HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Krik? Krak! by Edwidge Danticat
Loading...

Krik? Krak! (edition 1996)

by Edwidge Danticat

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7151313,174 (4.07)98
Member:hemlokgang
Title:Krik? Krak!
Authors:Edwidge Danticat
Info:Vintage (1996), Paperback, 240 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:USA, African-American

Work details

Krik? Krak! by Edwidge Danticat

Recently added byTRCatLIU, ASlibraries, DrinkMorri, remy-valero, private library, nancynova, Deadheadchk, CSRodgers
1990s (27)
  1. 10
    The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan (Othemts)
    Othemts: In a superficial way this book reminds me of the stories of Amy Tan in that they show the strains of relationships between mothers and daughters, immigrants and American-born.
  2. 01
    The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien (whymaggiemay)
    whymaggiemay: Tim O'Brien's wonderfully written stories about Vietnam.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 98 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
This was a gripping journey through multiple generations of Haitian women and the people they love. The lyrical prose and stark reality of this work of fiction keep a firm grip on your heart as you read. It is foreign and familiar at the same time.

I always appreciate folklore and this is a fine example of folklore translated by a modern women on the cusp between cultures and times. ( )
  Angelina-Justice | Feb 3, 2014 |
a friend gave me this book during rather a difficult time in my life - witnesses have said that my eyes were pointing in different directions, whatever - and what i remember appreciating most is the fact that they were short stories, so i could set the book down at regular intervals.

but. then i started reading it. and the stories, they were wonderful. touching, enigmatic (but that might not have all been the stories), and written in a crystalline style that i have always appreciated. the book never got put down for any significant length of time. ( )
  cat-ballou | Apr 2, 2013 |
Why did I wait so long to read this book?! This collection of short stories, focusing on Haitian women and women of Haitian descent, deftly demonstrates the social and political culture of the country. Danticat gives readers a real feel for island values and beliefs through her characters' actions and words.

Some of the stories are heart-wrenching, but all of them are beautifully told. I love it when an author gets her message across without directly stating what she wants readers to know. ( )
1 vote bohemiangirl35 | Apr 21, 2012 |
This novel weaves the narrations of various female narrators from Haiti. The narrators or storyteller each have strong cultural ties to Haiti, and their narrations capture the hardships of their lives. The stories are written in dialect, which can be challenging for some readers. There are also some adult themes that may not be appropriate for a younger audience. The text is rich with symbolism, thematic meaning, and various literary devices. Can be taught as a whole novel or as individual short stories. ( )
  JessicaC35 | Nov 12, 2011 |
Krik? Krak!, a book of short stories about Haitian women, is my favorite of Edwidge Danticat's works. Aside from the first and middle stories, men are tangential to women's lives, being portrayed only as love objects, parental figures or feared oppressors. The stories show Haitians living lives filled with beauty, love, intelligence and fear, in an environment of the most severe poverty and oppression. I would recommend it to anyone as an introduction to Danticat. Then if they could stand the mother in the last story they could move on to Breath, Eyes and Memory where her personality is multiplied by 10. ( )
  Citizenjoyce | Apr 4, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Krik? Krak! Somwhere by the seacoast I feel a breath
of warm sea air and hear the laughter of children.
An old granny smokes her pipe,
surrounded by the village children . . .
"We tell the stories so that the young ones
will know what came before them.
They ask Krik? we say Krak!
Our stories are kept in our hearts."

--Sal Scalora,
"White Darkness/Black Dreamings"
Haiti: Feeding The Spirit
Dedication
First words
They say behind the mountains are more mountains.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 067976657X, Paperback)

When Haitians tell a story, they say "Krik?" and the eager listeners answer "Krak!" In Krik? Krak! In her second novel, Edwidge Danticat establishes herself as the latest heir to that narrative tradition with nine stories that encompass both the cruelties and the high ideals of Haitian life. They tell of women who continue loving behind prison walls and in the face of unfathomable loss; of a people who resist the brutality of their rulers through the powers of imagination. The result is a collection that outrages, saddens, and transports the reader with its sheer beauty.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:17:50 -0400)

When Haitians tell a story, they say "Krik?" and the eager listeners answer "Krak!" In Krik? Krak! In her second novel, Edwidge Danticat establishes herself as the latest heir to that narrative tradition with nine stories that encompass both the cruelties and the high ideals of Haitian life. They tell of women who continue loving behind prison walls and in the face of unfathomable loss; of a people who resist the brutality of their rulers through the powers of imagination. The result is a collection that outrages, saddens, and transports the reader with its sheer beauty.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
12 avail.
18 wanted
3 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.07)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 3
3 29
3.5 6
4 54
4.5 8
5 47

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,617,304 books! | Top bar: Always visible