HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Lost Codex by Alan Jacobson
Loading...

The Lost Codex

by Alan Jacobson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
309367,255 (3.3)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Disappointing! Sorry. I tried. Just could not make it through this. I won't bore you with the plot, it's been covered by many other reviewers. Predictable formula. Poor dialog. Typical alphabet-soup of agencies, each represented by a hero character. Snipers picked off from multi-story buildings with a single shot from an off hand shot by an officer using a handgun? With a scope that he just happened to have in his pocket, and just snapped onto said handgun, with perfect accuracy? Give me a break! Been done before, much better by other authors. ( )
  1Randal | May 22, 2016 |
I find that I simply cannot read these Karen Vail books and I gave up at about 10%. Terrible dialogue, no attention paid to military or police protocols. No realism. Sorry.

I received a review copy of "The Lost Codex" by Alan Jacobson (Open Road) through NetGalley.com. ( )
  Dokfintong | Apr 29, 2016 |
The Lost Codex by Alan Jacobson is a highly recommended international political thriller.

The novel opens decades earlier with the unearthing of a new Dead Sea Scroll that is hinted at being world-religion-changing, the action switches to the present day and terrorists are targeting Washington. D.C.. After a bombing (and it's more complicated than that) members of the Operations support Intelligence Group (OPSIG) are called into action. The group is a team of uniquely trained covert operatives and includes FBI profiler Karen Vail (featured in another series by Jacobson), Special Forces veteran Hector DeSantos, and FBI terrorism expert Aaron Uziel.

The team discovers that there is a terrorist cell making personal vest bombs for suicide bombers. As they uncover and break up the cell in D.C., they discover more information that points to a host of other international terrorist plots that somehow tie into the ancient scrolls, two of which have gone missing. The team is asked to work with former Palestinian Mahmoud El-Fahad of the CIA, but they aren't sure they can trust him. Their search takes them to New York, London, Paris, and Tel Aviv.

The Lost Codex is really more of a political thriller with terrorists rather than a concentrated focus on the information in the ancient codex. Setting that aside, it is an outstanding tactical thriller with plenty of action. I need to warn readers that it starts out fast and then slows down as Jacobson needs to impart a whole lot of background information before moving on to the action. This information is essential to the story and covers terrorist activity. (Jacobson did his research so much of the background information he provides is true.)

Jacobson is a seasoned writer so he knows how to tell a story while keeping the plot moving and the reader's interest high. I appreciate the research he did to realistically cover terrorist activity. The Lost Codex is a great stuck-over-night-at-the-airport book. The action should keep you awake - once you get past the slow down due to the background information (get coffee here). Then there is nonstop action and enough tension to entertain you for hours. Even though this is part of a series, it works as a stand-alone novel.

Disclosure: My Kindle edition was courtesy of Open Road Integrated Media for review purposes.
( )
  SheTreadsSoftly | Mar 21, 2016 |
August 6, 1953
The West Bank, Jordan
An Israeli member of the Mossad is serving undercover as a translator on a Catholic archaeological dig in Bedouin territory near the Dead Sea. An ancient scroll is discovered that portends to change religious history. And it disappears.

I snap to attention thinking, "This Prologue is powerful!

Flashing forward in time, familiar characters from earlier Jacobson's works are all brought back together for a Black Ops mission so secret even they weren't told about it.
• FBI profiler Karen Vail
• DOD covert operative Hector Santos
• FBI terrorism expert Aaron “Uzi” Uziel

A new character, Mahmoud El-Fahad, a Palestinian CIA Operative, is added to the team providing internal drama. With real-life flareups in the Middle East, this novel has all the elements to capture the attention of the reader and educate about the disparate issues complicating a peace treaty between Israel and Palestine.
Additionally, the mysterious Codex is a tantalizing tease. Ever present is a sense that the missing Codex has a significant role to play in the Black Ops Mission.

Unfortunately the book doesn't pull these threads together smoothly. The alphabet soup common to the military and intelligence agencies is overpowering to the uninitiated reader. The promise of learning that world religions could be profoundly affected by some ancient document hangs in the air with little or no reference for over half of the book. When Uzi and El-Fahad provide background on their cultures right in the middle of some interview or violent scene, it felt like the characters paused, faced the reader and gave a scripted history lesson. It stopped the action and made me lose track of what was happening in the story.

FBI profiler Karen Vail's ridiculous mental asides appearing all through the book felt weird and made her seem an unlikely member of a black ops team. It diminished the seriousness of her professional work. Actually she seemed rather unnecessary to tell the truth.

The Lost Codex (the Aleppo Codex) remained lost through most of the book. Now and again a thimbleful of text referred to it. I kept waiting for the Team Black to eventually lead to the Aleppo Code and reveal what the scroll said that would change the world. Instead the story seemed to head in all directions that had me wondering if all Black Ops teams and their Superiors are as unmoored as this group. It might have been a better book to have just focused on the terrorists and the Middle East.

When, almost as an aside, the Codex is found and the deep secret is revealed, it felt anti-climatic. The secret had the potential to rock the world but suddenly after those fugitive chases, bombings, intrigue, murder and mayhem, the Codex story just seems to lose air and quietly lose relevance altogether.

The Aleppo Codex is real and I was inspired by this book to find out more about it. There was a great article in the 7/29/2012 issue of New York Times Magazine if you are interested.

I get really wrapped up in my reviews; I take them very seriously so the bottom line is I struggled to finish this book. It was not a bad book by any stretch of the imagination just not top drawer. There were entertaining and captivating moments. The discussions on the history of the Middle East conflict were worth reading the book. ( )
  Itzey | Jan 23, 2016 |
Sorry. I tried. Just could not make it through this. I won't bore you with the plot, it's been covered by many other reviewers. Predictable formula. Poor dialog. Typical alphabet-soup of agencies, each represented by a hero character. Snipers picked off from multi-story buildings with a single shot from an off hand shot by an officer using a handgun? With a scope that he just happened to have in his pocket, and just snapped onto said handgun, with perfect accuracy? Give me a break! Been done before, much better by other authors. ( )
  1Randal | Oct 21, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

In 930 CE, a revered group of scholars penned the first sanctioned Bible, planting the seed from which other major religions would grow. In 1953, half the manuscript went missing while being transported from Syria. Around the same time, in the foothills of the Dead Sea, an ancient scroll was discovered--and promptly stolen. Six decades later, both parchments stand at the heart of a geopolitical battle between foreign governments and radical extremists, threatening the lives of millions.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.3)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 125,571,194 books! | Top bar: Always visible