HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Broad Fork: Recipes for the Wide World of Vegetables and Fruits

by Hugh Acheson

Other authors: Rinne Allen (Photographer)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
583349,814 (4.17)None
In The Broad Fork, Hugh narrates the four seasons of produce, inspired by the most-asked question at the market- "What the hell do I do with kohlrabi?" And so here are 50 ingredients--from kohlrabi to carrots, beets to Brussels sprouts--demystified or reintroduced to us through 200 recipes- three quick hits to get us excited and one more elaborate dish. For apples in the fall there's apple butter; snapper ceviche with apple and lime; and pork tenderloin and roasted apple. In the summer, Hugh explores uses for berries, offering recipes for blackberry vinegar, pickled blueberries, and raspberry cobbler with drop biscuits. Beautifully written, this book brings fresh produce to the center of your plate. It's what both your doctor and your grocery bill have been telling you to do, and Hugh gives us the knowledge and the inspiration to wrap ourselves around produce in new ways.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
We belong to a CSA, and sometimes we get a LOT of veg- some of which it can be hard to use. This book- like the "Victory Garden Cookbook" (another go-to)- promises to give lots of ideas about what to do with that celariac. The main difference is that Broad Fork is more "cheffy"- though not inaccessibly so- and Victory Garden is more middle-America.

I love that preserving and fermenting are included! My first project will be to can some spiced blueberries, and I am contemplating kimchee as well. If these, and a a couple more recipes, go well, I'll probably get the hardcover version to supplement the ebook. (I bought the ebook at a discounted price from the listed one.)

It's a very exciting cookbook! I bookmarked the recipes I wanted to try... and there are SO MANY!

I do love the format: season first, then vegetable (or fruit), with various options. ( )
  cissa | Aug 18, 2017 |
Fantastic recipes for fruits and vegetables! There was barely a page that didn't show something I want to try, and the photographs are plentiful and gorgeous. Definitely a book for anyone's collection. ( )
  Gingermama | Jan 24, 2016 |
Hugh Acheson is a James Beard award winning chef/author and a judge on Bravo's Top Chef. The Broad Fork is his third cookbook and the focus is on seasonal vegetables and fruits. I think Acheson described his book best on his introduction- "The recipes here are all about vegetables- what to do with them, ideas to get you excited to cook and eat them. It's not manual to a vegetarian lifestyle, but rather a compendium of seasonal recipes to help you bring vegetables to the center of your plate."

Prior to reading this book I could count with both hands the amount of vegetarian main dishes that I could make. I like vegetables but I guess my brain was wired to treat them as side dishes and companion to whatever protein I'm eating. Yet, some of my favorite all-time comfort food are vegetable based such as ratatouille and eggplant parmigiana. I'm a huge fan of my local farmer's market and vegetable stands. I have access to great varieties of seasonal fresh veggies and fruits in Philadelphia but I usually buy the same exact vegetables year-round because let's be honest some veggies just looks intimidating.

This book is divided into the four seasons starting with fall, winter, spring and the summer offerings. Since I rarely read cookbooks cover to cover I decided to browse the book, mark down recipes that I would like to make and dived into the summer recipes. There's usually between 2-4 recipes per vegetable/fruit and what I like about this book is that Acheson goes from something basic and simple to something fancy. Beans for example- the first recipe introduced is a fried green beans with yogurt sauce. Second recipe? Green beans with tarragon-lemon sabayon. Now, yes if you are chefy a sabayon may not be something that's totally 'fancy' but I can count the number of episodes where chefs go home on a cooking competition because their custard falls apart. Another example is sweet potatoes which I love. This time three recipes on one page: first- simple sweet potatoes, second- sweet potato gratin and finally glazed sweet potatoes with maple gastrique. What's great about this book is that he introduced me to a new way of thinking about vegetables and fruits. Who knew that blackberry goes well with red meat? And now I know what to do when I see a salsify or a kohlrabi. I also thoroughly appreciate all of Acheson's cooking tips and personal commentary in this book such as "Is there a really a backlash against kale?"

I enjoy reading cookbooks where the chef is clearly passionate about food and even though his book is vegetable-centric it never came off as patronizing. You can see how much his southern roots plays off in his recipes and it's fantastic. The Broad Fork is truly a great addition to any home cook's library but instead of going to my bookshelf, this book is staying in the kitchen where it belongs. ( )
  jnat88 | Aug 16, 2015 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Acheson, HughAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, RinnePhotographersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

In The Broad Fork, Hugh narrates the four seasons of produce, inspired by the most-asked question at the market- "What the hell do I do with kohlrabi?" And so here are 50 ingredients--from kohlrabi to carrots, beets to Brussels sprouts--demystified or reintroduced to us through 200 recipes- three quick hits to get us excited and one more elaborate dish. For apples in the fall there's apple butter; snapper ceviche with apple and lime; and pork tenderloin and roasted apple. In the summer, Hugh explores uses for berries, offering recipes for blackberry vinegar, pickled blueberries, and raspberry cobbler with drop biscuits. Beautifully written, this book brings fresh produce to the center of your plate. It's what both your doctor and your grocery bill have been telling you to do, and Hugh gives us the knowledge and the inspiration to wrap ourselves around produce in new ways.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.17)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5 2
4 2
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 157,164,205 books! | Top bar: Always visible