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Social Contract: Essays by Locke, Hume, and…
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Social Contract: Essays by Locke, Hume, and Rousseau

by John Locke, David Hume, Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Other authors: Ernest Barker (Introduction)

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this is a ddhifferent edition - 1926?
  AlanBudreau | Apr 2, 2018 |
Contents: Introduction, Sir Ernest Barker; An Essay Concerning the True Original, Extent and End of Civil Government, John Locke; Of the Original Contract, David Hume; The Social Contract, J.J. Rousseau.

The idea of social contract which flourished in the 18th century found its roots and inspiration in three sources: the teaching of the Bible (which instructed that the powers that be are ordained of God, bu t also that David made a covenant with his people); the doctrines of Roman Law (which directed that "the people, by the Law of the Monarch passed in regard to his authority, confers upon him and into his hands all its authority and power"); and three principles of Aristotle's Politics (which favored a clear distinction between king and tyrant, and endorsed the right of the masses not only to elect the magistrate but also to call him to account).

These rudimentary principles became the political inheritance of the Middle Ages and took the form of a contract of government between feudal king and feudatory. "I will be to you faithful and true . . . on condition that you keep me as I am willing to deserve, and all that fulfill that our agreement was, when I to you submitted and chose your will."

Later, in the 18th century, these principles of "contracts of government" became transmuted into "contracts of society," and found their fullest expression in the writings of Locke, Hume, and Rousseau. The three essays collected in this volume proved to be as rich in their legacy to future political systems as they had been rich in their inheritance from the past. Their influence is seen in many revolutionary social treatises, in the writings of Thomas Paine, and, moreover, in the Constitutions of all free nations.

From the back cover of the volume.
  gmicksmith | Sep 20, 2009 |
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» Add other authors (13 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Locke, Johnprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hume, Davidmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Rousseau, Jean-Jacquesmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Barker, ErnestIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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The general idea of the Social Contract, which has haunted the generations (it was current in the days of Plato, during the fourth century B.B., and it still flutters in the pages of Herbert Spencer's The Man versus the State at the end of the nineteenth century of our era), may be criticized on various grounds.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0195003098, Paperback)

Contents: Introduction, Sir Ernest Barker; An Essay Concerning the True Original, Extent and End of Civil Government, John Locke; Of the Original Contract, David Hume; The Social Contract, J.J. Rousseau.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:05:21 -0400)

The idea of social contract which flourished in the 18th century found its Bible (which instructed that the powers that be are ordained of God, but also David made a covenant with his people) ; the doctrines of Roman Law (which directed that "the people, by Law of the Monarch passed in regard to his authority and power") ; and the principles of Aristotle's Politics (which favored a clear distinction between king and tyrant, and endorsed the right of the masses not only to elect the magistrate but also to call him to account). These rudimentary principles became the political inheritance of the Middle Ages and took the form of a contract of government between feudal king and feudatory. "I will be to you faithful and true ... on condition that our agreement was, when I to you submitted and chose your will." Later, in the 18th century, these principles of "contracts of goverment" became transmuted into "contracts of society," and found their fullest expression in the writings of Locke, Hume, and Rousseau. The three essays collected in this volume proved to be rich in their legacy to future political systems as they had been rich in their inheritance from the past. Their influence is seen in many revolutionary social treatises, in the writings of Thomas Paine, and, moreover, in the Constitution of all free nation---The Editor.… (more)

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