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Markets without Limits: Moral Virtues and…
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Markets without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests (edition 2015)

by Jason F. Brennan (Author)

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Member:NewCopenhagenLibrary
Title:Markets without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests
Authors:Jason F. Brennan (Author)
Info:Routledge (2015), 252 pages
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Markets without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests by Jason F. Brennan

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0415737354, Paperback)

May you sell your vote? May you sell your kidney? May gay men pay surrogates to bear them children? May spouses pay each other to watch the kids, do the dishes, or have sex? Should we allow the rich to genetically engineer gifted, beautiful children? Should we allow betting markets on terrorist attacks and natural disasters?

Most people shudder at the thought. To put some goods and services for sale offends human dignity. If everything is commodified, then nothing is sacred. The market corrodes our character. Or so most people say.

In Markets without Limits, Jason Brennan and Peter Jaworski give markets a fair hearing. The market does not introduce wrongness where there was not any previously. Thus, the authors claim, the question of what rightfully may be bought and sold has a simple answer: if you may do it for free, you may do it for money. Contrary to the conservative consensus, they claim there are no inherent limits to what can be bought and sold, but only restrictions on how we buy and sell.

(retrieved from Amazon Fri, 04 Sep 2015 13:02:42 -0400)

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