate them for what they are. ( )
  Kassilem | Jun 14, 2016 |
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"The Magician's Nephew" glows with the sort of mythology that C. S. Lewis created at his best, replete with religious and philosophic implication. At the same time, it held my children, and me, spellbound from start to finish.
added by Shortride | editThe New York Times Book Review, Chad Walsh (pay site) (Oct 30, 1955)
 

» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
C. S. Lewisprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baynes, PaulineCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baynes, PaulineIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Branagh, KennethNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, DianeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, LeoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Georg, ThomasIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hallqvist, Britt G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hane, RogerCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hämäläinen, KyllikkiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lavis, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neckenauer, UllaÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nielsen, CliffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rochère, Cécile Dutheil de laTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Van Allsburg, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
To The Kilmer Family
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This is a story about something that happened long ago when your grandfather was a child.
Quotations
A terrible thirst and hunger came over him and a longing to taste that fruit. He put it hastily into his pocket; but there were plenty of others. Could it be wrong to taste one? After all, he thought, the notice on the gate might not have been exactly an order; it might have been only a piece of advice - and who cares about advice?
Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed.
For what you see and hear depends a good deal on where you are standing: it also depends on what sort of person you are.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Please do NOT combine "The Magician's Nephew" with "The Chronicles of Narnia".
Unabridged - please do NOT combine with any abridged edition.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0064471101, Mass Market Paperback)

This large, deluxe hardcover edition of the first title in the classic Chronicles of Narnia series, The Magician's Nephew, is a gorgeous introduction to the magical land of Narnia. The many readers who discovered C.S. Lewis's Chronicles through The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe will be delighted to find that the next volume in the series is actually the first in the sequence--and a step back in time. In this unforgettable story, British schoolchildren Polly and Digory inadvertently tumble into the Wood Between the Worlds, where they meet the evil Queen Jadis and, ultimately, the great, mysterious King Aslan. We witness the birth of Narnia and discover the legendary source of all the adventures that are to follow in the seven books that comprise the series.

Rich, heavy pages, a gold-embossed cover, and Pauline Baynes's original illustrations (hand-colored by the illustrator herself 40 years later) make this special edition of a classic a bona fide treasure. (Ages 9 and older) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:23 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

When Digory and Polly try to return the wicked witch Jadis to her own world, the magic gets mixed up and they all land in Narnia where they witness Aslan blessing the animals with human speech.

(summary from another edition)

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