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Berge des Wahnsinns: Eine Horrorgeschichte…
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Berge des Wahnsinns: Eine Horrorgeschichte (suhrkamp taschenbuch) (original 1936; edition 1997)

by H. P. Lovecraft, Rudolf Hermstein (Übersetzer)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9273316,589 (3.72)123
This classic mind-shattering tale, which "ranks high among the horror stories of the English language," plunges into the darkness of the Cthulhu mythos (Time). In the uncharted wastes of Antarctica, an exploration party from Miskatonic University encounters a gory sight when they discover their advance team's camp has been destroyed and its members slaughtered. There is no evidence of what happened except a series of burial mounds, six of which contain dead specimens of unknown species. Eight similar tombs are empty, but they haven't been broken into--they've been broken out of.   What began as a search for knowledge soon becomes a terrifying confrontation with the true nature of the world and the universe in all its stark blackness and unyielding oblivion. For mankind is not--and never has been--the bright light of creation. It's all a mistake, an insignificant stain of existence, forgotten by an unwitting and indifferent creator . . . until now.   This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.… (more)
Member:schmechi
Title:Berge des Wahnsinns: Eine Horrorgeschichte (suhrkamp taschenbuch)
Authors:H. P. Lovecraft
Other authors:Rudolf Hermstein (Übersetzer)
Info:Suhrkamp Verlag (1997), Ausgabe: 8, Taschenbuch, 192 Seiten
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:Antarktis, Horror, Phantastischer Roman, Utopie, Wissenschaft, Abenteuer

Work details

At the Mountains of Madness by H. P. Lovecraft (1936)

  1. 00
    Vaults of Yoh Vombis (The Unexpurgated Clark Ashton Smith Ser.) by Clark A. Smith (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: Smith's tale seems to have been at least partly inspired by his friend Lovecraft's novel, which he read in manuscript before it was published.
  2. 00
    Best Ghost Stories of Algernon Blackwood by Algernon Blackwood (ocgreg34)
  3. 00
    The People of the Pit {story} by Abraham Merritt (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: An important (albeit somewhat lightweight) precursor to the classic Lovecraft tale.
  4. 00
    The Terror by Dan Simmons (MarcusH)
    MarcusH: H.P. Lovecraft's novella calls about the desolation of the Antarctic to create a sense of terror in the reader. Simmons' novel also calls upon the desolation of the Arctic to create a similar sense of suspense. Simmons' novel is much lengthier and does not rely on fantasy as Lovecraft does. The Terror is more horror, but it still shares the great tradition of suspense with Lovecraft's writing.… (more)
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» See also 123 mentions

English (23)  German (4)  French (3)  Spanish (2)  All languages (32)
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
Ten percent of this book was an introduction to H.P. Lovecraft, a story that would cure insomnia (49 percent), thirty four percent which was about supernatural horror in literature, then a listing of all of Lovecraft's works with the last few pages devoted to links to something that I refuse to re-read.

I really don't know what to say besides yawn. I wanted to be frightened, scared silly, not bored over and over again reading about an expedition to Antarctica where our narrator finds out about ancient beings called "The Great Old Ones" and proceeds to tell us every little thing about them to the point I was saying who cares.

This story was told in the first person by a geologist named Dyer. Apparently something so horrific that would scar mankind from life was found during one of his expeditions. Coming across an advance party Dyer finds all of the men and dogs dead. From there he and a student named Danforth fly past the mountains and come across some hieroglyphics that they can read (which also made me roll my eyes) and come to know the story of these things called the Great Old Ones.

I just didn't care. This story dragged on forever. There was too much science and then way too much explanation on the Elder Things and other beings that were created. I felt like I was reading a biology book. To me, the scariest thing is the unknown. This story made the unknown plainly known until somehow Danforth sees something that drove him mad and he proceeded to just bellow out random things. I guess that was the scary part.

The writing was not that great and so repetitious. I hope you like the words, Jurassic, Comanchian, mountains, mountains of madeness, Cyclopean, etc. I just at one time started highlighting those words every time I saw them and finally stopped because it was slowing down my reading and I wanted to be done with this story.

The flow was terrible. I think because of all of the science and discussion of latitude, longitude, dogs and sleds I would just wonder how the heck we were getting from scene to scene.

