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Alice by Christina Henry
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Alice

by Christina Henry

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Chronicles of Alice (1)

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5503027,281 (3.84)5
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» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
*Trigger Warning: Sexual Abuse*
This book frequently mentions and also hints at sexual assault.

........

The Chronicles of Alice is a series written by author Christina Henry. Book One, Alice was published in August 2015 and it seems like I’m only now catching up with this addictive series.


*Alice has spent ten years in a mental institution, slowly losing her mind.*

‘She was a broken thing and the New City did not like broken things. They liked the new and the whole.’

Almost as soon as I began reading, I felt a kinship with Alice. The description of her being ‘a broken thing’ really hit me at my core. From my point of view, diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, I always feel broken and I’m not sure if I will ever be able to fix myself. In this retelling, Alice became someone I could look to for relatable experiences, someone I could share my secret pain with until the very last page.


*Another quote that shook me at the start was- *

‘That was the trouble with not being right in the head. You couldn’t always tell if your eyes were telling the truth.’

This is so true. If your perception is altered for any reason, you may not see (whether literal or metaphorical) things that sit right beneath your nose. You may misunderstand a situation or someone’s intentions or may even read into something that isn’t there at all.

These initial relatable quotes really helped me to get into the story, which I consider a must read for anyone experiencing mental health issues as it helped me to feel connected to someone, despite them being a fictional character.

............

The review I wrote for Alice is quite long so if you'd like to read the full review, please visit my blog: https://www.daxwrites.com/chronicles-alice-book-review/
( )
  Daxmunro | Dec 31, 2018 |
As a reimagining of the classic Lewis Carroll story, I found it fairly interesting. The layers of anticipation that came with each character's naming was amusing, and watching Alice contend with unknown persons with well-known titles was actually rather fun.
Where the experience failed me was when I realized that without the "Alice Through the Looking Glass" trappings, the story itself wasn't as compelling. Had it not been billed as an Alice retelling, I might not have picked it up, let alone enjoyed it. ( )
  Ubiquitine | Nov 24, 2018 |
Alice is a young woman living in an insane asylum in a city divided.

She grew up in the New City, and at sixteen, she went with a friend, Dor, on an adventure into the Old City. The Old City is completely surrounded and contained by the New City, and contains all that the New City would like to deny. That includes dirt and poverty, but also crime and magic.

The adventure did not go well, and Alice is returned to the New City talking only of a tall man with long rabbit ears. Soon she is hospitalized, and is fed powders with every meal that dull her senses and awareness.

In time she starts talking to another patient through a mouse hole in the wall between their cells. That man's name is Hatcher, although it didn't used to be.

One of his few memories is of killing a lot of people with a hatchet.

Among their other topics of conversation, he tells her a terrifying tale of a creature he calls the Jabberwock. It's a creature of power and magic, and utterly destructive, and is currently imprisoned in the basement of the hospital they're in. He can feel it sometimes, when it wakes up.

And then one night, the hospital burns. Alice and Hatcher escape, but so does the Jabberwock.

Alice is plunged back into a nightmare she and Hatcher had both mostly forgotten.

Alice was raised in the comfort and safety of the New City. She's been nowhere except the hospital for ten years. Now she's out in the Old City, hunting the Rabbit and hoping to kill or contain the Jabberwock, along with a man who tells her he's an ax murderer.

What could possibly go wrong?

This is a really impressive reworking of the Lewis Carroll's Alice stories, and a lot darker than I normally like. But Alice and Hatcher, and the people they encounter, including the Rabbit, the Walrus, the Caterpillar, and Cheshire, are interesting, complicated, compelling characters. I might not go on to read the next book in the sequence, but I don't at all regret reading, or rather listening to, this one.

Recommended.

