HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

I, Fly: The Buzz About Flies and How Awesome…
Loading...

I, Fly: The Buzz About Flies and How Awesome They Are (edition 2016)

by Bridget Heos (Author), Jennifer Plecas (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
967217,859 (4.15)2
"Fly is fed up with everyone studying butterflies. After all, flies go through metamorphosis too--and they are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies--maggots--are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that? Both funny and informative, this earnest (and highly partisan) narrator provides a refreshing new perspective on his fascinating species."--… (more)
Member:mrsk4
Title:I, Fly: The Buzz About Flies and How Awesome They Are
Authors:Bridget Heos (Author)
Other authors:Jennifer Plecas (Illustrator)
Info:(2016)
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

I, Fly: The Buzz About Flies and How Awesome They Are by Bridget Heos

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
Children will love to learn more about flies with this I, Fly Book. This is a fun informational book that is easy for students to read, but also for them to comprehend. This is a great book to introduce students to informational text. Children will love looking at the bright and colorful pictures as I, Fly shares information all about himself-flies. This book would be a great resource for students to use when they are doing an insect research report. This book could be paired with videos and other books about flies. This would be a great way to differentiate the lesson. Students could be using this book as a resource and the vocabulary, wording, and content is informative, yet simple.
  katieronning | Jul 19, 2020 |
This informational children's book discusses the life cycle of fly. It introduces key vocabulary terms with context clues and explicit definitions to help with meaning. The pictures are interesting and the book is written in the perspective of a fly telling the story of his life. I think that style can help grab students attention while still relaying the facts. I would use this to highlight key ideas and vocabulary like metamorphosis, larvae, pupae, etc. According to Scholastic, the readability level of this book is about 2nd grade. I would have my students order the stages of a fly's life with movable pictures after reading this book. ( )
  Katie_Morgan | Apr 27, 2020 |
This book is very useful to bring reading into a science classroom. There are a lot of vocabulary words that teachers can talk about and go over after or before reading this book. The text and pictures are very interactive for children due to the dialogue and speech bubbles within. ( )
  caitlinpw | Nov 4, 2016 |
I, Fly is an excellent twist to the ever over popularized "butterfly lessons" that many schools teach to young children in science classes. This book revolves around a fly that is sick of children only learning about butterflies when it comes to insect metamorphosis. He goes on to list several fly facts such as: life cycle, diet, anatomy, behavior, survival, and benefits/problems. This is a good book to instill scientific curiosity to young children by retaining the feel and look of a children's picture book but giving relevant and advanced facts about flies. Children can then go on and research their own facts about an insect or animal of their choice as a follow up activity. ( )
  wxv002 | Sep 6, 2016 |
What is it about flies that children love? They are pests that adults are constantly trying to get rid of but some of children's favorite fiction books feature the fly. In I, Fly, children, of all ages but particularly suited for k-2 grade, learn about the common household pest.

A fly zooms into the classroom to advocate for studying flies over butterflies. According to the fly, flies are beautiful to and have the same life cycle. Instead of eating flowers like the "fancy-schmancy caterpillars", flies eat poop and trash. He goes on to describe his unique flying skills. Then he takes questions from the students. When the students decide to capture him to study, he asks to be released. Before leaving, he offers a few more facts. The book contains a colorful glossary and bibliography.

The text and pictures include cartoon illustrations, speech bubbles mixed in with paragraphs, and diagrams. The main character, the fly, takes center stage but his speaking style and humor will engage students and make learning about the common housefly interesting.
  sherylforsman | Jul 25, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"Fly is fed up with everyone studying butterflies. After all, flies go through metamorphosis too--and they are so much cooler! They flap their wings 200 times a second, compared to a butterfly's measly five to twelve times. Their babies--maggots--are much cuter than caterpillars (obviously). And when they eat solid food, they even throw up on it to turn it into a liquid. Who wouldn't want to study an insect like that? Both funny and informative, this earnest (and highly partisan) narrator provides a refreshing new perspective on his fascinating species."--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.15)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5 2
4 5
4.5 1
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 157,220,592 books! | Top bar: Always visible