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After Alice by Gregory Maguire
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After Alice

by Gregory Maguire

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7915517,419 (2.81)29
  1. 10
    A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare (charlie68)
    charlie68: Both explore the madness of 'love'.
  2. 00
    Fifteen Dogs by André Alexis (charlie68)
    charlie68: Both books explore the meanings and absurdity of language in a playful manner.
  3. 00
    The Complete Fairy Tales by George MacDonald (charlie68)
    charlie68: Similar themes throughout.
  4. 00
    The Light Princess and Other Stories by George MacDonald (charlie68)
    charlie68: Similar themes in both.
  5. 00
    Phantastes by George MacDonald (charlie68)
    charlie68: It's great book, similar to the Alice books in a lot of ways. The main characters go on a fantastic journey.
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» See also 29 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
Too wordy and not a bit interesting to read. Gave up after 31% and decided to try something else instead...

( )
  MaraBlaise | May 19, 2019 |
I had a very hard time getting into this book. I fell asleep during the first chapter, skipped to the second and was relieved that it almost went straight into chapter 3. By chapter 7 I was like "COME ON!!" I didn't even finish it, I couldn't because I was absolutely not interested in anything going on and thought it dragged on to nothing. I hate not finishing a book but I just could not go on any further. Sad thing is is that I read his other books and really liked them and had high hopes for this one.
  Wapil | Mar 23, 2019 |
I had a very hard time getting into this book. I fell asleep during the first chapter, skipped to the second and was relieved that it almost went straight into chapter 3. By chapter 7 I was like "COME ON!!" I didn't even finish it, I couldn't because I was absolutely not interested in anything going on and thought it dragged on to nothing. I hate not finishing a book but I just could not go on any further. Sad thing is is that I read his other books and really liked them and had high hopes for this one.
  Wapil | Mar 23, 2019 |
Couldn’t get into this one. ( )
  Arkrayder | Feb 21, 2019 |
Dear me. I am so conflicted! See, on the one hand Gregory Maguire is one of my all time favorite writers. His ability to spin in his own particular brand of whimsy into classic tales is unrivaled. I've loved every single one of his books that I've set my hands on. Which is why I had such high hopes for this particular story. Alice in Wonderland is an iconic piece of childhood. Everyone knows it in some capacity or another. For me, it was the book I most loved to have read to me before bed. I've read every iteration of it that I could get. Needless to say, I was thrilled to read this.

Now, I find myself finished and rather conflicted about After Alice. I'll start with the good. First off, Maguire does indeed pay homage to his source material. Readers can expect to see cameos from some of their favorite quirky characters, and Ada's interactions with them are just as delightful as her predecessors. Also, the whole feel of the original is still here. The erudite vocabulary, the nonsense that isn't quite nonsense, all of it is there in vivid color. The portions that take place in Wonderland are simply darling. Ada's stubborn ways, pitted against the inhabitants of this wonderful world, were just too much fun.

What brings this book down, in my opinion, is its use of dual points of view. Lydia, Alice's older sister, has her own experiences chronicled in alternating chapters. Which means, of course, that every other chapter is filled with her Lydia's own musings and personality. Lydia isn't easy to like. She is, in fact, rather insufferable. Having her chapters mixed in with Ada's own whimsical ones made this book more difficult to read than I expected. I almost wanted to skip every other chapter, just to get back to Wonderland. If this book had focused solely on Ada's chapters, you would see a much different review being written. That part, I loved.

So, final thoughts? This isn't Maguire's strongest book. While it definitely has a lot in it to love, I feel like long time readers of Maguire's works will probably fall into the same boat that I am in right now. Feeling torn between wanting to love this, and dreaming of what might have been. There is still much of the Maguire magic in this book! If you're a completionist, I'd still give this a spot on your TBR. ( )
  roses7184 | Feb 5, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gregory Maguireprimary authorall editionscalculated
Johnson, AdamCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kerner, Jamie LynnDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Alice took up the fan and gloves, and, as the hall was very hot, she kept fanning herself all the time she went on talking: 'Dear, dear! How queer everything is to-day! And yesterday things went on just as usual. I wonder if I've been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I'm not the same, the next question is, Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle!' And she began thinking over all the children she knew that were of the same age as herself, to see if she could have been changed for any of them.

'I'm sure I'm not Ada,' she said, 'for her hair goes in such long ringlets, and mine doesn't go in ringlets at all; and I'm sure I can't be Mabel, for I know all sorts of things, and she, oh! she knows such a very little! Besides, she's she, and I'm I, and—oh dear, how puzzling it all is!...'

—Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Dedication
For Natacha Liuzzi
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Were there a god in charge of story—I mean one cut to Old Testament specifics, some hybrid of Zeus and Father Christmas—such a creature, such a deity, might be looking down upon a day opening in Oxford, England, a bit past the half-way mark of the nineteenth century.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060548959, Hardcover)

From the multi-million-copy bestselling author of Wicked comes a magical new twist on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, published to coincide with the 150th anniversary of Lewis’s Carroll’s beloved classic.

When Alice toppled down the rabbit-hole 150 years ago, she found a Wonderland as rife with inconsistent rules and abrasive egos as the world she left behind. But what of that world? How did 1860s Oxford react to Alice’s disappearance?

In this brilliant work of fiction, Gregory Maguire turns his dazzling imagination to the question of underworlds, undergrounds, underpinnings—and understandings old and new, offering an inventive spin on Carroll’s enduring tale. Ada, a friend of Alice’s mentioned briefly in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, is off to visit her friend, but arrives a moment too late—and tumbles down the rabbit-hole herself.

Ada brings to Wonderland her own imperfect apprehension of cause and effect as she embarks on an odyssey to find Alice and see her safely home from this surreal world below the world. If Eurydice can ever be returned to the arms of Orpheus, or Lazarus can be raised from the tomb, perhaps Alice can be returned to life. Either way, everything that happens next is “After Alice.”

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 06 Jul 2015 18:21:10 -0400)

When Alice toppled down the rabbit-hole 150 years ago, she found a Wonderland as rife with inconsistent rules and abrasive egos as the world she left behind. But what of that world? How did 1860s Oxford react to Alice's disappearance? Ada, a friend of Alice's mentioned briefly in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, is off to visit her friend, but arrives a moment too late--and tumbles down the rabbit-hole herself. Ada brings to Wonderland her own imperfect apprehension of cause and effect as she embarks on an odyssey to find Alice and see her safely home from this surreal world below the world.… (more)

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