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Writing for Museums by Margot Wallace
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Writing for Museums

by Margot Wallace

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This book could easily be titled "Best Ways to Communicate" - and the lessons taught are applicable to not only museums but ANY non-profit organization seeking to understand the best ways and means of reaching out to present and potential audiences. The examples used by the author are VERY relevant and timely. They're illustrated with examples that anyone will readily appreciate. If you're responsible for writing brochures, blog posts, or ANY front-facing material, you should really read this book. I was extremely impressed! ( )
  minfo | Sep 5, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 144222763X, Hardcover)

Words are everywhere in the museum. Amidst all the visual exhibits, and in many non-exhibition areas, swarm a host of words, talking to a vast swath of people in ways that visuals cannot. Signage at the information desk, brochures, exhibition videos, guided tours, membership materials, apps, and store labels: in a multi-screen world, where information explodes in every corner of the field of vision, clarity comes from the presence of words among the feast of visuals, helping contemporary audiences feel at home. Research bears out the need for a range of learning tools and it’s not just visitors who benefit from verbal cues; donors, educators, community partners, and volunteers will all engage more effectively with the museum that explains its brand mission with good writing. Whether written by administrators, staffers, freelancers, or interns, words are delivered by people in your museums with the knowledge, to be interpreted by strangers. Your story is told everywhere, and with each narration it reinforces your brand; hopefully every single word reflects your brand.

Each chapter tells how to put into words the stories you need to tell:

BlogsBrochuresExhibition videosGuided tour scriptsCollateral programming talksMarketing plansProposals to community partners Public Relations releasesSocial MediaSolicitation lettersSurveysVolunteer communications Website
If you ever wished for a good writer, right on staff, ready to take on project, major or routine, here’s the help you’re looking for.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 31 Aug 2015 10:03:01 -0400)

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