HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins
Loading...

Gold Fame Citrus (2015)

by Claire Vaye Watkins

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3822728,205 (3.42)32
  1. 40
    Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (BeckyJG)
  2. 10
    You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine by Alexandra Kleeman (rjuris)
  3. 00
    The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi (sturlington)
    sturlington: Contrasting stories of climate change and water shortages in the Southwestern US.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 32 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
This book had some good parts. I did not hate reading the entirety of it, which is why I settled on 2 stars instead of 1. But then I got to the end, and I almost literally threw it across the room, because wow was that awful.
  photonegative | May 10, 2018 |
I was always needing saving. That was our deal -- damsel, woodsman.

This book was a bust for me. The synopsis sounded intriguing enough, but like shiny objects lure in a cat, I think I was tricked by the gorgeous cover art (so pretty!)

I'm not the type of person who needs to love the characters in order to love a book; in fact I prefer a good villain or a complicated personality (Adelina from [b:The Young Elites|20821111|The Young Elites (The Young Elites, #1)|Marie Lu|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/books/1407318399s/20821111.jpg|25217978] or Teo in [b:Perfect Days|25716724|Perfect Days|Raphael Montes|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/books/1453061925s/25716724.jpg|40704550]. But the characters in Gold Fame Citrus fell flat for me again and again.

Because the reader spends the most time getting to know Luz, it was particularly painful to have such a flawed female character who seems to hero worship the men in her life (even when they clearly don't deserve such admiration). From the very first pages of the novel, I found myself frustrated reading about Luz trying on fancy dresses while Ray is outside working on irrigation issues. There's something irrational and silly about her and there never seems to be any growth despite the events that happen throughout the course of the novel.

Unfortunately, the reader doesn't spend enough time with Ray to really formulate a real understanding of his character and too often I found myself not really caring what happened to him. The only other character that played a major role, Levy, was no better. While he was a bit more visible throughout the story than Ray, I was in awe of how so many people could see him as their capable leader when all I could see was a God complex and a serious touch of crazy. Because I just finished this book after reading Emma Cline's [b:The Girls|26893819|The Girls|Emma Cline|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/books/1464528839s/26893819.jpg|42856015], it was easy to draw parallels between the two stories (what is it about cults that are so fascinating?!), but while Cline's novel left me twisted up over Evie at times, I did not feel any sort of connection to Luz.

The format of the novel is also difficult to really explain and it was just as difficult for me to grasp. Luz's and Ray's journey is interrupted throughout the story by chapters that read more like an encyclopedia - some describing how the state of the planet came to be, others that were more philosophical (two words - mole man) and difficult to really understand in relation to the main plot. I initially enjoyed the interruptions, but found as the story progressed that I really didn't have the concentration necessary to even read through them all.

I'm a huge fan of dystopians (anything [a:Margaret Atwood|3472|Margaret Atwood|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/authors/1282859073p2/3472.jpg] writes is sacred) and there are books similar to Gold Fame Citrus that I would recommend to anyone who would let me rave about them - [b:The Road|6288|The Road|Cormac McCarthy|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/books/1439197219s/6288.jpg|3355573], [b:Bird Box|18498558|Bird Box|Josh Malerman|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/books/1383949470s/18498558.jpg|26186624], and [b:Rivers|16130400|Rivers|Michael Farris Smith|https://d2arxad8u2l0g7.cloudfront.net/books/1374595954s/16130400.jpg|21955410] are just the first few that come to mind. As is bound to happen once in awhile, Gold Fame Citrus was just not my dystopian cup of tea.

( )
  PagesandPints | Oct 3, 2016 |
According to one of the main characters everyone who moved to California was seeking one of three things: gold, fame or citrus. I would have thought sun and warmth would have played some role in the decision but undeniably these three make a good book title. In addition to being lures these three things also prove to be evanescent. Most miners in the California Gold Rush moved on to other locations after a few years. The actors and actresses seeking fame in the movie industry probably had to supplement their income by working as bartenders, wait staff or prostitutes. As for citrus (and other crops), when the water for irrigation disappears no more fruit can be grown.

This story takes place after the rivers and wells in the interior valleys have completely dried up and a large sand dune sea has taken over. Luz Dunn, her partner Ray and a child called Ig are trying to escape California by driving east. Luz and Ray took Ig from a group of wasted drifters because they were not looking after her. Once they had Ig it became obvious to Luz and Ray that California was no place to try to raise a child. They try to plan for any eventuality but no-one realized how massive the dune sea had grown. When they ran out of gas along the northern edge of the sand Ray leaves Luz and Ig to try to find some help. Luz is near death from sunstroke when Levi, leader of a small group living on the edge of the dunes, finds her and Ig. When Luz is recovered she wants to look for Ray but Levi tells her that he died. He shows her some of Ray's belongings and points out a spot covered over by sand that he says is where he found Ray's body. Levi is conveniently nearby when Luz recovers from her grief and soon Luz is Levi's woman. Ig is looked after by the whole group and especially by Dallas who had given birth to a stillborn child shortly before Luz and Ig arrived. Her breast milk sustains Ig. Levi is a dowser and can find water anywhere. The group grows food and they even have a narcotic root to chew. It is all quite idyllic. Or is it?

