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Moose by Max de Radigues
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This story is quietly brutal. The subject matter, bullying, was very serious and at the end, we're left contemplating whether Joe made the right choice of not. ( )
  justreign | Jul 25, 2017 |
This book was provided to me by the library, because the library is awesome.

Joe is a shy high school student who is relentlessly bullied and must find comfort in the natural world. Soon however, his story twists into a tale of power and fear complete with visual symbolism and beautiful cartooning. The morally ambiguous ending will keep you thinking long after you close the covers.

The story of Joe and all he goes through at the hands of his bully, Jason, is heartbreaking; not because of the way it’s written (though the writer did an excellent job), but because it so accurately describes day to day life for many kids. Schools and school buses can be places straight out of nightmares, and the author did a beautiful job of portraying that fact. When the reader discovers some of the why behind the bullying (circumstances completely outside of Joe’s control), the sense of injustice becomes even more palpable. There are adults in the story who try to reach out to Joe, but it’s clear that they don’t understand the depth of his torment, and the increasing danger that will result if he is honest. This graphic novel is a must read for any parent or other adult who works with children. The lengths Joe feels he has to go to in order to be free of his bully are drastic, tragic, and completely relatable to anyone who has been in his position. I recommend Moose to any 13 and older with the caveat that there are strong themes of violence (all kinds), but they are necessary to the message being delivered.
( )
  khaddox | Feb 6, 2017 |
A beautiful and sparsely drawn graphic novel about a young boy and his experiences being bullied in school (middle school/junior high). All I'll say is that it took a devastating turn at the end that I wasn't expecting. Quick, excellent read.

9/10

S: 1/21/15 - F: 1/21/16 (1 Days) ( )
  mahsdad | Feb 9, 2016 |
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Joe is a shy high school student who is relentlessly bullied, and must find comfort in the natural world. Soon however, the story twists into a tale of power and fear complete with visual symbolism and beautiful cartooning. The morally ambiguous ending will keep you thinking long after you close the covers.… (more)

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