HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold…
Loading...

The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal (2015)

by David E. Hoffman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
239948,266 (3.86)3

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Very good read. Factual book about one of the most useful spies inside the USSR. Learned a lot. ( )
  ikeman100 | Feb 4, 2018 |
Good. but not as good as his last one - The Dead Hand. Of course that one won a prize. This one told some neat stories about cold War spy efforts against the Russians. Some of the stories I knew, others were new to me. The story was fast paced and well told. Gave some good insight on the methods used. ( )
  bermandog | Dec 30, 2016 |
Joy's review: The pretty incredible story of probably the most productive spy America has ever had. Operating in Moscow at the height of the cold war, Tolkachev passed literally billions of dollars worth of secrets to the US. Spoiler: it does not end well for him. I could have used a bit more context and a bit less of model numbers of airplanes and such, but still a gripping story. ( )
  konastories | Dec 2, 2016 |
Fantastic! It kept me on the edge of my seat. ( )
  tamarah71 | Sep 5, 2016 |
The Billion Dollar Spy is a wonderful non-fiction account of one of the greatest espionage assets ever developed by the US. It's well-written, albeit dryly in most cases, but moves along at a good pace. Unlike most fiction, a happy ending isn't in the cards, but the real life examples provided in the epilogue of the fruits of Adolf Tolkachev's clandestine labors in effect served that purpose.

As a lifelong lover of spy fiction, it's always a pleasure to read good non-fiction on the subject. The fiction may be a little more fun to experience, but the real stuff brings it all into sharper focus.

This is a fascinating example of how the world of espionage worked in the Cold War era. The scale of what was accomplished is incredible and far beyond what you'd normally see in a novel. It's well worth the investment of a little time to experience a description of how the way-behind-the-scenes spy world worked in an era that many are still familiar with. I recommend it highly. ( )
  gmmartz | Jun 21, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0385537603, Hardcover)

From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning history The Dead Hand comes the riveting story of a spy who cracked open the Soviet military research establishment and a penetrating portrait of the CIA’s Moscow station, an outpost of daring espionage in the last years of the Cold War
 
   While driving out of the American embassy in Moscow on the evening of February 16, 1978, the chief of the CIA’s Moscow station heard a knock on his car window. A man on the curb handed him an envelope whose contents stunned U.S. intelligence: details of top-secret Soviet research and developments in military technology that were totally unknown to the United States. In the years that followed, the man, Adolf Tolkachev, an engineer in a Soviet military design bureau, used his high-level access to hand over tens of thousands of pages of technical secrets. His revelations allowed America to reshape its weapons systems to defeat Soviet radar on the ground and in the air, giving the United States near total superiority in the skies over Europe.
   One of the most valuable spies to work for the United States in the four decades of global confrontation with the Soviet Union, Tolkachev took enormous personal risks—but so did the Americans. The CIA had long struggled to recruit and run agents in Moscow, and Tolkachev was a singular breakthrough. Using spy cameras and secret codes as well as face-to-face meetings in parks and on street corners, Tolkachev and his handlers succeeded for years in eluding the feared KGB in its own backyard, until the day came when a shocking betrayal put them all at risk. 
   Drawing on previously secret documents obtained from the CIA and on interviews with participants, David Hoffman has created an unprecedented and poignant portrait of Tolkachev, a man motivated by the depredations of the Soviet state to master the craft of spying against his own country. Stirring, unpredictable, and at times unbearably tense, The Billion Dollar Spy is a brilliant feat of reporting that unfolds like an espionage thriller.

(retrieved from Amazon Sat, 04 Jul 2015 02:42:29 -0400)

"While getting into his car on the evening of February 16, 1978, the chief of the CIA's Moscow station was handed an envelope by an unknown Russian. Its contents stunned the Americans: details of top-secret Soviet research and development in military technology that was totally unknown to the United States. From 1979 to 1985, Adolf Tolkachev, an engineer at a military research center, cracked open the secret Soviet military research establishment, using his access to hand over tens of thousands of pages of material about the latest advances in aviation technology, alerting the Americans to possible developments years in the future. He was one of the most productive and valuable spies ever to work for the United States in the four decades of global confrontation with the Soviet Union. Tolkachev took enormous personal risks, but so did his CIA handlers. Moscow station was a dangerous posting to the KGB's backyard. The CIA had long struggled to recruit and run agents in Moscow, and Tolkachev became a singular breakthrough. With hidden cameras and secret codes, and in face-to-face meetings with CIA case officers in parks and on street corners, Tolkachev and the CIA worked to elude the feared KGB. Drawing on previously secret documents obtained from the CIA, as well as interviews with participants, Hoffman reveals how the depredations of the Soviet state motivated one man to master the craft of spying against his own nation until he was betrayed to the KGB by a disgruntled former CIA trainee. No one has ever told this story before in such detail, and Hoffman's deep knowledge of spycraft, the Cold War, and military technology makes him uniquely qualified to bring readers this real-life espionage thriller"--Provided by publisher.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.86)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 10
3.5 5
4 22
4.5 4
5 10

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,324,567 books! | Top bar: Always visible