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The Death of Cancer: After Fifty Years on…
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The Death of Cancer: After Fifty Years on the Front Lines of Medicine, a…

by Vincent T DeVita

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A fascinating book that is part memoir and part history of the treatment of cancer from the 1940’s to the present. Devita was a medical student during the infancy of chemotherapy, and subsequently developed the first successful chemotherapy treatment for Hodgkin’s lymphoma. A fascinating story of someone in the trenches advocating for his patients and working tirelessly for cures. ( )
  St.CroixSue | May 18, 2016 |
Despite being a little dry reading in parts, this is an exceptional behind-the-scenes look at the War on Cancer by one who fought in its trenches. It is a book that looks at where we came from, where we are now and looks to a promising future if we simply fund and allow cancer researchers to do what they do best. This is a book for our legislators and those in the FDA to read and understand so they can assist in this effort, as well as a book for everyone concerned about cancer. I have gained tremendous insights into what cancer is and why there is hope for a better outcome every day. ( )
  Susan.Macura | Jan 31, 2016 |
As a young doctor working at the NIH in the early 1960s, Dr. DeVita came under the influence of Tom Frei and Jay Freireich, who were pushing the boundaries of multiple drug chemotherapy to fight cancer. Freireich's "never give up" approach burned deeply into DeVita's mind. DeVita applied the multiple drug approach used against leukemia to lymphoma, and achieved results that he described as "curing" cancer in many of his patients, to the distress of others in the oncology field. Always an optimist, DeVita was always on the lookout for approaches that would extend the lives of his patients, in the hope that the state of medicine would bring forth new treatment options. He was often correct, although the treatment options often were extremely difficult to access, due to regulatory barriers. DeVita rails against those barriers, especially the ones erected by the FDA, arguing that the rules for drugs for near-death cancer patients should differ from those applied to chronic diseases such as arthritis or diabetes. DeVita also attacks cancer surgeons and radiologists as being slow to pick up on the newest treatment options -- such as adjuvant chemotherapy in conjunction with breast cancer surgery -- and suggests that part of the motivation may have been financial. All cancer patients would want a doctor like DeVita fighting for them -- a doctor who knows which cancer centers have the most advanced treatment approaches for the specific cancers they have, and also is savvy enough to figure out how to get admission to the promising but not yet FDA-approved treatments. ( )
  pheinrich | Jan 30, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374135606, Hardcover)

The true story of the war on cancer from one of its generals

In The Death of Cancer, Dr. Vincent T. DeVita Jr.--former director of the National Cancer Institute, former physician-in-chief at Memorial Sloan Kettering, director of the Yale Cancer Center, former president of the American Cancer Society, and developer of the first successful chemotherapy treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, which first demonstrated that advanced cancers of a major organ system in adults could be cured by chemotherapy--provides a personal history of one of the greatest science stories of our time, covering our fight against cancer from a man who's seen it all.
But this is more than a history; it's also a work of advocacy. Despite declining mortality rates, DeVita argues, America's cancer patients are being shortchanged by timid doctors, misguided national agendas, and compromised bureaucracies. He gives readers an eye-opening look at the strengths and weaknesses of America's most prestigious cancer centers, showing how patients can use this information to their advantage. Though we're rapidly approaching total victory over cancer, he contends, we need to do more to synthesize our progress and help doctors put it into practice.
This is an ambitious book about a life-or-death subject, a vital entry into the cancer literature genre. With historical depth and authenticity, DeVita brings important information to readers about what cancer is, how best to fight it, and what we still have to learn.

(retrieved from Amazon Tue, 01 Sep 2015 11:03:12 -0400)

"The true story of the war on cancer from one of its generals. In The Death of Cancer, Dr. Vincent T. DeVita Jr.--former director of the National Cancer Institute, former physician-in-chief at Memorial Sloan Kettering, director of the Yale Cancer Center, former president of the American Cancer Society, and developer of the first successful chemotherapy treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, which first demonstrated that advanced cancers of a major organ system in adults could be cured by chemotherapy--provides a personal history of one of the greatest science stories of our time, covering our fight against cancer from a man who's seen it all. But this is more than a history; it's also a work of advocacy. Despite declining mortality rates, DeVita argues, America's cancer patients are being shortchanged by timid doctors, misguided national agendas, and compromised bureaucracies. He gives readers an eye-opening look at the strengths and weaknesses of America's most prestigious cancer centers, showing how patients can use this information to their advantage. Though we're rapidly approaching total victory over cancer, he contends, we need to do more to synthesize our progress and help doctors put it into practice. This is an ambitious book about a life-or-death subject, a vital entry into the cancer literature genre. With historical depth and authenticity, DeVita brings important information to readers about what cancer is, how best to fight it, and what we still have to learn"-- "A personal history of the war on cancer, told by the pioneering oncologist who developed the first successful chemotherapy treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma"--… (more)

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