The setting of the Antarctica should have been better used. Being in a vast cold place where all you see is ice should have upped the scary factor. But honestly, it sounded like a walk in the park.
( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
"At the Mountains of Acute Boredom" wäre der passendere Titel gewesen. Ich liebe die mir bekannten Kurzgeschichten Lovecrafts, aber das hier ist ein Desaster durch und durch. Ich hatte stellenweise den Eindruck, die Broschüre eines Maklers für Wohnungen in Monsterhausen zu lesen, dermaßen geschwätzig überdetailliert habe ich die Beschreibungen (die sich in ständigen Wiederholungen ergehen) der Stadt in den Bergen empfunden (die Passagen zu Beginn der Expedition waren auch nicht viel besser). Auf soetwas wie Atmosphäre, interessante Handlung etc. habe ich dagegen leider vergeblich gewartet, vor lauter Innenarchitektur wurden diese Aspekte der Geschichte wohl total vergessen. Den Abbruch hab ich mir nur verkniffen, weil ich ob des großen Autors bis kurz vor Schluß auf einen Moment gehofft habe, für den die Quälerei sich gelohnt hätte. Vergeblich, wie ich feststellen musste. ( )
  Horrortorte | May 17, 2019 |
La storia si svolge in Antartide e racconta le gesta di una spedizione scientifica che si ritrova ad avere a che fare con i resti una civiltà scomparsa.
Molto presto si accorgeranno che la vecchia città sepolta dalla neve non è così disabitata come loro credono: delle creature mostruose e giganti si metteranno sul loro cammino.
Ho adocchiato questo libro pensando di vivere qualche emozione dato che viene definito "romanzo horror"e che Lovecraft viene descritto da Amazon come "Artista geniale e spietato indagatore del lato oscuro dell’animo umano".
Forse non l'ho capito io o forse il guardare serie tv come The Walking Dead o Criminal Minds ha inaridito il mio cuore e alzato la tolleranza delle mie coronarie, ma ho trovato questo libro di una noia mortale (per rimanere in tema...). Neanche per un secondo ho provato ansia, terrore o curiosità sulla vicenda, mi sono trascinata velocemente verso la fine solo perchè comunque è scritto bene e scorre veloce.
Ora mi chiedo se vale la pena leggere altro di Lovecraft.... Ai posteri!
( )
1 vote Feseven78 | Apr 17, 2019 |
'At the Mountains of Madness' starts out much like any other Lovecraft, with too many protestations of truth-speaking and uttering the unutterable, but what sets it apart from other Lovecraft tales is its incredible scope. Millennia of history are decoded from stone walls and to an extent the reader is carried along on nothing more than those revelations. The actual horrors of monsters, of gruesome acts and what left the narrator's colleague gibbering are as a matter of course left unsaid.

For pure grit and world-building Lovecraft gets full marks. The turgid and monotonous drone of the narrator's prose, however, drags 'Mountains' down. Balance, Mr. Lovecraft, balance. I've been making my way through Lovecraft's works for some months now. The ups and downs of even those curated selections is enough for me to never attempt anything comprehensive.

Whenever our author rose above the chattering and smoke screens of his verbose narrators Lovecraft was innovative. I was more than willing to suspend any and all disbelief the moment the recital of the 'Elder Things' history began. I love a chronicle. Antarctica was at the time, and still is, a fascinating place for research. Dreaming of what could be under that ice and going for an entire space-borne civilization whose mishandling of their own half-forgotten technology brought about their downfall? It took vision and guts to do that instead of some raggedy sasquatch/laser cannon alien yarn, which would have netted Lovecraft a lot more money and success.

I appreciate the effort. Lovecraft worked against the greatest inertia imaginable - the boorish expectations of the readership and the strict formulae of pulp editors. He wasn't well-rewarded during his lifetime but because of the promise of stories like this his growing reputation is justified. ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 18, 2019 |
I have read a few HP Lovecraft stories, and they have all disappointed me. This one is actually a novella, and I liked it much more. I can actually see form this story why people might enjoy his work.

This story has all the usual Lovecraft themes--exploration (Antarctica this time), strange happenings, strange beings, fear. And the usual narrator saying "It was so awful I can't actually say it!" which drives me crazy. This narrator, though, did actually finally explain what he saw--but not what his co-pilot saw that caused a breakdown. An improvement nonetheless!

I do think that the novella format allowed Lovecraft to get into the meat of the story. There is lots of description, and a map or illustration might have been nice--but I have my own in my head now. I also read this on the Serial Reader app, so maybe text versions do have some illustrations. I wonder how close what is in my head is what Lovecraft was trying to describe.

I do still think I would have enjoyed Lovecraft's work a lot more if I had found it in middle or high school. I was obsessed with Agatha Christie at the time. ( )
  Dreesie | Jan 21, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (42 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
H. P. Lovecraftprimary authorall editionscalculated
Derleth, AugustEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fischer, A. F.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hermstein, RudolfTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Joshi, S. T.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Turner, JamesIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wuerz. TimoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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I am forced into speech because men of science have refused to follow my advice without knowing why.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This work represents the novella, which has been separately published as a standalone work. It may be contained in other works, but should not be combined with omnibus editions/collections, e.g., At the Mountains of Madness and Other Novels, At the Mountains of Madness and Other Macabre Tales, At the Mountains of Madness and Other Tales of Terror, etc.
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This classic mind-shattering tale, which "ranks high among the horror stories of the English language," plunges into the darkness of the Cthulhu mythos (Time). In the uncharted wastes of Antarctica, an exploration party from Miskatonic University encounters a gory sight when they discover their advance team's camp has been destroyed and its members slaughtered. There is no evidence of what happened except a series of burial mounds, six of which contain dead specimens of unknown species. Eight similar tombs are empty, but they haven't been broken into--they've been broken out of.   What began as a search for knowledge soon becomes a terrifying confrontation with the true nature of the world and the universe in all its stark blackness and unyielding oblivion. For mankind is not--and never has been--the bright light of creation. It's all a mistake, an insignificant stain of existence, forgotten by an unwitting and indifferent creator . . . until now.   This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

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Book description
Lovecraft helped shape a popular subgenre of science fiction, the "weird tale," which blended science with horror to create moody tales of monsters from beyond the stars. This novella, written in 1931, introduces us to some of Lovecraft's most terrifying alien creatures, discovered by a team of scientists exploring Antarctica.

Contains the following novellas/short stories:

At the Mountains of Madness
The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
The Shunned House
The Dreams in the Witch-House
The Statement of Randolph Carter
The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath
The Silver Key
Through the Gates of the Silver Key
Contains the following novellas/short stories:

At the Mountains of Madness
The Shunned House
The Dreams in the Witch-House
The Statement of Randolph Carter
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