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The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in…
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The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice

by Christopher Hitchens

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 34 mentions

English (23)  German (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (25)
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
We should always be careful who we place on a pedestal, and we should always keep our eyes open when we do. Mother Teresa is the best example of this - she is regarded as a saint by so many, and yet - why? In this longform essay, Christopher Hitchens sets himself the task of demolishing the mythology of the Albanian nun, and so proves himself the ultimate iconoclast along the way. A quick read - but then everything Hitchens wrote is a quick read, it's so good. ( )
  soylentgreen23 | Feb 19, 2019 |
Perhaps a little short - as others have said, it would have been good to see Hitchens take twice as many pages to eviscerate Mother Theresa. Nevertheless, Hitchens is always a great read and he covers the topic reasonably completely. ( )
  adam.currey | Sep 24, 2018 |
"Anyone with ambivalent feelings about the influence of Catholic dogma
(especially concerning sex and procreation); about the media''s manufacture of
images; or about what one can, should or shouldn't do for someone less
fortunate, should read this book." --back cover
  collectionmcc | Mar 6, 2018 |
I already knew Hitchens' criticism of Mother Theresa's work, but it was still interesting to read the argument in full form. Did you ever wonder what happened to all the money donated to Mother Theresa? I did.

Not the easiest read, at least for me. Fortunately I had a dictionary handy to look up all the missing vocabulary. The winning sentence contained 4 words that I didn't know. ( )
  automatthias | Jun 19, 2017 |
Punches pulled = 0 ( )
  ColinThompson | Oct 18, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Christopher Hitchensprimary authorall editionscalculated
Mallon, ThomasForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prebble, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Edwin and Gertrude Blue; saintly but secular.
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Who would be so base as to pick on a wizened, shrivelled old lady, well stricken in years, who has consecrated her entire life to the needy and the destitute?
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 185984054X, Paperback)

What's next--The Girl Scouts: The Untold Story? How could anybody write a debunking book about Mother Teresa and her Missionaries of Charity order? Well, in this little cruise missile of a book, Hitchens quickly establishes that the idea is not without point. After all, what is Mother Teresa doing hanging out with a dictator's wife in Haiti and accepting over a million dollars from Charles Keating? The most riveting material in the book is contained in two letters: one from Mother Teresa to Judge Lance Ito--then weighing what sentence to dole out to the convicted Keating--which cited all the work Keating has done "to help the poor," and another from a Los Angeles deputy D.A., Paul Turley, back to Mother Teresa that eloquently stated that rather than working to reduce Keating's sentence, she should return the money he gave her to its rightful owners, the defrauded bond-holders. (Significantly, Mother Teresa never replied.) And why do former missionary workers and visiting doctors consistently observe that the order's medical practices seem so inadequate, especially given all the money that comes in? (Hitchens acidly observes that on the other hand, Mother Teresa herself always manages to receive world-class medical care.) Hitchens's answer is that Mother Teresa is first and foremost interested not in providing medical treatment, but in furthering Catholic doctrine and--quite literally--becoming a saint.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:17 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, feted by politicians, the Church and the world's media, Mother Teresa of Calcutta appears to be on the fast track to sainthood. But what, asks Christopher Hitchens, makes Mother Teresa so divine? In a frank expose of the Teresa cult, Hitchens details the nature and limits of one woman's mission to the world's poor. He probes the source of the heroic status bestowed upon an Albanian nun whose only declared wish is to serve God. He asks whether Mother Teresa's good works answer any higher purpose than the need of the world's privileged to see someone, somewhere, doing something for the Third World. He unmasks pseudo-miracles, questions Mother Teresa's fitness to adjudicate on matters of sex and reproduction, and reports on a version of saintly ubiquity which affords genial relations with dictators, corrupt tycoons and convicted frauds.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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