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Night Music: Nocturnes Volume 2 by John…
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John Connelly's first collection of short stories (Nocturnes) was a great book with many good stories. This book is equally good if not better. It contains both short stories and two longer novellas.

The Caxton Private Lending Library and Book Depository, one of the novellas is without a doubt my favorite story in the book. It's about a man that discovers that characters from books end up in The Caxton Private Lending Library and Book Depository for real as soon as the author has died. But only those really famous characters like Sherlock Holmes, Anna Karenina, and Dracula, etc. It was such a tremendous story and the “library” return later on in the book in one of the shorter stories.

There is no Charlie Parker short story within this collection as it was in the last collection, but I did not mind because the stories are so good and so well written that even those that the subject wasn't really my cup of tea got at least 3-star rating.

4.5 stars

I received this copy from Atria/Emily Bestler Books through Edelweiss in return for an honest review! Thank you! ( )
  MaraBlaise | Dec 10, 2017 |
With his delicate and slightly chilling prose, John Connolly is a writer of distinction, best known for his beyond-excellent Charlie Parker series where excitement, melancholy and belly laughs make for a thrilling read.

That Connolly is also a dab hand at the short story is proved by this, his second volume of tales that are magical, unsettling, supernatural and funny – but never quite horrifying.

Take Lazarus whom, although raised from the dead by Jesus, is not really alive; or the Caxton Private Lending Library and Book Depository where famous literary characters go when their original creator dies – imagine what happens when the resurrected Sherlock Holmes and Moriarty meet?

And then there is the little Irish girl who can perform miracles: her parents are delighted to welcome Vatican investigators - even if they do arrive a day early - never verifying that these are priests, not something more sinister.

A superb collection for readers who prefer having their imaginations stimulated rather than their spines tingled. ( )
1 vote adpaton | Dec 31, 2015 |
Night Music: Nocturnes, Vol. 2 is the second story collection by author John Connolly. Connolly is one of my favourite writers and this collection is a good example of why. The range and diversity of these stories guarantees that there is a little something something for anyone with a love of all things supernatural from the creepy horror of “Razorshins” to the sweet sadness of “A Haunting”. It contains 12 stories and novellas and, as in any collection of stories, I Iiked some better than others. My favourite is the novella “The Caxton Lending Library & Book Depository”. In this wonderfully imaginative tale, after authors die, their characters, at least those that have become part of our collective consciousness like Anna Karenina or Dracula, move into a hidden library in the British countryside. This august establishment plays a role in another story, “Holmes on the Range” which is a rather quirky tale about the possible consequences of an author killing off a beloved character and later bringing him back to life. The book ends with a fascinating and often laugh-out-loud essay titled “I Live Here” in which Connolly discusses the writers and books that influenced his own writing… among other things including his definitely not-stalking of Stephen King.

If you’re a fan of the supernatural or just good writing and are looking for something that you can read at your leisure at this busy time of year, this may be the perfect solution although, warning, you may find yourself so engrossed in this collection you may forget to put it down to get back to those other things. ( )
  lostinalibrary | Dec 28, 2015 |
I was quite familiar with award-winning author John Connolly’s Charlie Parker thriller series so I’m not sure why I was surprised that he ventured into the realm of the supernatural with his Night Music Nocturnes anthologies. My first clue that I was missing something probably should have been that he had previously won the Bram Stoker award. Doh. When I read the publisher’s description for Night Music Nocturnes, Volume 2, I thought it might just be perfect for some scary Halloween reading. And since it’s comprised of short stories and a couple of novellas, I could read it at a wussy rate instead of a deep dive that would have me checking for the dreaded closet monsters again. If you’re looking for some quick eerie reads with an award-winning lengthy novella or two thrown in, should this one be on your TBR pile? Find out at http://popcornreads.com/?p=8602 ( )
  PopcornReads | Oct 28, 2015 |
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Offers a collection of thirteen short fiction tales of horror and the supernatural.

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