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The Sunshine Cruise Company by John Niven
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The Sunshine Cruise Company

by John Niven

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This was ok stuff and you can imagine it as a TV thing. But caper stuff told in a very colloquial idiom sounds at worst like someone telling you a summary of the TV show so it all feels a bit of a hash. That said. I read it. ( )
  adrianburke | Aug 2, 2017 |
What a great story!
It's not only the younger set that have adventures!
Susan and Julie get into all kinds of trouble - bank robbery included.
A lovely story of friendship and excitment.
I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher, Random House Cornerstone, via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review. ( )
  Welsh_eileen2 | Jan 23, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0434023183, Hardcover)

Susan Frobisher and Julie Wickham are turning sixty. They live in a small Dorset town and have been friends since school. On the surface Susan has it all - a lovely house and a long marriage to accountant Barry. Life has not been so kind to Julie, but now, with several failed businesses and bad relationships behind her, she has found stability: living in a council flat and working in an old people's home. Then Susan's world is ripped apart when Barry is found dead in a secret flat - or rather, a sex dungeon. It turns out Barry has been leading a double life as a swinger. He's run up a fortune in debts and now the bank is going to take Susan's home. Until, under the influence of an octogenarian gangster named Nails, the women decide that, rather than let the bank take everything Susan has, they're going to take the bank. With the help of Nails and the thrill-crazy, wheelchair-bound Ethel they pull off the daring robbery, but soon find that getting away with it is not so easy. The Sunshine Cruise Company is a sharp satire on friendship, ageing, the English middle classes and the housing bubble from one of Britain's sharpest and funniest writers.

(retrieved from Amazon Wed, 29 Jul 2015 20:26:05 -0400)

Susan Frobisher and Julie Wickham are turning sixty. They live in a small Dorset town and have been friends since school. On the surface Susan has it all - a lovely house and a long marriage to accountant Barry. Life has not been so kind to Julie, but now, with several failed businesses and bad relationships behind her, she has found stability: living in a council flat and working in an old people's home. Then Susan's world is ripped apart when Barry is found dead in a secret flat - or rather, a sex dungeon. It turns out Barry has been leading a double life as a swinger. He's run up a fortune in debts, and now the bank is going to take Susan's home. Until, under the influence of an octogenarian gangster named Nails, the women decide that, rather than let the bank take everything Susan has, they're going to take the bank.… (more)

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