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Judgment and Mercy: Where Parallel Lines…
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Judgment and Mercy: Where Parallel Lines Meet

by Paul Volk

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 149955916X, Paperback)

"Behold. the Lion that is from the tribe of Judah... has overcome so as to open the book... And I saw a lamb standing, as if slain." How do Judgment and Mercy come together? How can Jesus, the Son of God, be both the Lion of Judah and the Lamb of God? No two creatures are more contrary in character than a lamb and a lion. A lamb is almost embarrassingly meek. Instead of a roar it emits only a bleat. Yet no one in heaven was surprised to discover that the lion and the lamb were not merely standing side by side but were one and the same. The Lion of Judah IS the Lamb of God, without the lion being made in any way less a lion and without the lamb being made in any way less a lamb. What is obvious in heaven can be maddeningly hard to see on earth. Heaven is, after all, the place where parallel lines meet. The counter weight to the revelation of Divine judgment is a mercy revealed at Calvary that exceeds the grasp of my moral imagination by as much as does God's judgment. Knowing God as he really is, is eternal life. This book, through two allegories and some observations from geometry (parallel lines meeting) and everyday life (seeing with two different eyes and hearing with two different ears) makes God known as he really is, as the one God who is perfect in judgment and perfect in mercy.

(retrieved from Amazon Wed, 26 Aug 2015 10:16:58 -0400)

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