HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who…
Loading...

Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her (2005)

by Melanie Rehak

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7624018,586 (3.65)87

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 87 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
An amazing tale of two women who created & "raised" Nancy Drew and then battled each other for the credit. Of course they should have joined forces in order to get more money out of the men who owned the publishing house. Not only an excellent history of our fave girl sleuth, but also of how girlhood was seen throughout the 20th century.

And yes, I'm that much of a sap that I teared up at the end.
  roniweb | May 30, 2019 |
When I discovered this book in a thrift shop I got that electric thrill of finding a treasure! If you're a Nancy Drew fan you will know what I mean. I'd read most of the mystery series as a girl, but had never even known about this book. Not only does the book describe how and why the "girl detective" was created, but goes into the history and growth of children's literature. Well-researched and fascinating, readers will enjoy seeing Nancy evolve from the 1930's to the 21st century. Photos, footnotes, an index and bibliography - a real find for fans. My only complaint - where is the list of book titles with dates in order of publication? ( )
  PhyllisReads | Apr 27, 2019 |
Really 3.5*s. Interesting history of the women's movement in America and how the Nancy Drew Mystery series changed with the times as well as the amazing women behind the stories. ( )
  KristinaSimon | Nov 24, 2018 |
By now it is probably reasonably common knowledge that “Carolyn Keene” was a pseudonym, one of many run by the Stratemeyer Syndicate, which specialized in writing juvenile series books. But who wrote under that pseudonym to give life to Nancy Drew, girl detective? Rehak’s book tells the story of Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, elder daughter of the Syndicate’s founder, Edward; and Mildred Wirt Benson, a journalist from Iowa, later resident of Ohio. Adams had the business of the Syndicate thrust upon her when her father died, and Benson was the writer who had been hired to write the first few Nancy Drew books. Both women ended up writing several books in the series, although they ended up developing divergent opinions on how “their” Nancy should speak and behave.

This was a fascinating book and made a great follow-up to Ghost of the Hardy Boys, the memoir of Leslie McFarlane, the first “Franklin W. Dixon”. This one gives you an in-depth look at the day-to-day running of the Syndicate and the challenges it faced as the 20th century progressed and young people’s tastes in literature changed. It also charts the progress of women’s rights and suffrage as embodied in the lives of Adams and Benson. I’d highly recommend this book for fans of Nancy Drew, fans of the Hardy Boys, and/or people who are interested in stories about the publishing industry. ( )
  rabbitprincess | May 18, 2018 |
I thought this was great-- exactly what it says it is, a history of Nancy Drew and the women (well, and the man who had a major hand in her development) who wrote her stories, shaping and re-shaping her look and style and character.

Heartily recommended to all Nancy Drew fans. ( )
  BraveNewBks | Mar 10, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Melanie Rehakprimary authorall editionscalculated
Jones, LarryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my family
First words
In September of 1929 children's book mogul Edward Stratemeyer sent one of his inimitable typed memos to Grosset & Dunlap, his longtime publisher, describing a new line of books he hoped they would launch the following spring.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 015603056X, Paperback)

A plucky “titian-haired” sleuth solved her first mystery in 1930. Eighty million books later, Nancy Drew has survived the Depression, World War II, and the sixties (when she was taken up with a vengeance by women’s libbers) to enter the pantheon of American girlhood. As beloved by girls today as she was by their grandmothers, Nancy Drew has both inspired and reflected the changes in her readers’ lives. Here, in a narrative with all the vivid energy and page-turning pace of Nancy’s adventures, Melanie Rehak solves an enduring literary mystery: Who created Nancy Drew? And how did she go from pulp heroine to icon? 
 
The brainchild of children’s book mogul Edward Stratemeyer, Nancy was brought to life by two women: Mildred Wirt Benson, a pioneering journalist from Iowa, and Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, a well-bred wife and mother who took over as CEO after her father died. In this century-spanning story, Rehak traces their roles—and Nancy’s—in forging the modern American woman.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:45 -0400)

A plucky "titian-haired" sleuth solved her first mystery in 1930. Eighty million books later, Nancy Drew has survived the Depression, World War II, and the sixties (when she was taken up with a vengeance by women's libbers) to enter the pantheon of American girlhood. As beloved by girls today as she was by their grandmothers, Nancy Drew has both inspired and reflected the changes in her readers' lives. Here, in a narrative with all the vivid energy and page-turning pace of Nancy's adventures, Melanie Rehak solves an enduring literary mystery: Who created Nancy Drew? And how did she go from pulp heroine to icon?    The brainchild of children's book mogul Edward Stratemeyer, Nancy was brought to life by two women: Mildred Wirt Benson, a pioneering journalist from Iowa, and Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, a well-bred wife and mother who took over as CEO after her father died. In this century-spanning story, Rehak traces their roles--and Nancy's--in forging the modern American woman.

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.65)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 11
2.5 2
3 43
3.5 10
4 66
4.5 5
5 21

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 137,325,868 books! | Top bar: Always visible