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The Rosetta Man by Claire McCague
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The Rosetta Man

by Claire McCague

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Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Squirrely

Everything that the other reviewers say here is true. The book has a lot of characters and a lot of changes of location, some of which are unneeded for the plot but included solely, and this is not mentioned in other reviews I read, the changes in location allow us to watch more animals watch Estlin.

Estlin Hume has a difficult skill – animals, especially squirrels, adore him. More than pheromone attraction, Estlin actually understands animals and they love him for it. To the point that they invade (and trash) his house to be near him. This makes Estlin a difficult tenant and decades of evictions and relationships interrupted by critters have led him to a solitary life in an isolated cabin in rural Canada. Except sometimes biologists wrestling with thorny problems hire him – but they don't usually send military jets to pick him up.

Ms McCague lets Estlin's skill drive the plot and so poor Estlin is dragged around the Pacific by various political factions so that we may delight in the strange antics of the animals that follow him. I liked it loads.

Yes, the ending is abrupt and could have done with some better editing (and certainly a better title), but Edge Science Fiction doesn't work that way. Bury your annoyance with them and enjoy the book and the follow-on whenever that appears.

I received a review copy of "The Rosetta Man" by Claire McCague (Edge) through Librarything.com. ( )
  Dokfintong | Mar 17, 2018 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This is a placeholder for a review of The Rosetta Man, by Claire McCague. Please note that it should not be considered a finished review until I have awarded it a star rating.
  Wordwizardw | Oct 30, 2017 |
I liked this book a lot. Reminded me a little of Neal Stephenson. I liked most of the characters, the complex ideas, and the unpredictable plot developments. I think calling it slapstick oversells the comedic element. I think it had a sometimes light tone to address some serious subjects. It has a large cast and jumps among them with a frequency that might make it hard to follow for some readers, but I found it entertaining and compelling, if a bit depressing in its probably conflict and control rather than cooperation and collaboration. Who can blame the cuttlefish for not trusting us? ( )
  quartzite | Jun 27, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This book was a slow start...largely due to cosmetic/grammatical/editorial issues. It took me nearly two years to get through teh book--but was able to pick up pace the further I got into the book.

Ms. McCague has an exceptional imagination and brilliant story to tell--but it could really benefit from some polishing. A lot of polishing. I had trouble keeping track of many of the characters and understanding their purpose.

With that being said, the underlying idea for the story is incredible (along the lines of 'Arrival'), and this could be a first rate book with a rewrite.

Despite my awe for her imagination, I really can't recommend this book in its current form. ( )
1 vote editfish | May 20, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I received this book in exchange for an HONEST review. Please keep in mind that this is my opinion...you may disagree.

I am sorry. I just had to get that out there before I continued...I will try to explain my low rating WITHOUT giving away much/any of the story.
I am sorry that I just could not like, enjoy or get into this book at all. Most/many people read fiction to escape reality and get a little enjoyment out of an interesting story...and perhaps learn something along the way.

So, the whole escaping reality thing is good...to an extent. Let me explain.
Not everything in a story has to be true or even realistic (shocking isn't it) BUT it does have to fit the world/"environment" the book "lives in". Understand? Somethings just need to match otherwise reading it almost HURTS. I hope I'm explaining this correctly...

The problem with some fiction (like this book) is that there are too many "things" that just don't fit the rest. It's like making a puzzle and about 20 of the pieces are the wrong shape and have the wrong picture on them! Too many things did not fit (in my opinion).

I usually like alien books and I love satirical humor/fiction but I'm sorry Ms. McCague, I couldn't get down with this one. ( )
  Disco_grinch | Nov 1, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
When the scientific communities discover a Big Pulse and blue spikey alien animals show up in New Zealand, earth's governments converge with destroyers, scientists, missiles, spies, and politicians.Everyone wants the aliens and their technology for their own uses. Pandemonium ensues. The science gets a little techy, but the story is saved by the author's wonderfully quirky characters. Hume can 'talk to the animals' and develops a intimate mental relationship with the aliens who can change human's perceptions of reality. Harry, Bomami, Yidge - all great characters. The action moves swiftly if sometimes awkwardly as the narration moves between four or five groups of characters converging on the aliens. Are the aliens bad guys, good guys, scouts for an invasion? The denouement is very imaginative, though the cuttlefish angle did seem to come out of nowhere. Enjoyed it, science fiction with real science (I think) and a big helping of humor.
added by harrietcampbell | editLibrary Thing Early Reviews, harrietcampbell (Dec 13, 2015)
 
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Book description
Estlin Hume lives in Twin Butte, Alberta surrounded by a horde of affectionate squirrels. His involuntary squirrel-attracting talent leaves him evicted, expelled, fired and near penniless until two aliens arrive and adopt him as their translator. Yanked around the world at the center of the first contact crisis, Estlin finds his new employers incomprehensible. As he faces the ultimate language barrier, unsympathetic military forces converging in the South Pacific keep threatening to shoot the messenger. The question on everyone’s mind is why are the aliens here? But Estlin’s starting to think we’ll happily blow ourselves up in the process of finding that out.

"What makes The Rosetta Man stand-out? An unusually dense squirrel population for sci-fi. It’s light-hearted, accessible sci-fi with exotic present day settings and a pair of aliens who are focused on observing the revealing chaos their visit creates."
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Wanted: Translator for first contact. Immediate opening. Danger pay allowance. Estlin Hume lives in Twin Butte, Alberta surrounded by a horde of affectionate squirrels. His involuntary squirrel-attracting talent leaves him evicted, expelled, fired and near penniless until two aliens arrive and adopt him as their translator. Yanked around the world at the center of the first contact crisis, Estlin finds his new employers incomprehensible. As he faces the ultimate language barrier, unsympathetic military forces converging in the South Pacific keep threatening to kill the messenger. The question on everyone's mind is why are the aliens here? But Estlin's starting to think we'll happily blow ourselves up in the process of finding that out. "What makes The Rosetta Man stand-out? An unusually dense squirrel population for sci-fi. It's light-hearted, accessible sci-fi with exotic present day settings and a pair of aliens who are focused on observing the revealing chaos their visit creates." - Claire McCague, author "The Rosetta Man."… (more)

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