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The Prophetess: Deborah's Story…
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The Prophetess: Deborah's Story (Daughters of the Promised Land)

by Jill Eileen Smith

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I never know whether I'll like a book written about a Biblical person. Once I started I didn't need any convincing. I loved it. Jill Eileen Smith created a beautiful story around what the Scripture reveals about Deborah. It's engaging and compelling. She included suspense, romance, and faith. Her characters that surround Deborah are strong and add to the harmony of the storyline. The prophet's life will always stand out to me whenever I encounter her again in the Bible.

I highly recommend The Prophetess: Deborah's Story by Jill Eileen Smith. I received a copy of this book by Net Galley and the author for my honest review. I thank them for this delightful opportunity.
( )
  sh2rose | Sep 6, 2016 |
The Prophetess is book 2 in the Daughters of the Promised Land written by Jill Eileen Smith. This is a Biblical fiction book of Deborah based on Judges 4:1-5.

Deborah is Lappidoth’s wife, and mother of Lavi, Elior and Tayla. Lappidoth is a Levite who is also a scribe, writing copies of the law and writing letters for the elders. He teaches Deborah how to read and write so she can also do this. Deborah learns the law and spend her time sitting at the city gate as a Judge answering people’s questions regarding the law.

Deborah also receives visions from God. As the country is being terrorized by Sisera who travels around killing people and taking the girls, God reveals to her that this will not end until everyone stops worshiping idols.

The story also introduces us to Deborah’s extended family as well as Barak, a man whose wife was murdered by Sisera. Deborah’s daughter, Tayla, is interested in Barak and would like to be his wife, but he rejects her.

I enjoy reading stories of women in the Bible and this story is really good. I like how the author brings the customs of the time into the story . I appreciate the research the author has done to bring this story to life. I also appreciate that even though this is a series, the book is a stand alone story.

I was gifted this book from Baker Publishing Group for an honest review.
  eccl | Apr 17, 2016 |
The Prophetess, by Jill Eileen Smith, takes Judges 4 and 5 and brings the story of Deborah and Barack to life in living color. Well-researched, true to Jewish culture and history, we are fearfully caught up in the lives of Deborah and her family, starting with her marriage and proceeding all the way through Israel's victory over Canaan.

This is more than a story of Deborah, though. It also is a novel of backslidden,desperate Israel, looking for a rescuer from cruel oppressors. It is a tale of Barack and his background and growth as an Israelite leader. We even are treated to an inside view of Jael and Heber's family. While we don't know exactly how history occurred, Smith stays true to Scripture while weaving a dazzling novel of fear, faith, love, uncertainty, and forgiveness.

I loved that while the "big" sins were addressed and dealt with, several characters realize that pleasing God is keeping ALL the commandments, something we humans cannot do. These people urged their compatriots to forgive the major, obvious sins, pointing out that we all displease God and need His amazing grace!

Jill Eileen Smith has created a book sure to be a bestseller! I gratefully received a copy of this book from Revell Reads and Connywithay. ( )
  Becky_L | Mar 28, 2016 |
The Prophetess is the second in the “Daughters of the Promised Land” series by one of my favorite authors, Jill Eileen Smith. It follows the outstanding book The Crimson Cord, which brought the Biblical harlot-turned-heroine Rahab to life.
In The Prophetess, Smith once again has vividly painted a plausible back story for a Biblical woman we know little about, except – in this case – what we can glean from Judges 4 and 5. She weaves a tale that takes us back in time to gain a sense for what life may have been like for the wife of Lappidoth and respected judge over Israel.
The story begins in 1126 B.C., when Deborah, at the age of just 15, receives a message from God. We then fast-forward a decade to find Deborah married with two sons and another baby on the way. She begins to receive more messages from God and discerns that the reason He is allowing her people to suffer at the hand of the Canaanites is that people are worshipping other gods.
Though clearly a woman who is called by the Almighty, the strong-willed Deborah deals with human struggles that make her very relatable. These include, among others, tension both in her marriage and in her relationship with her daughter.
The story is set in an extremely challenging time in Israeli history, but Smith was clearly up to the challenge of writing about it. This is a wonderful addition to her newest book series, and I can’t wait to meet the next Promised Land daughter!
I received this book from the author for my honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” ( )
  kad1964 | Mar 12, 2016 |
Having studied and taught the book of Judges, I was very familiar with the story of Deborah before reading Jill Eileen Smith’s novel, The Prophetess. But what an eye and mind opener this novel is! Following closely the Biblical narrative, it brings the story of Israel’s oppression and triumph to life. Jill did a great job of making me think about the characters as real people. She also focused on the God of Israel — both just and merciful as He deals with his disobedient children. A story from ancient days, Jill makes her readers think about its relevance in today’s culture. This suspenseful book gets a highly recommended read from me!

The days of Deborah are filled with fear as the people of Israel hide from the terror that is Sisera. As the Canannite king’s man, Sisera kills, kidnaps and tortures God’s people. The people cry out to God, but He remains silent as some still seek other gods. Deborah is the judge and prophetess who calls the people to repentance and leads them in victory against their oppressors.

As I stated above, the Biblical characters of Deborah, Barak, Lappidoth and Jael became very real to me. Without adding to the meaning of scripture, Jill fleshes them out by exploring the what-ifs of their lives. She also adds a few fictional characters who compliment the story without jeopardizing God’s truth. I love Biblical fiction for this very thing, because it puts me in the characters’ lives. How would I have reacted to their experiences? Idol worship led to Israel’s troubles, and it is easy to say we would never act that way. But Jill shows how insidious disobedience is and the great chasm it causes between God and His people. In the course of the book, Deborah asks God why it has taken 20 years for him to respond to the people’s prayers. This is what she learns:

They had left Adonai and true worship of Him for the gods of these nations they now battled to overcome. This was not a war of peoples but of the rights of gods to rule. Whose god held the power of life and death? Whose god could destroy both soul and body in Hades? Asherah and Baal? Or Adonai Elohim, the Lord God Almighty?

One of the most interesting what-ifs explored is the relationship between Deborah and Lappidoth. In a world where women had few if any rights, Deborah spoke for God. What kind of man would her husband have been? I think Jill does an excellent job of creating a character mentioned only briefly in scripture.

So if you are looking for a book that will stretch your imagination, fill you with suspense and make you turn to scripture, then check out The Prophetess.

Highly recommended.

Audience: older teens to adults.

Great for book clubs.

(Thanks to the author for a review copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.) ( )
  vintagebeckie | Mar 9, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0800720350, Paperback)

Outspoken and fearless, Deborah has faith in God but struggles to see the potential her own life holds. As an Israelite woman, she'll marry, have a family, and seek to teach her children about Adonai--and those tasks seem to be more than enough to occupy her time. But God has another plan for her. Israel has been under the near constant terror of Canaan's armies for twenty years, and now God has called Deborah to deliver her people from this oppression. Will her family understand? Will her people even believe God's calling on her life? And can the menace of Canaan be stopped?

With her trademark impeccable research and her imaginative storytelling, Jill Eileen Smith brings to life the story of Israel's most powerful woman in a novel that is both intriguing and inspiring.

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 30 Aug 2015 04:34:25 -0400)

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