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The Curse of Crow Hollow by Billy Coffey
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The Curse of Crow Hollow

by Billy Coffey

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Something strange is going on in Crow Hollow. People say a witch on the mountain cursed the town many years ago, so have stayed away from her mountain out of fear. The day Cordelia and her friends decided to trespass on the witch’s mountain was the day something caused the girls in town to be stricken with a mysterious illness. As town residents try to find out why the witch has stricken them and how to rid themselves of her reach, they end up turning against each other in ways no one had ever thought could be possible.

A mysterious narrator takes readers through chaos of their own making in a supposedly religious town. Once actually face-to-face with the “evil” they heard about every Sunday morning from their Reverend, they forget what they’ve been taught. Casting suspicious eyes outward rather than inward serves only to fuel the fires of distrust. While echoing some events from the Salem Witch Trials, “The Curse of Crow Hollow” works to show readers what can happen when religion combines with hysteria rather than common sense.

Recommended for Adult readers.

Book review link: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.com/2016/04/03/the-curse-of-crow-hollow-billy-coffey/ ( )
  sunshinealma | Apr 3, 2016 |
Lets start by saying that Mr. Coffey seems to be a good writer. However, for me to like a novel I have to buy into it's premise which I in no way do here. There is an old lady that the entire town thinks is a witch. I cannot believe that in this modern day that there is not a single skeptic. Not one single person is brave enough to confront this elderly woman who has apparently raised her husband from the dead.This is either the greatest example of mass hysteria known to mankind or a town is in the throes of delusional superstition. No town is like this. Even law enforcement is caught up in this. Way too far over the top. ( )
  muddyboy | Dec 10, 2015 |
I was looking for a spooky read for October and I got more than I bargained for in Billy Coffey’s latest novel, The Curse of Crow Hollow. It is indeed a spooky and chill-inducing read, but it is so much more. With its Southern gothic style, its impeccable characterization and Billy’s trademark story-telling, this is a book that will do more than give you the creeps. It’s going to make you think and continue to think long after the last word is shared.

Crow Hollow, Virginia is a small town on the way out. Not many are left in the Hollow — jobs are scarce and its back-woods atmosphere is not likely to attract people or industry. It does have a close-knit community full of gossip, resentment and past sins. And there is a witch on the mountain that overlooks the town. This town is trouble just waiting to happen.

The Curse of Crow Hollow has a first person narrator who is not identified until the end of the book. He is down-home friendly and candid in his description of his fellow citizens. He describes to a visitor what has led up to the current state of the town — burned down buildings and few remaining residents. It’s a ghost story of sorts that begins when four teenagers tangle with the witch and unleash the curse on the whole town. As the story unfolds, the reader is made aware of hidden sins and secrets, deals struck and promises broken. Jealousy and prejudice abounds, though no one wants to acknowledge it, let alone confront it. The whole persona of the town and its people is a mask hiding the ugliness of those determined to go their own way. The town has embraced its isolation from the outside world and from God, although they would never admit that. The curse that takes hold of the town is of their own making, and the evil that has taken hold is not likely to let go any time soon. A few townspeople are determined to make a change and in the end, the reader knows the fight continues, and a sliver of hope remains. The Curse of Crow Hollow is definitely fiction, but completely on the mark for the hypocrisy of a religion without true faith and lives full of sin without repentance. It is riveting and soul-convicting.

I listened to the audiobook version and have to say, if possible, that is the way to read this book. The voice of the narrator is perfect. The last few words spoken made chills run down my spine for quite a long time. Just don’t listen to or read this one after dark, unless you have a very powerful lamp! ;)

Very Highly Recommended.

Audience: adults

Great for Book Clubs.

To purchase this book, click HERE.

(I purchased the audiobook from Audible. All opinions expressed are mine alone.) ( )
  vintagebeckie | Oct 26, 2015 |
Book Review & Giveaway: The Southern Appalachian Mountains and haunted tales seem to go hand in hand. I grew up listening to countless folk tales about those mountains and the bizarre things that happened there so, when I saw Billy Coffey’s The Curse of Crow Hollow, I couldn’t resist and I don’t think you’ll be able to either. Small towns, superstitions, a need to explain the unexplainable – where could it all lead but to trouble with a capital T? And it makes a perfect book giveaway for the Halloween season, so be sure to enter at http://popcornreads.com/?p=8569. ( )
  PopcornReads | Oct 20, 2015 |
This Friday's novel is The Curse of Crow Hollow and I highly recommend it. The story is about five families, but primarily about faith, mystery, occult and mob mentality.

Teens bring on what the town's folk consider a curse. Strange happenings, illness and much more is centered around Alvaretta, the mountain witch. When she places a curse on the four teens that assaulted her, things get hairy.

I found this book a wild ride and especially enjoyed the narrator, who is an elderly local. Coffey gives a great story, using a unique style and keeps readers intrigued- anxiously anticipating the ending. Happily, I didn't figure anything out- It keeps one guessing and a little creeped out!

I would encourage any reader to pick up this book. I must admit, it's a little slow around the center of the book, but the ending is explosive and there are no loose ends, leaving you satisfied.
For more of my review: http://tinyurl.com/o2wo9ac ( )
1 vote AReneeHunt | Aug 27, 2015 |
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Epigraph
Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. Exodus 22:18
Dedication
For Dad
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Come on out that sun and tell me hello.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0718026772, Paperback)

With the “profound sense of Southern spirituality” he is known for (Publishers Weekly), Billy Coffey draws us into a town where good and evil—and myth and reality—intertwine in unexpected ways.

Everyone in Crow Hollow knows of Alvaretta Graves, the old widow who lives in the mountain. Many call her a witch; others whisper she’s insane. Everyone agrees the vengeance Alvaretta swore at her husband’s death hovers over them all. That vengeance awakens when teenagers stumble upon Alvaretta’s cabin, incurring her curse. Now a sickness moves through the Hollow. Rumors swirl that Stu Graves has risen for revenge. And the people of Crow Hollow are left to confront not only the darkness that lives on the mountain, but the darkness that lives within themselves.

“Coffey spins a wicked tale . . . [The Curse of Crow Hollow] blends folklore, superstition, and subconscious dread in the vein of Shirley Jackson’s ‘The Lottery.’”

—Kirkus Reviews

(retrieved from Amazon Fri, 03 Jul 2015 09:25:24 -0400)

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