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Glass Sword (Red Queen) by Victoria Aveyard
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Glass Sword (Red Queen) (edition 2018)

by Victoria Aveyard (Author)

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1,567777,076 (3.72)23
Member:mbellomo83
Title:Glass Sword (Red Queen)
Authors:Victoria Aveyard (Author)
Info:HarperTeen (2018), Edition: Reprint, 464 pages
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Glass Sword by Victoria Aveyard

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Showing 1-5 of 76 (next | show all)
It's very good. The character development was amazing and the tension could be felt even though you were just reading. You could visualize the scenery through the authors words. ( )
  regi_ | Apr 30, 2019 |
Glass Sword is a tragedy. Any faith that I had in Aveyard as an author died in Glass Sword.

Back in Red Queen, I had issues with the writing:
Mare’s narration tended to be the cheating kind. First person point of view is very limited to only that single character’s head. Mare can’t possibly know the motivations behind characters’ decisions or actions without their telling her what they are. Mare knows without ever asking. The Maven twist came along and I settled back into enjoying the story. Aveyard used Mare’s confidence in reading people against her. Mare will learn from this experience and ask people what they are thinking and feeling more often, right?

Nope.

In Glass Sword, Mare continues to read people’s minds and be generally correct with no real fall out when she is wrong. It is much easier to create an emotionally intelligent character that can read people as easily as if the author is reading them for them (aka cheating) than it is to have that same character be flawed and grow from mistakes.

The world building is flimsy for such a grand scale story. For instance, the fact that Farley charged Mare an insane amount of money to escape conscription rankled. I know that people who cross the American border from Mexico lose a lot in the journey. I can understand where Aveyard may be coming from with this. However, it was set up as though no one has ever escaped conscription before let alone asked for help in escaping. It stuck in my head. Jewish babies were smuggled out of Nazi Germany ghettos. Why isn’t there a system in place for the Red population? It’s eventually revealed that there are chunks of Reds living somewhat free from Silver rule within Norta. It was a nice surprise.

This world building issue, however, continues into Glass Sword. Many other reviewers have spoken about this. We’re taken to different cities, but we don’t take the time to know them. Mare is brooding for the entire novel and can’t stand to give anyone her attention or trust. That included the newbloods that they spend most of the novel searching for and the towns that they visit. Yes, they may have found less newbloods if the characters took their time exploring the cities, and the suffering people within, but the story would have been significantly more satisfying.

Characterization is also thin. No one in Red Queen seemed to have any interests or hobbies. What do they do outside of class? What do the kids in the royal court think about besides the crown? Cal got slightly more as the romantic lead. He builds motorcycles and reads a lot of books on war. Why not take the time to get to know Walsh even if she’s now lower in station than Mare? Or show Evangeline have an emotional range past rage or jealousy? What does Maven’s bedroom look like?

And so on in Glass Sword. I mentioned before that Mare spent the novel brooding. Even though she can read everyone’s minds through slight body movements alone, she doesn’t actually know anything about any of the characters. She gets Shade back and immediately pushes him away. What was he doing when he was in the Choke? Not a clue. It eventually becomes a small joke amongst the characters. Mare didn’t notice something because she too busy being self-involved? LOL.

It’s not a cute look, Aveyard. Change the point of views or change Mare. Instead, we get neither, and the story drags and drags yet manages not to give any real new information.

I could go on for a while, but this review is long enough. ( )
  marcosburlybiceps | Mar 22, 2019 |
I waffled while reading this book. I went from voracious reading to when is it going to end. Parts had me captivated, but others were meh. I read this as a group read (albeit late) and because I had read the first one. I am going to read the next only because of the cliff hangar at the end of this story. I am not sure if i like or loathe the character of Mare. She can be strong and altruistic one minute, and sniveling the next. Cal is pretty much the same. I think Kilorn is my favourite character in this book. He is strong, loyal and pretty much the only one that understands Mare. As they find and "save" more and more New Bloods, we begin to see what some of the special powers they possess are. Some of the allies in this book are pretty nasty and I am not sure if I would even call them allies at some points. That part is interesting. The ending leaves me wondering what is coming next. It was totally unexpected. ( )
  Carlathelibrarian | Feb 5, 2019 |
I struggled with this book and only got through half of it. While some of the side characters were interesting and I would have liked to learn more about them, the plot struggled. I had no sympathy for our protagonist at all. When I realized that I didn't really care what happened to her, I put the book down. Life is too short. ( )
  Velmeran | Jan 26, 2019 |
Goodbye Mare Barrow aka the Lightning Girl. It's been fun. But I don't think I can read books three, four or five. Don't get me wrong. The writing is excellent. But the story seems to repeat itself. Go to battle, lose, get captured and taken prisoner. Only to escape and do it all over again. Instead of keeping her alive, why not kill her and be done with it. Oh wait, that would end the story. 3 of 5 stars for me. ( )
  stevealtier | Jan 23, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 76 (next | show all)
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To my grandparents, here and there.  You were always home.
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I flinch.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062310666, Hardcover)

If there's one thing Mare Barrow knows, it's that she's different.

Mare Barrow's blood is red—the color of common folk—but her Silver ability, the power to control lightning, has turned her into a weapon that the royal court tries to control.

The crown calls her an impossibility, a fake, but as she makes her escape from Maven, the prince—the friend—who betrayed her, Mare uncovers something startling: She is not the only one of her kind.

Pursued by Maven, now a vindictive king, Mare sets out to find and recruit other Red-and-Silver fighters to join in the struggle against her oppressors.

But Mare finds herself on a deadly path, at risk of becoming exactly the kind of monster she is trying to defeat.

Will she shatter under the weight of the lives that are the cost of rebellion? Or have treachery and betrayal hardened her forever?

The electrifying next installment in the Red Queen series escalates the struggle between the growing rebel army and the blood-segregated world they've always known—and pits Mare against the darkness that has grown in her soul.

(retrieved from Amazon Sat, 11 Jul 2015 00:58:18 -0400)

The electrifying next installment in the Red Queen series escalates the struggle between the growing rebel army and the blood-segregated world they've always known -- and pits Mare against the darkness that has grown in her soul. Mare Barrow's blood is red -- the color of common folk -- but her Silver ability, the power to control lightning, has turned her into a weapon that the royal court tries to control. The crown calls her an impossibility, a fake, but as she makes her escape from Maven, the prince -- the friend -- who betrayed her, Mare uncovers something startling: she is not the only one of her kind. Pursued by Maven, now a vindictive king, Mare sets out to find and recruit other Red-and-Silver fighters to join in the struggle against her oppressors. But Mare finds herself on a deadly path, at risk of becoming exactly the kind of monster she is trying to defeat.Will she shatter under the weight of the lives that are the cost of rebellion? Or have treachery and betrayal hardened her forever?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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