The author has developed a convincing post-apocalyptic world. Her writing is top-notch but I wasn't quite convinced by her characters. Although Watkins has them crying often they seemed wooden and one-dimensional. I suspect that Watkins will improve with time. This is her first novel although she has previously written a book of short stories. I think she bears watching. ( )
1 vote gypsysmom | Aug 5, 2016 |
This novel started off swimmingly (HA HA): after years of drought, much of central and desert CA has been enveloped by a huge dune, a sea of sand. Nevada and Arizona is not better off and all 3 states (or parts) have been evacuated to the north and east, where "Mojavs" are treated as "Okies" were generations ago.

But not everyone left. Some stayed--the unbelievers, those with warrants, those who want to be heros. They are given ration colas and regularly ransack empty stores and homes.

Ray and Luz stayed behind. Now it is too late to leave--no more evacuations, and Oregon has a guarded border. Leaving through the dune is crazy. Maybe?

After the great start, this book went off on an unbelievable tangent. Yes that means the first part was believable, as I sit here with my dead lawn, overheated house, checking on fires to figure out if we can go out of town soon or not. But the unbelievable tangent had promise--until it went of the deep end and didn't. ( )
  Dreesie | Aug 3, 2016 |
Gold Fame Citrus is a dystopian novel set in a dying, drought ridden California. Listening to it, I found the prose difficult to follow and somewhat pretentious for the first quarter of the novel. I did become caught up in the story, however, as it progressed and began to find the two main characters' budding hope of a better world and life interesting as they took a toddler under their wing and set out to find a better life.

I prefer a more linear storyline and style in audio and soon realized I probably would have preferred this novel if I had read it. None-the-less, it ended up as a 4 star book for me. ( )
1 vote TheDenizen | May 31, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
There it is. Take it.

William Mullholland
Dedication
FOR D.A.P.
First words
Punting the prairie dog into the library was a mistake.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Unrelenting drought has transfigured Southern California into a surreal, phantasmagoric landscape. With the Central Valley barren, underground aquifer drained, and Sierra snowpack entirely depleted, most “Mojavs,” prevented by both armed vigilantes and an indifferent bureaucracy from freely crossing borders to lusher regions, have allowed themselves to be evacuated to internment camps. In Los Angeles’ Laurel Canyon, two young Mojavs—Luz, once a poster child for the Bureau of Conservation and its enemies, and Ray, a veteran of the “forever war” turned surfer—squat in a starlet’s abandoned mansion. Holdouts, they subsist on rationed cola and whatever they can loot, scavenge, and improvise.

The couple’s fragile love somehow blooms in this arid place, and for the moment, it seems enough. But when they cross paths with a mysterious child, the thirst for a better future begins. They head east, a route strewn with danger: sinkholes and patrolling authorities, bandits and the brutal, omnipresent sun. Ghosting after them are rumors of a visionary dowser—a diviner for water—and his followers, who whispers say have formed a colony at the edge of a mysterious sea of dunes.
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"The much-anticipated first novel from a Story Prize-winning "5 Under 35" fiction writer. In 2012, Claire Vaye Watkins's story collection, Battleborn, swept nearly every award for short fiction. Now this young writer, widely heralded as a once-in-a-generation talent, returns with a first novel that harnesses the sweeping vision and deep heart that made her debut so arresting to a love story set in a devastatingly imagined near future. Unrelenting drought has transfigured Southern California into a surreal, phantasmagoric landscape. With the Central Valley barren, underground aquifer drained, and Sierra snowpack entirely depleted, most "Mojavs," prevented by both armed vigilantes and an indifferent bureaucracy from freely crossing borders to lusher regions, have allowed themselves to be evacuated to internment camps. In Los Angeles' Laurel Canyon, two young Mojavs. Luz, once a poster child for the Bureau of Conservation and its enemies, and Ray, a veteran of the "forever war" turned surfer--squat in a starlet's abandoned mansion. Holdouts, they subsist on rationed cola and whatever they can loot, scavenge, and improvise. The couple's fragile love somehow blooms in this arid place, and for the moment, it seems enough. But when they cross paths with a mysterious child, the thirst for a better future begins. They head east, a route strewn with danger: sinkholes and patrolling authorities, bandits and the brutal, omnipresent sun. Ghosting after them are rumors of a visionary dowser a diviner for waterand his followers, who whispers say have formed a colony at the edge of a mysterious sea of dunes. Immensely moving, profoundly disquieting, and mind-blowingly original, Watkins's novel explores the myths we believe about others and tell about ourselves, the double-edged power of our most cherished relationships, and the shape of hope in a precarious future that may be our own"--… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.42)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 12
2.5 3
3 25
3.5 8
4 28
4.5 5
5 8

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,368,723 books! | Top bar: Always visible