I bought this audiobook. ( )
  LisCarey | Sep 19, 2018 |
On the strength of Lost Boy, and because Lewis Carroll's Alice books have always been dear to me, I picked up Christina Henry's Alice this week. I knew it would be dark, but I had no idea it would be SO dark. Alice is easily one of the creepiest books I've ever read. Henry is frighteningly good at giving her readers a good, long look at the horrors human beings are capable of visiting on each other, with the result that reading her work is more like reading true crime books about serial killers rather than fantasies.

I can't honestly say I enjoyed Alice, it's far too gruesome to be enjoyable, far too ugly in what it shows us about life, and yet I was invested in it; I had to finish. I had to know that something would be right in the end, something, no matter how small.

The characters are all damaged, physically, emotionally, mentally. They do horrible things. They have to live with those horrible things, and how they manage is why some are heroes and others are villains. There's a whole lot of pain in this book. I can't say, "Oh yeah, you must read this!" because I know there are readers who can't tolerate all that pain. If you want light-hearted fairy tales, if you want Carroll's high silliness unmarked by darkness, steer clear of this book.

In all honesty, I'm not sure I'll read the next one in the series. Right now, within hours of finishing Alice, I feel as if I never want to enter that world again. I suppose it's possible that the allure of all that darkness -- and it can be alluring -- may catch me up again. But right now all I want is an uncomplicated story, and a dish of ice cream. ( )
  Tracy_Rowan | Jun 7, 2018 |


Alice is an amazing, dark twist on an original classic that I've loved since I first laid eyes on it. Upon first reading the summary, I immediately began thinking of two games American McGee's Alice and Alice: Madness Returns along with the newer game, Alice is Dead, however, for anyone else thinking this, get the thought out of your head this instant. I'm not saying thinking that is going to kill your expectations, but this book is nothing like either of those games, and slightly more disturbing.

As a reader who grew up loving the works of the twisted Edgar Allan Poe, I find comfort and love for the dark and gruesome tales. Ms. Henry does a wonderful job taking a much loved classic and turning it into a nightmare with fluid details, capturing scenes, and a thrilling plot. The spin on the characters was perfectly executed for each; Hatcher, Cheshire, The Rabbit, The Walrus -- all amazing with their own type of madness... (more via website) ( )
  VesperDreams | May 20, 2018 |
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Christina Henryprimary authorall editionscalculated
Sterlin, JennyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
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For Danielle Stockley, because you believed in Maddy and Alice and me
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If she moved her head all the way up against the wall and tilted it to the left she could just see the edge of the moon through the bars.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
A mind-bending new novel inspired by the twisted and wondrous works of Lewis Carroll...

In a warren of crumbling buildings and desperate people called the Old City, there stands a hospital with cinderblock walls which echo the screams of the poor souls inside.

In the hospital, there is a woman. Her hair, once blond, hangs in tangles down her back. She doesn’t remember why she’s in such a terrible place. Just a tea party long ago, and long ears, and blood…

Then, one night, a fire at the hospital gives the woman a chance to escape, tumbling out of the hole that imprisoned her, leaving her free to uncover the truth about what happened to her all those years ago.

Only something else has escaped with her. Something dark. Something powerful.

And to find the truth, she will have to track this beast to the very heart of the Old City, where the rabbit waits for his Alice.
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"A mind-bending new novel inspired by the twisted and wondrous works of Lewis Carroll...In a warren of crumbling buildings and desperate people called the Old City, there stands a hospital with cinderblock walls which echo the screams of the poor souls inside. In the hospital, there is a woman. Her hair, once blond, hangs in tangles down her back. She doesn't remember why she's in such a terrible place. Just a tea party long ago, and long ears, and blood... Then, one night, a fire at the hospital gives the woman a chance to escape, tumbling out of the hole that imprisoned her, leaving her free to uncover the truth about what happened to her all those years ago. Only something else has escaped with her. Something dark. Something powerful. And to find the truth, she will have to track this beast to the very heart of the Old City, where the rabbit waits for his Alice"--… (more)

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