HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Her Majesty's Spymaster: Elizabeth I, Sir…
Loading...

Her Majesty's Spymaster: Elizabeth I, Sir Francis Walsingham, and the…

by Stephen Budiansky

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3711129,183 (3.47)25

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 25 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
I read Stephen's book on Dogs and thoroughly enjoyed it. He continues to educate here. Found out that Elizabeth wasn't very decisive, in fact she was a royal PITA. ;-) Mr. Secretary had his work cut out for him trying to find out everything that was going on in Spain and France to protect Elizabeth and England. If you enjoy history, read this book. ( )
  pnwbookgirl | Feb 7, 2016 |
Brevity is something author valued in this work. And yet when you arrive at the end you don't feel that the story suffered from lack of info.

Sir Walsingham was not the first spy master. But he was very significant in forging the case that led to the trial and execution of Mary Queen of Scots. He was adept at finding people to place in key positions that could give him information. Knowledge has always been power, a fact not lost on Sir Walsingham.

He was one person the Queen could depend on for an honest assessment as he was not a "yes" man. It was not unusual that he earned her displeasure for backing a course of action or view the Queen found unpleasant.

Overall fairly entertaining but did not keep me on the edge of the chair by any means. Good for someone that wants a look into the Elizabethan court from a different angle. ( )
  Chris_El | Mar 19, 2015 |
Elizabeth I, Sir Francis Walsingham and the birth of modern espionage.
Sir Francis Walsingham's official title was principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I, but in fact this pious, tight-lipped Puritan was England's first spymaster. A ruthless, fiercely loyal civil servant, Walsingham worked brilliantly behind the scenes to foil Elizabeth's rival Mary Queen of Scots and outwit Catholic Spain and France, which had arrayed their forces behind her.... ( )
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Tutter | Feb 20, 2015 |
Vivid, evocative, and fascinating. The depth of inquiry drops in the last third or so, but I was completely delighted by the description of how spying was conducted in the C.16. ( )
  cricketbats | Apr 1, 2013 |
A truly action-packed of Elizabethan court intrigue and European espionage. Some section, though, have too many details and the flow gets lost a bit.

http://lifelongdewey.wordpress.com/2012/01/26/327-her-majestys-spymaster-by-step... ( )
  NielsenGW | Jan 26, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To David Alverez
First words
Afterward, when the Seine flowed with corpses and thousands were dead, there were some who said that if only the assassin had not bungled his job in the first place all of the subsequent trouble might have been avoided.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Sir Francis Walsingham’s official title was principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I, but in fact this pious, tight-lipped Puritan was England’s first spymaster. A ruthless, fiercely loyal civil servant, Walsingham worked brilliantly behind the scenes to foil Elizabeth’s rival Mary Queen of Scots and outwit Catholic Spain and France, which had arrayed their forces behind her. Though he cut an incongruous figure in Elizabeth’s worldly court, Walsingham managed to win the trust of key players like William Cecil and the Earl of Leicester before launching his own secret campaign against the queen’s enemies. Covert operations were Walsingham’s genius; he pioneered techniques for exploiting double agents,
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670034266, Hardcover)

Sir Francis Walsingham’s official title was principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I, but in fact this pious, tight-lipped Puritan was England’s first spymaster. A ruthless, fiercely loyal civil servant, Walsingham worked brilliantly behind the scenes to foil Elizabeth’s rival Mary Queen of Scots and outwit Catholic Spain and France, which had arrayed their forces behind her.

Though he cut an incongruous figure in Elizabeth’s worldly court, Walsingham managed to win the trust of key players like William Cecil and the Earl of Leceister before launching his own secret campaign against the queen’s enemies. Covert operations were Walsingham’s genius; he pioneered techniques for exploiting double agents, spreading disinformation, and deciphering codes with the latest code-breaking science that remain staples of international espionage.

In the taut narrative of a spy novel, Budiansky recounts how this legendary spymaster invented the art and science of modern espionage—and in the process set Elizabethan England on the path to empire.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:37 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

A narrative of the career of Queen Elizabeth I's intelligence operative documents how he helped the monarch to outmaneuver Spain and France by pioneering techniques to expose double agents, spread disinformation, and decipher codes.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
11 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.47)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 3
2.5
3 20
3.5 6
4 13
4.5 1
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 118,698,795 books! | Top bar: Always visible