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The Spice Box Letters by Eve Makis
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The Spice Box Letters

by Eve Makis

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From the first page, I knew that this story was promising.
Sadly, I had never even had an inkling about the tragedy in Armenia. Now I do, and I am so glad that I was introduced to it in such a sweet, yet heartbreaking way.

The Spice Box Letters was a beautiful story about how families are ripped apart by tragedy and tradition, and about how it's possible to put these pieces back together again.

While I did get a little lost with the different perspectives, I did thoroughly enjoy this book (this is coming from me, someone who normally dislikes historical fiction). The story was heartwarming and painfully real, and I recommend it for anyone who wants to understand the world a little better (so, everyone). ( )
  CatherineHsu | Aug 23, 2016 |
*I received this book through LibraryThing Member Giveaways.*

I had a hard time getting into this novel, in part because there are so many first-person narrators and their voices are not as unique as they could be, causing a little confusion. I had also hoped to learned more about the Armenian genocide of 1915, but while this is covered in the book (and provides a major plot device), it is not fully explored and those less familiar with the context might find the book a little hard to follow. I did like how the multiple story lines came together in the end, but overall I just can't stay I liked this book very much. ( )
  wagner.sarah35 | Aug 11, 2016 |
After her beloved grandmother's death, Katerina inherits her journal and a wooden spice box that had been hidden away. Do these items tell the story of Grandmother Mariam's past? Katerina finds herself determined to learn about the childhood her grandmother always refused to discuss. The Spice Box Letters by Eve Makis is a touching story about Katerina's investigation and discovery of her grandmother's early years.

The publisher, St. Martins awarded me a copy of this book through the Member Giveaway program in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  MsNick | Jul 7, 2016 |
I love to read WWI-era fiction, but I'm guilty of forgetting it was truly a world war, not confined to the trenches in France. The Spice Box Letters vividly recreates the pain and terror experienced by Armenian families booted out of their homes in Turkey in 1915. But the story is not all grim--the author hopscotches us back and forth between 1915 Turkey, 1930's Cyprus, and 1985 to introduce us to some warm, cynical, sarcastic, and at times hilarious family members piecing the entire story together. A great read for both recreation and education. ( )
  gmathis | Jun 30, 2016 |
Showing 4 of 4
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