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The Borden Murders: Lizzie Borden and the…
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The Borden Murders: Lizzie Borden and the Trial of the Century

by Sarah Miller

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Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
I've read a fair number of books on the Borden murders, and am always looking for "the one" that's going to offer the most credible explanation of who committed the crimes, and how, and why. Unfortunately, this book doesn't lean one way or the other, and also introduces a few oddities (the hank of hair found near Abby Borden's body, a "club" ditto, and a hatchet purportedly found on the roof of a nearby building) but never follows up on the significance of those items.

There are better books on the Borden case out there. ( )
  mrsmig | Jan 19, 2018 |
Review to come. ( )
  majesdane | Aug 8, 2017 |
I've been interested in the story of Lizzie Borden since seeing a made for television movie about her years ago. Though a fan of detective fiction, and sometimes crime novels, I found this book somewhat tedious. Perhaps it was the simplistic style, perhaps because it was the repetition of events and descriptions that occurred frequently throughout the book. Middle school age readers might find this narrative more to their liking.

This book could be used in a New England history class, a forensics class, or in an assignment related to mysteries and crimes. ( )
  mcintorino | Jan 9, 2017 |
This is a great book for those who love the true-crime genre. I enjoyed how it was a light, easy to read book that kept me interested. Some parts were more boring than others, like the parts where the family's background is being described. This story made me want to look into this famous crime even more. It was also refreshing to see that the author wrote with no bias and just presented the facts. The author's main goal was to present both sides of the story to an incredibly infamous murder case. ( )
  mdinar2 | Oct 27, 2016 |
Sarah Miller presents the facts as she finds them in primary documents to detail Lizzie Borden’s story.

On August 4, 1892, Lizzie Borden was home with a maid. It seemed a quiet morning. It was only when her father was discovered hacked to death that Lizzie’s life completely changed. Shortly thereafter, Lizzie’s step-mother was found stabbed to death upstairs. Where was Lizzie? How could anyone have snuck in, killed two people so brutally, and then escaped without being heard. They had to have been murdered by someone in the house--that person has to be Lizzie.

There’s a famous rhyme that kids have said since this time:
Lizzie Borden took an axe,
Gave her mother forty whacks.
When she saw what she had done.
She gave her father forty-one.

The author, Sarah Miller, begins with this children’s rhyme and proceeds to tell Lizzie’s story using court documents, newspapers, and personal accounts. Her sister and many friends supported her throughout the trial, completely believing she was incapable of such savage murder. The police can see no one else to consider. Because they have money, they are able to hire a competent attorney.

By the end of the book, you can decide if you think Lizzie was innocent or guilty. The evidence is intriguing. No matter what you think, a woman spent her life hearing a terrible rhyme and being suspected of murder. It must have been a tiring and lonely existence. ( )
  acargile | Jul 13, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
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Book description
In a compelling, linear narrative, Miller takes readers along as she investigates a brutal crime: the August 4, 1892, murders of wealthy and prominent Andrew and Abby Borden. The accused? Mild-mannered and highly respected Lizzie Borden, daughter of Andrew and stepdaughter of Abby. Most of what is known about Lizzie's arrest and subsequent trial (and acquittal) comes from sensationalized newspaper reports; as Miller sorts fact from fiction, and as a legal battle gets under way, a gripping portrait of a woman and a town emerges. With inserts featuring period photos and newspaper clippings--and, yes, images from the murder scene--readers will devour this nonfiction book that reads like fiction.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0553498088, Hardcover)

Here’s middle-grade nonfiction that reads like a thriller. With murder, court battles, and sensational newspaper headlines, the story of Lizzie Borden is compulsively readable and perfect for the Common Core.
 
Lizzie Borden took an axe, gave her mother forty whacks. When she saw what she had done, she gave her father forty-one.
 
In a compelling, linear narrative, Miller takes readers along as she investigates a brutal crime: the August 4, 1892, murders of wealthy and prominent Andrew and Abby Borden. The accused? Mild-mannered and highly respected Lizzie Borden, daughter of Andrew and stepdaughter of Abby. Most of what is known about Lizzie’s arrest and subsequent trial (and acquittal) comes from sensationalized newspaper reports; as Miller sorts fact from fiction, and as a legal battle gets under way, a gripping portrait of a woman and a town emerges.
 
With inserts featuring period photos and newspaper clippings—and, yes, images from the murder scene—readers will devour this nonfiction book that reads like fiction.

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 23 Aug 2015 06:32:44 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Examines the Borden murders, using newspaper articles to recreate the events and the trial and acquittal of Lizzie Borden and exploring Lizzie's story to theorize on what may have happened.

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Sarah Miller is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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